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Full text of "S.F. Newsletter (Jan.-June 1902)"

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2007 1501717 3 

CaHoma Sum LOraiy 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185«. 

8AN r^citeij 



Annual Subscription, $4,00. 



NE\^S-I|ErTER 




Vol. LXIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 4, 1902. 



Number 1. 



The San Francisco Na-wa I.rrTKtt is printed and published every Saturday 
bj the proprietor. FREDERICK MARRIOTT, Hi Kearny St.. San Francisco 

Entered at Ban FraneUco Poslofflce as second-class matter. 

The offlce of the 8. F. NEWS LETTER In London Eng., Is at SO Con. hi: 
E. C.. London, England, (George Street <fc Co.. Representatives), where 
information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 

Chicago Representative— Arthur C. Quick. Room 500, Masot.lc Temple 
Chleago. 

New York Representative— C. Ironmonger, 116 Nassau Street, New York 

Boston Representative— W. IT. Daggett, 36 Broomfield Street, Boston. 

All social items, annonncemeuts, advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication In the current number of the NEWS LETTER should he 
sen t to this offlce not later than 5 p.m. Thursday previous to day of issue 

The man who will invent asbestos whiskers for ama- 
teur Santa Clauses will make a fortune. 



The American heiress who has married a fiddler is on a 
par with this American city, which has chosen one for Mayor. 



Lady Yarde-Buller, who was loose during the holidays, had 
a very merry Christmas, with the result that she is again 
in a Livermore sanitarium. 



Can the little Los Angeles boy who saved the life of a 
would-be suicide be regarded as a young hero or as a mis- 
chievous meddler? 



The news that Croker will resign from the Tammany lead- 
ership is sure evidence that, financially, New York politics 
have been drained. 



The number of soldiers at the Presidio ought to be 
doubled — the second half could act as guards to keep the 
first half sober and decent. 



There was good reason for this being a happy New Year, 
since the problem crank had no excuse to stop and argue 
over what century we are in. 



Mr. Charles G. Wahlgren of Chicago is said to be the 
double of President Roosevelt, but the News Letter is ready 
to bet that he is not so good a man. 



The American trust that has cornered Turkish tobacco to 
manufacture in German mills may be justly accused of doing 
a somewhat hybrid business. 



The man who buncoed General Shatter into signing checks 
for $496 is doubtless thinking by this time that the General 
did not get his title in any financial battle. 



Since Miss Stone is trying to convert, the heathen who 
have captured her, the missionaries are growing more and 
more hopeful that she will be soon turned loose. 



And despite the fact that the French have made the hun- 
dredth and first discovery that consumption can be cured 
the death rate from that dread disease continues to increase. 



The business men of Santa Ana declare that the reports 
of the storm there, sent abroad by the local Associated 
Press correspondent, are exaggerated and false. The cor- 
respondent acknowledges that the storm of last week could 
not hold a candle to the storm which the Santa Anites are 
blowing up over his head. 




What is the matter with the kidnappers after the Gould 
children forming a close corporation and running the busi- 
ness as a legitimate industry? 



The savagery of the Filipinos forms texts for some of the 
newspapers. Probably our Revolutionary forefathers had 
the same charges brought against them when they, also, 
fought for freedom. 



Uncle Samuel, in disregarding the protests of the Musi- 
cians' Union against marine bands filling outside engage- 
ments has put himself on record as the biggest "scab" on 
earth. 



Two Californians, Messrs. Z. E. Drake and Henry T. 
Bangs, have gone all the way to Chicago to set up a fly 
exterminating factory. They are not needed here, presuma- 
bly because there are no flies on California. 



It is small wonder that the Creamery Operators' Conven- 
tion, which met here this week, is a body of importance, 
since it is made up entirely of men who cut considerable 
cheese. 



The Danes are queer people/ They want to sell the Danish 
West Indies to us, but are actually hesitating because they 
don't know whether it will be agreeable to the inhabitants 
thereof. 



The Earl of Roslyn claims to have discovered a system by 
which he can break the bank at Monte Carlo, and is organiz- 
ing a syndicate for that purpose. He'd find is easier to marry 
a foolish American heiress, and he wouldn't have to divide 
profits with the syndicate. 



That the new Queen of England indignantly refused to 
meet the infamous Mrs. George Keppel should serve as a 
proof to the world at large that aristocracy and respecta- 
bility may go hand in hand, and that with a certain degree 
of dignity. 



Healer Schlatter has just been released from a term at 
Blackwell's Island, New York, and has made a public appear- 
ance without hair or whiskers. The dupes who were pres- 
ent complained that the touch of the healer has lost its 
powers since the removal of his whiskers. His touch was, 
however, still sufficiently potent to bring him in a neat 
little sum in general admission. 



The latest reports of Major Strong and May Yohe, who are 
cutting it wide in Yokohama, are to the effect that weak 
Strong has become a hopeless paretic. He must have been 
well along in -the brain-wasting disease when he married May 
Yohe. The latter is intending soon to star it in a play which 
is to embody the principal events of her life. The play 
will probably be suppressed on grounds of indecency. 



The Examiner has committed a sensational newspaper 
coup by interviewing the fiancee of Marconi instead of the 
electrical genius himself. The future Mrs. M. is largely re- 
sponsible for the invention of wireless telegraphy. It was 
she who first made signals with her eyes to the Italian, who 
understood them perfectly, though at a considerable dis- 
tance away. Thus do great things from small beginnings 
trow. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



NOW TO BUSINESS. 

The holidays are over. Christmas has been merry, Santa 
Claus has lost none of his old-time benevolence, the hearts 
of the young have been gladdened, and because they were, 
the hearts of the old have reciprocated their evident en- 
chantment, the poor, who are always with us, have not fared 
badly, the inmates of our hospitals, prisons and charitable 
institutions have been made to feel that they are still part 
of humanity, and that the brotherhood of man and the fath- 
erhood of God are not mere phrases to pass glibly off the 
tongue, but are active, living realities, that make the whole 
world kin. The press, with more credit than it is usually 
entitled to, has done its best to enliven things, to picture 
our people, their homes and their places of business as they 
really are, and to provide a meaus whereby the outside world 
may know that California affords a Paradise to all who are 
here and a hospitable welcome to all who may have the good 
fortune to come and cast in their lot with us. When Moses 
was taken to the top of Mount Piscah and "viewed the 
landscape o'er," he looked upon no such goodly land as we 
have right here iu this great central entrepot of the broadest 
and biggest ocean on earth. Ours is not only a land "flow- 
ing with milk and honey;" it is full of the grains, the fruits, 
the wines, and last, but not least. th° golden rocks and sands 
that, in these times, talk, govern, rule and purchase all 
things that are good to taste, to touch, to hear and to see. 
In the humdrum of business activities, we are too apt to 
forget these bountiful provisions of a kind Providence. The 
great value of Christmas and New Year's day is that they 
come in to give up pause, induce reflection, and to set on foot 
a kind of mental stock taking. Well, we are through with 
all that, and are abundantly content with the stock on the 
shelves, the balance to the right side of profit and loss, 
and above all we are happy in knowing that money is easy 
and our bank credits never better. With the ships of trade 
and commerce bowling along before a stiff breeze, we start 
the New Year full of hope and great expectations. We shall 
all now settle down to business with more distinct purposes, 
more experience, and more enterprise. If we but will it 
so, "the earth is ours and the fulness thereof." We have 
measured our strength with all competitors and found there 
is no limit to the possibilities we mean to realize. The 
year 1901 has been an exceedingly prosperous one, but it 
will be surpassed by the year 1902, and yet expansion, in its 
truest and best sense will still go on, and reach limits to 
which no man to-day can set bounds. 



MILITARY DISCIPLINE AT THE PRESIDIO. 

It never has been, and probably never will be a good 
thing for a large city to have a military garrison located 
within its borders. Drunkenness, immorality and vice are 
pretty sure to prevail wherever any considerable number of 
soldiers are bunched in idleness and surrounded by all 
sorts of temptations. San Francisco had its first and worst 
experience of that sort of thing when unfortunate Camp Mer- 
ritt was established. The Presidio, of course, is a vast 
improvement upon that never-to-be-forgotten camp, but, tor 
all that, it is too near to the vicious part of the city to 
be considered entirely the right place. It would have been 
better if, when troops first began to be massed here for des- 
patch to Manila, the high ground above Benicia had been 
selected for their encampment. They could have been 
shipped from there at much less cost than from San Fran- 
cisco, and the soldiers would have met with less temptation 
and been better off :n every way. Many of the officers were 
of that way of thinking at the time, but were unable to cope 
with the many "pulls" that were at work. All sorts and 
conditions of men wanted the soldiers located in San Fran- 
cisco because of the money they would spend. That's busi- 
ness, but not civic pride or good morals. And now that 
raw recruits are being sent here from all over the country, 
there is a lawless disposition only too manifest around the 
Presidio, despite the best efforts of the officers to suppp ss 
it. Recruits are not yet soldiers, nor subject to strict mili- 
tary discipline, and until they are sworn in and drafted into 
regiments, their officers have got to shut their eyes to many 
things that will not be tolerated later on. Meanwhile, tin re 
is a dead-set on the part oi the men against the neighboring 



saloons, several of which have been raided and destroyed. 
They ought never to have been given licenses to ply their 
callings where they located themselves. That bad beer, 
worse whisky, and death-dealing drugs have been purveyed 
goes without saying. That the soldiers have been drugged 
and robbed, as they claim, is no doubt true. The saloon 
keepers are bringing damage suits against the city, which 
in turn will look to the Government to be recouped in the 
amount to which it may be out and injured. If, however, 
it had exercised ordinary discretion in withholding licenses 
from saloons placed where they could do the most harm, 
nobody would have been damaged. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S INTEREST IN THE TRANSPORT 
SERVICE. 
Our city ought to take more interest in the nation's trans- 
port service across the Pacific than it does. The whole busi- 
ness ought to have the keen eye of local scrutiny focused 
upon it, to the end that the national treasury be protected 
and the service rendered effective. The waste and ineffi- 
ciency of the very recent past have been appalling, and 
could have been and ought to have been avoided, if we were 
all just as good and patriotic citizens as we ought to be. We 
fear the trouble has been that some of us have partaken 
of the pork. During the past year over four millions of doi 
lars have been expended on the fleet of antiquated vessels 
bought in 1S9S, at prices enormously beyond their value. 
One of the largest of these, it appears from the official re- 
port, "carries practically no freight, requires constant re- 
pairs, and burns enormous quantities of coal, besides being 
too cumbersome." Very few of the fleet, the report declares, 
are suitable for transports. Moreover, there have been a 
number of accidents and several complete wrecks, while 
some of the ships have been sold at a mere tithe of their 
original cost. The transport service ought never to have 
been supervised by the army instead of the navy depart- 
ment, and probably never have been undertaken by the 
Government at all. Large fortunes have gone to persons 
who in the time of their country's emergency cared more 
for private gain than for honest dealing. Rather late in the 
day the army department has become aroused to this condi- 
tion of affairs, and proposes to amend it by leaving trans- 
portation to the competition of private firms. That is the 
method by which England has carried on her vast transport 
service to South Africa without a hitch or scandal. Our local 
Chamber of Commerce, we notice, proposes to take a hand 
in this matter. Any one or all of the steam lines now plying 
to the orient could be induced for a consideration to call in 
at Manila, and they could not be turned to better account 
than by being made competitors for the business. A sep- 
arate, slow and costly line would not fill the bill as it can 
be filled. There should be an end to jobbery in this business. 



ANARCHY ISLE. 



Senator Hoar of Massachusetts, is the very capable father 
of a new idea. He wants the United States, in conjunction 
with any of the powers willing to enter into the scheme, to 
occupy some uninhabited island in the South Pacific as a 
penal settlement to which all who preach, teach or practice 
anarchy may be transported. A concert of action by the 
powers has been proposed before, but this, we think, is the 
first time it has been suggested that the anarchists be segre- 
gated into a country of their own where they shall have 
free scope to practice their peculiar doctrines among them- 
selves. Some years ago Spain invited a conference of 
the European powers to consider and determine upon joiut 
measures for dealing with anarchy, but the project fell 
to the ground through the refusal of England to share in it. 
Mr. Gladstone, then as ever sensitive as to the rights of the 
individual man, said that "the legal methods of establishing 
proof in several continental countries were so opposed to 
English ideas of justice that any joint action iu dealing with 
persons accused of crime was impossible." But under Sena- 
tor Hoar's plan, as we understand it. each nation would only 
be responsible for the conviction of its own offenders. The 
only "joint" responsibility there would be about the mat- 
ter at all would be as to the selection and matnte- 



January 4, 1902. 



3AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



oaoce of the Island settlement, and about that there 
ought to be no great difficulty. The Islands of the Booth 
Pacific are all fertile, and with a little seed and a tern farm 
Implements, no man who Is willing to work need star-. 
deed, many of the islands spontaneously produce more than 
sufficient food to support a considerable population. Any- 
how. the anarchists, after receiving a fair start, should be 
left to shift for themselves. No outside Interference should 
be permitted. No sort of Government, except one of their 
own making, should be set over them. They are opposed 
to all Governments, and it would remain to be seen how 
long they could do without one. It may be pretty safely 
taken for granted that the strong would begin by robbing 
the weak, and that ere long the young athletes, quick with 
pistol and knife, would form an oligarchy that would estab- 
lish a worse tyranny than any other known on earth. If, 
like the Kilkenny cats, they should end by destroying each 
other, so much the better. The world would be well rid ot 
its red-handed disturbers of its peace. 

It Is to be earnestly hoped that there will be no paltering 
with this subject on the part of Congress. The disciples 
of Most, Goldman and Isaak have assassinated one President 
too many; they must never be permitted to murder another. 
Upon that the American people are resolutely determined, 
and Congress, we are persuaded, will not fail to take notice 
and govern itself accordingly. It may or it may not adopt 
Senator Hoar's plan, but it can, we feel assured, be de- 
pended upon to deal with the subject with a heavy hand. 

Last week, whilst Congress and the cabinet were discuss- 
ing measures to suppress anarchy, the anarchists themselves 
were bold enough to come out into the open and hurl back 
defiances at Congress and the authorities. At a large public 
meeting held in Chicago, the socialists and anarchists met 
to discuss their rival theories. Both sides were out In full 
force. A Mr. Simmons sustained the side of socialists, and 
claimed that "social regeneration would couie without assas- 
sination." "You are a liar," yelled a solid phalanx of ex- 
cited anarchists. "Three cheers for Czolgosz." were called 
for and lustily given. Thereupon, Abraham Isaak, erstwhile 
of San Francisco, but now editor of Free Society, an anar- 
chist paper published in Chicago, took the platform to reply 
to Simmons. He stid among other things that "Anarchy 
means the liberty of man. The delivery of society lies not 
inside but outside of Government. You must resist robbery 
individually, not by a majority vote, as my opponent claims. 
I am accused of dodging assassination. The thing is inevit- 
able, and you cannot dodge it. I do not denounce Czolgosz; 
he was a better man than I am. He could not see misery, 
as I can, and pass it by without doing something. He struck 
a blow at what he believed to be the root of the evil. I go 
home and write an article about it, but do nothing. He did 
something, and therefore was a better man than I am." 
There is not much mincing of matters in such talk as that. 
Who would have believed on the 7th of September last that 
within three months such proceedings as those had at the 
Chicago meeting could take place in any part of this coun- 
try? The other day a street orator was arrested in Phila- 
delphia for saying: "He hoped somebody would arise to 
shoot Roosevelt." Nothing could be done to him because 
he was only exercising his right to free speech. It cannot 
too soon be brought home to the Isaaks of the period that 
no man can counsel murder and retain his own liberty to 
be at large. Free speech is no longer free when it spawns 
rebellion and endangers all but the speaker. 



"TOO MUCH LATIN." 



It seems that we have not got the ideal university yet, 
and this despite the fact that some of the broadest-guaged 
men in the country have contributed enormous sums to pro- 
duce one. Learned professors all along the line are express- 
ing dissatisfaction with the universities of to-day. Profes- 
sor Bacon of Berkeley speaks with the authority that comes 
of experience when he denounces co-education of the sexes 
in our universities. He has satisfied himself that the best 
results cannot be obtained where it exists. David Starr 
Jordan, President of Stanford, is out in a smart phillipic 
against the practice of teaching "too much Latin" in our 
Universities, and one of the leading professors in. Berlin 



says the tame thing Is true of Germany. He declare* that 
in these days it Is not so much a knowledge of d ■•ad Ian 
guages that is needed as an acquaintance with lira Indus- 
tries. There cannot be a doubt about that ract. The com- 
petition for the world's business is becoming so Strenuous 
that only men specially trained for the tasks of the period 
can reasonably hope to hold their own In the conflict that 
is waxing more severe every day. Yet if there be a man in 
all America acquainted with the value and necessity of 
expert training that man should be Andrew Carnegie. H. 
was a poor Scotch boy, without any Latin or Greek, but with 
such a profound knowledge of how to manufacture iron 
and steel that it has made him rich beyond the dreams or 
avarice. One would have thought that he at any rate would 
have known how to appreciate the kind of equipment the 
young men of the day require in order to achieve success. 
Yet, strange to tell, he has just donated ten millions of dol- 
lars to the founding of a post-graduate university in Wash- 
ington City. That is to say, he does not think that the 
knowledge of Latin and Greek obtained at Harvard, Yale 
and the other universities is profound enough for young 
America, and at his own cost he proposes to furnish them 
an opportunity to pursue their studies still further on that 
line. We think it a waste of money. The German professor 
we have referred to has said: "There is no more useless man 
in creation than he whose head is stuffed with Latin and 
Greek, but nothing else." It looks as if university ideals 
are undergoing very considerable changes. It would seem 
to be wise that we should make up our minds as to what we 
really do want before going much further. While we are not 
quite willing to allow the dead languages to become forgot- 
ten languages, we yet believe that they should be given a 
place and no more than a place. Otherwise, what does 
"modern education" mean and wherein is the benefit ot 
the higher training of which we boast? 



POTTER AND RAINSFORD AGAINST PROHIBITION. 

Bishop Potter and Dr. Rainsford of New York have given 
the Woman's Christian Temperance Union a New Year's 
shock that it will not get over for many a day, if it ever 
does. The trouble with these renowned clergymen is that, 
living in the Empire City, and going among its slums to res- 
cue the fallen, uplift the poor and needy, and tender heart 
to heart talks to the toilers, they have been brought into 
close contact with the liquor traffic, and understand it as 
no woman of society can possibly do. They are for the 
possible and the attainable. They are of the opinion that 
the temperance workers must adopt a different policy if they 
are to expect success. They know from wide observation 
that prohibition does not prohibit. With a perversity not 
unknown to human nature, the man who is restrained of his 
liberty to take a drink when he wants to, demonstrates his 
independence by indulgence when he would otherwise ab- 
stain. It is an old saying and a true one that you cannot 
make a man a total abstainer by an act of the Legislature. 
Personal habits cannot be regulated by law. These very 
temperance women, for instance, could not be induced to 
abstain from the health-destroying habit of tight lacing 
by statutory enactment. They are not indulging in it to 
the extent they once did, but the change is only being 
brought about by education as to what is best for their 
health and comfort, and so it must be with the bad habit 
of over-indulgence in intoxicants. Men, like women, will 
yield to reason that which could never be extorted from 
them by force. But the Woman's Temperance Union appears 
of late years to have abandoned the strongest weapon in its 
armory. It has grown tired of moral suasion, and has taken 
to political meetings and halls of legislation in order to 
drive intoxicants out of the country. It might as well try- 
to prevent the soil producing rye, barley, corn, potatoes, 
grapes, etc., which are the primary cause of there being in- 
toxicants in the world. It is true, that would be fighting 
against the God of nature, but that would be no greater 
task than that of contending against the natural tastes of 
a whole race. "There are many noble workers." says 
Bishop Potter, "among these prohibitionists, but they do 
not accomplish much because their methods are not in 
sympathy with the spirit of the age." He does not hesitate 
to say that "prohibition is a fraud and a failure." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



A PLEA FOR LILIUOKALANI. 

People interested in Liliuokalani, ex-Queen of the Ha- 
waiian Islands, and who are anxious that she should have 
justice at the hands of the United States, are sending out 
to the press of the country an article written by A. It. 
Rose-Soley which, besides having literary worth, is a strong 
plea for the deposed Queen. The author says of her: 

'"Liliuokalani, queenly though she be, does not forget, 
and in her memory lurk some curious illustrations of Ameri- 
can sympathy. She can recall the lost Hawaiian flag, for 
which the Hawaiian Ladies' Patriotic Society vainly peti- 
tioned an American Admiral; she can recall her own con- 
fiscated flag, the Royal Standard, hanging in an American 
drawing-room and gleefully pointed out to her by an Ameri- 
can woman. She remembers beautiful Kaiulani — the Prin- 
cess of the Broken Heart — borne to the tom'o without the 
national emblem; small wonder if she should put ber own 
value on American kindness. Kaiulani came to know what 
is was worth and died of the knowledge; the soul within her 
fainted before the tyranny which came, and in the name of 
freedom, to filch her inheritance; and with youth's impa- 
tience of suffering she bent her dainty head and gave up 
life's struggle. Her aunt, made of sterner stuff, trained and 
matured in the school of suffering, has weathered the storm 
with stately endurance. A trifle more worn, perchance, a 
trifle more weary than of yore, she maintains her old un- 
complaining attitude; no word of reproach, no note of indig- 
nation escapes her; born to command she preserves her 
calm strength through adversity. But do not ask her to pre- 
serve her illusions." 

Liliuokalani speaks to the author of the personal suffer- 
ing entailed by her loss, but more particularly of the losses 
sustained by her relatives, who, under the old Hawaiian 
laws, were sharers of the crown lands — members of a 
patriarchal family. She is calm when speaking of political 
things, but is deeply affected when telling of her efforts to 
preserve the history, songs and traditions of her beloved 
islands. 

"The floodgates are opened," says the writer, "sweeping 
down reserve and reflection. Neither queen nor woman sits 
by me at this moment, but a passionate Hawaiian, the blood 
of her race and the love of her race leaping in her veins, the 
old racial traditions surging at her heart, rapt away by her 
one fierce desire to have those traditions safely preserved 
for all time. And then it is she tells me of the south breeze 
and the soft mist and the other nature influences that affect 
native life. 

" 'Everything in nature is an influence with us,' she goes 
on; 'no fog that rises, no breeze that blows, but bears 
a destiny, for good or evil, to the chief and chief's family 
within its district. Tree and leaf and flower, bird and fish 
and insect, are all interwoven with our life. As each family 
has its sacred bird or fish, whose name it bears, whose life 
it respects, for whose death it pays a penalty, so each is 
subject to the nature influences around it, and suffers or 
joys according to the whisper of the wind or the moan of 
the wave. 

"In the olden days," says Liliuokalani, "all these things 
were known and sung; the story of each family was the 
story of its nature influences, and the history of the whole 
nation was made up of these family stories. In the balmy 
nights, by the light of the cocoanut fires, they were chanted 
in soft, low tones, and handed down from generation to gen- 
eration. The art of traditional chant is already lost, but 
ere it can be entirely forgotten, ere our forests be cleared 
by the planters' hands, our climate altered, our influences 
destroyed, I am collecting the old songs and noting down 
the old melodies, that they may not be lost." 

The ex-Queen is still striving to regain her crown-lands, 
taken from her by the United States, and the author of the 
article quoted makes this plea: 

"We have brought her the curse of civilization, its sor- 
rows and its vices; we have robbed her of her inheritance, 
defrauded her of her power to do good, dragged her down 
from her pedestal. In return she hands us the historical 
traditions which prove the nobility of her race ere the white 
man was heard of." 



The author asks the women of America to help the ex- 
Queen recover her own, concluding as follows: 

"Ye have but to gather your forces, lift your voices, as- 
sert your sympathies, and one more tradition shall be added 
to Hawaiian story, the song of the white women who willed 
that justice be rendered their brown sister." 



NOT A CRITERION. 



The trial now going on in Modoc County of the alleged 
lynchers of Calvin Hall and his sons and Daniel Yantis is 
something not calculated to reflect any credit on California, 
and will be taken by outsiders as typical of the way justice 
is mal-admfnistered in this State. We are bad enough, the 
Lord knows, but people who don't know us must not take the 
Modoc affair as a sample of a California Superior Court trial. 
Throughout the greater part of the State justice walks on 
halting feet, but in a far more civilized way. Lawyers' 
technicalities and appeals to higher courts delay the con- 
viction of criminals; but in no other part of the State has 
there been, since the days of '49, such an open-handed, fla- 
grant flouting of the law as there is at present in Modoc 
County. The Judge on the bench quarrels with the wit- 
nesses and with the attorneys, and the lie is passed freely 
back and forth. One of the lawyers drew a pistol on a 
woman witness whose testimony did not suit him. This did 
not occur in the court room, but that was only because the 
lawyer happened to be sober while there. As soon as he 
went outside and imbibed some of the liquor peculiar to 
Modoc County, he committed the assault referred to. His 
arrest adds more complication in the trouble. 

There is no other part of the State where such lawlessness 
would be countenanced. Modoc is an isolated county, in- 
habited by a rough, wild people who are a law unto them- 
selves. The element in favor of the lynchers is so strong 
that it is hard to get witnesses to testify. Even the District 
Attorney is accused of being on the side of the defense, 
and apparently the accusation is justified. The Judge seems 
to be fair-minded, but he is a man of violent temper, a "gun- 
fighter," and possesses little idea of the dignity of his pro- 
fession. The lawyers and the public think even less of it. 
Altogether it is a bad condition, but one which we hope will 
not be looked upon as representatively Californian. 



AS TO SUNDAY CLOSING. 

Two Sunday closing questions are now agitating New 
York people. The saloons have been closed by law on Sun- 
days for some time, and now it is proposed to close the 
theatres. In the same breath there is agitation in favor of 
allowing the saloons to remain open on the Sabbath. That 
is not altogether because of a feeling in favor of having them 
op"n, but because the law is ineffective, as prohibition laws 
are in some States, and as the side entrance ordinance is 
in our own town. There was a great stir over side entrances 
here a year or so ago. Saloon keepers were put to a great 
expense in fitting up their places of business to conform 
with the new ordinance, and for awhile it was effective. But 
how is it now? Any man-about-town will tell you that there 
is no trouble getting into drinking places through side 
entrances, and having access to private rooms where drinks 
are served. In some places entrance is through a restau- 
rant; in others, through a principal door, near which a man 
stands and slides a protecting screen the instant a thirsty pair 
appears. Theatres can easily be closed by law on Sundays. 
But when it comes to trying to regulate what people should 
eat and drink, and when and where they shall eat and drink 
it, the law bumps up against a spirit that rebels against 
interference with personal liberty and against ingenuity 
that nearly always defeats it. 



There was a young fellow named Paul, 
Whose life was a sizzy high-ball; 
But he drank them so fast 
That they floored him at last, 
And now his name's nothing at all. 



Mumm's is the champagne to which all others are 

compared, but none of them are in the same class. It has 
the largest sales, and is used In the best clubs and hotels. 




January 4, 1902. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

A Tragedy of the Future. 

- a ptoaaant summer morning in th. 

• gentle end the sky wai wry blue, 
Where elofl, like skimming swallows, through the < loud 

tackr<i and raai 

i hundred kinds of airships by their skillful owners 
stet i 

su'MiMiiy from oul thp unra came a yo»th of brawn and 

pith 
Twaa the pluck] aereocjrcllst, Chhuncey Algernon De Smith,' 
And his trowsers were pneumatic anil his kirtle myitl 

green. 
And bis patent germ-proof necktie was a wonder to be seen. 

Agile Algy hastened forward, and his brow was dark with 

care 
And he tbongbt on Rosh Hi 01 ity, daughter of the trillionaire, 
Thi'ii he steered his dizzy motor through that region of the 

sky- 
Where McGintys cozy mansion mounted sixty stories high. 

Old McGinty made his fortune in a year of drouth and dearth 
Selling anti-hunger tablets to the people of the earth, 
So when Algy sought his daughter he was treated like a boor. 
For a hundredth century reason — Algernon was very poor. 

Nearer to his sweetheart's mansion Algernon began to tack 
Till he'd hung his aereocycle to a thirteenth story rack. 
Then he stood at Rosie's portal and he pressed a button hard 
Till appeared a dummy waiter who received his calling card. 

Presently came haughty Rosie, sparkling gems from head to 

foot 
And her gown was gold-embroidered and her shoes were gold 

to boot, 
And her mein was so expensive that it made De Smithe quite 

ill, 
So he stood before his darling shaking, quaking in a chill. 

"What's the cause, presuming person, that you're here 

to-day?" asked Rose. 
Said the shaking, quaking Algy: "I have come, please, to 

propose." 
Then the maiden shrugged her shoulders ana she laughed 

a little laugh, 
"Get thee gone, presumptious beggar — with your million and 

a half." 

"But I love you," chortled Algy. "That may he," fair Rose 

agreed, 
"But the fact of adoration doesn't meet the present need. 
True, your love is quite poetic in its youthful ardor, yet 
Millionaires are common persons, and they don't go in our 

set." 

"I had dreamed we might be happy," Algy said, and took his 

hat, 
"With my million we'd find comfort in a cozy little flat. " 
"No, the dream has no allurements for my future," answered 

she, 
"Go to work and earn a billion and I'll listen to your plea." 

Algernon departed, vowing, as his air-ship stemmed the gust 
That he'd win that haughty heiress, and the billion, too, or 

bust, 
So he flew to Bull and Bear street with his cash in hand, and 

there 
Quickly plunged in Mars Electric while the stocks were in 

the air. 

Algy might have made his billion, but it grieves me to relate 

That he saw a tragic finish in a manner up-to-date; 

For that day the market trembled with a great financial 

shock. 
And De Smithe was suffocated in a slide of falling stock. 

Moral. 
Millionaires contemporary, don't be proud of rank and 

station. 
For you'll play but second fiddle in your next reincarnation. 
January 1, 1902. WALLACE IRWIN. 



A. de LIZE & FILS 



BORDEAUX. 



Fine Clarets 
and Sauternes 



Im Cases, Quarts, and Pints 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Sole Agents, 
314 Sacramento St., Snn Francisco. 



College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dom- 
inic. Opens August 1, 1901. Full col- 
lege course of studies. Modern Build- 
ing; steam heated. Unsurpassed for 
beauty and healthfullness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

Oollece San Katael, San Rafael. Cal 



Von Meyerinck School 



84I Fl'LTON STREET, 
San Francisco. Tel. Park 223. 



of Music 



Under direction o! 



MRS. ANNA Von MEYERINCK 



Complete Education for church and concert work and the 
Operatic Staere. Advantages unsurpassed. 
Catalogue with full particulars upon application. 

Voice Culture — Mrs. A. Von Meyerinck, Mrs. Decker-Cox 

Opera and Drama — Mrs. Mary Pairweather. Piano — Mr. 

Arthur Fickenscher. Violin and Viola — Mr. George H. Kal- 

thoff. Organ — Dr. Franklin Palmer. 

Special teachers for Languages, Physical Culture, Sight 

Reading, and Ensemble Work. 

San Francisco Writers School Boom 22, roe pom street. 

Press reporting, correspondence and story writing taught in six months- 
Students engaged in other pursuits can take course by mail. Every lesson 
complete. Original composition each day. Five lessons a week. Terms 
810 per month; t50 for court e. Letter containing draft or P.O. order for 
$10 insures return of all lessons for month . 

Moet£t 
Cfrcmdon 

CHAMP <\GNE 

WHITE SEAL and BRUT IMPERIAL 
Celebrated Vintage of J 893 
Unsurpassed in quality. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



:16-218 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




Wand 



CJtolvf 



ty no wand but P/eature's 

— Tom fftxiri. 



San Francisco was the dog Thursday afternoon when Mary 
Mannering tried "Camille" upon us. Miss Mannering did 
not prove herself a great Camille, although a good one. 
She is too intelligent and finished an actress to play any- 
thing poorly, and is probably the most beautiful actress who 
ever played the part, but in Camille she lacks the fragility 
with which Dumas invested every line of his beautiful story; 
she lacks the spirituality necessary to the part — is too 
healthy and alive. This was especially noticeable in the 
first act. Her gayety, instead of being forced and feverish — 
like Blanche Bates', for instance, in the wine-house dance — 
was too much that of a woman contented with the past and 
glad of the promise the future held forth. 

In the scene with Armand, where she knelt at his side 
in the firelight and told of her regrets, hopes and fears, she 
came near the right conception of the part — even more so 
than in the death scene, which, by the way, was admirably 
short. In the interview with Armand's father she did her 
best work, carrying the audience with her by the intensity 
of her emotion. There was nothing mawkish, nothing of the 
snivel about it, but a simulation of grief that kept the house 
in death-like stillness. It was, all through, a performance 
worth seeing — highly pleasoing if not quite satisfying. 

The real triumph of the afternoon was won by Mr. Robert 
Drouet, who played Armand Duval. His acting came as a 
surprise to those who had seen him walk almost indiffer- 
ently through "Janice Meredith." He showed marked ability 
all through, but it was in the fourth act. that the audience 
recognized an actor such as does not appear before us every 
day. His scene in the ball-room alone with Camille was 
carried through with overpowering mastery; and when 
he called the people back and showered her with gold he 
played with a wild, fierce passion, an abandon of feeling 
that held the spectators breathless for a moment, then 
brought them to their feet. It took a dozen curtain calls to 
get him out alone. He appeared in groups, and alone with 
Miss Mannering. She appeared alone, and received plenty 
of applause; but people were clamoring for the new Ar- 
mand. At last he stepped before the curtain with Miss Man- 
nering, and in the few seconds that he stood there after she 
had stepped back, he received the acclaim that the audience 
had been trying for five minutes to give him. 

The work done by the rest of the company was good, es- 
pecially that of Mr. Carl Ahrent, who played Monsieur 
Duval. His every word showed intelligence and a thorough 
mastery of the part. 

* * * 

" 'Tis you I should have murdered, my God what have I 
said!" Then the officer, who had long been shadowing him, 
waiting for just such a confession, which he knew, by all 
the rules of melodrama, was coming, arrested him on the 
spot. He (the villain, of course) sbot himself on a conven- 
ient spot near by, while the good and happily married 
woman came out of the hotel "and embraced her erring sis- 
ter (O, how changed!) and her husband spoke a moral line 
that was smothered back into the hotel by the falling cur- 
tain. 

All this, and much more, happened at the Central, where 
they are playing "The Two Sisters." I thought that because 
Mr. Denman Thompson had a hand in the play (Mr. George 
Ryer was his accomplice) it was to be a production with 
stage grass and yodeling farmhands. But instead it is 
located in the great city of New York, with a scene in Cen- 
tral Park and one act on top of the roofs of high buildings 
— a very pretty scene, by the way. 

In spite of the play not being what was expected, the 
plot is entirely new. A rich villain lures an unsuspecting 
girl away from her home, and then deserts her. The baby 
dies. The villain kills his father, then becomes a wreck, 
while the girl — well, she didn't say where she went, and her 
sister, the hotel-keeper's wife, was wise enough, when she 
showed up, not to ask her. It was just at this juncture that 



the villain came along and made his murderous confession 
and his exit. It's a wonder nobody ever thought of such a 
plot before. 

Seriously, it is strange that men would be willing to put 
their names to such a string of old, bald situations and 
characters. They are all there — the silk-hatted villain, the 
ruined girl who threatened suicide, the good sister, the 
Irishwoman, the policeman, the farmer, the hero, and the 
tramp. And they go through all the maneuvres and speeches 
dear to melodrama. 

There are some rather good people in the Central Theatre 
stock company. Mr. Hallett Thompson played the cowboy 
hero, who wore an evening vest, a King Edward coat, a wide- 
awake hat, and very high, shiny boots. I think that, from 
one or two bits of the play, Mr. Thompson could do good 
work if given a chance. But the Central audiences demand 
a certain style of hero, and in satisfying them Mr. Thompson 
is compelled to slaughter art. 

There is much humor in the first part of "The Two 
Sisters," but toward the end it degenerates into the cheap- 
est kind of wit. Margaret Marshall, who p:ays "Johanna," 
is a perfect type of the jolly, garrulous old Irishwoman. Mr. 
George Webster as "Boozer" makes his usual hit. He has 
the happy faculty of being able to play anything. 

* * * 

When the people who are playing it and the audiences 
who are laughing at it are dust, other mummers will con- 
tinue to play "Charley's Aunt," and other audiences will 
continue to have spasms over its absurd situations. For 
farces it is the record breaker, and deserves its popularity. 
It would be very easy in such a play to overstep the bounds 
of propriety, but the author has made it clean and whole- 
some; it is a string of funny and complicated situations, full 
of good lines. It has been a drawing card for years at the 
Alcazar, and has never been put on in better shape than 
this time. The Alcazar is fortunate at present in having a 
well-balanced stock company. No one in the aggregation 
is mediocre, and some are really brilliant. There may be 
men who could extract more fun out of Lord Babberly than 
Mr. Bacon, but it would be hard to imagine one who could. 
Mr. Alsop and Mr. Shumer, too, contribute their share of 
the fun, and help materially toward the zip and go with 
which the farce is produced. Miss Wycherly, Miss Convere, 
Miss Waldorp and Miss Howe all do admirable work. 

* * * 

The Orpheum retains some of its road show people, and 
they are amusing audiences nightly. Mr. Joe Welch has an 
entirely new lot of Yiddish stories, funnier if possible than 
his others. Elizabeth Murray is one of the nest coon singers 
ever seen at the Orpheum. Her dialect is almost perfect, 
and her voice very pleasing. 

Among the new turns there is a quartette of Liliputians, 
who look like children and do fine comedy work. Ritter's 
trained dogs give a performance full of intelligence. 

W. J. W. 



Mr. Jaques Iuanda, mathematician, will appear at the Or- 
pheum next week. His specialty is giving immediate ans 
wers to all sorts of mathematical questions. Mr. Eddie 
Girard and Jessie Gardner will present a comedy, "The Sou- 
brette and the Cop." The three Westons, musical artists, 
will appear, and Mr. Alt Holt will whistle and give imita- 
tions. Jessie Dale, the girl baritone, will re-appear, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Gardner Crane will give a new sketch. Picolo's 
Lilliputians, Ritter's Dogs, and the biograph make up the 

rest of the bill. 

* * * 

Madame Modjeska and Mr. Louis James will be the at- 
traction at the Columbia next week in "Henry VIII." Sup- 
porting the stars will be a company of about thirty princi- 
ples, including Messrs. Norman Hackett, Thomas Coffin 
Cooke, John Hons, Wadsworth Harris, and Loretta Wells 
and Loia Gale. There will be a chorus of trained voices. 

* * * 

The second of the series of symphony concerts to be given 

under the auspices of the San Francisco Symphony Society 

will be rendered at the Grand Opera House next Friday 

afternoon, January 10th, at 3:15 o'clock. Mr. Paul StelB 

dorff and his orchestra of fifty-five men, with Glulio Mlnettl 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■» r '" '. will gM,. the following pp 

01 Zwel Thuerii 

l.a*s«'n; Symphony N Ulnar, I. Voo B 

Allegro con brio, AndanU eon moto, Allegro (8cl 
Midsummer Night's Dream," M< 
»ohn; Prelude from TMe Ueteterslnger," Wagner; Rone) 

d'Omphnle. Symphoni. poem, 8 Ri n • 

will be ready at Sherman. Clay ft i'o/s next Tueadaj mora 

log at nine o'clock. The final concert of thi i take 

place Friday afternoon, January 17th. 

• • • 

"Little Red Riding Hood" will be kept on at the Tivoll 

Dexl week, and maybe longer. After its run the Tivoll will 
:it Smith and Herberts "The Ameer.'' Anna Llcbter, 
Pnnces Graham and Paul Gordon, a new lyric tenor, have 
been engaged. 

• » • 

"Lost in New York." by Mr. Leonard Grover, will be put 
on at Belasco & Thall's Central Theatre next week. The 
play deals with incidents and scenes in New York. .Miss 
Georgie Cooper will be the heroine, who escapes from an 
asylum by BWlmmlng, in view of the audience, through a 
tank of water. 

• * * 

Next week the Alcazar will present "The Wife," written 
by Messrs. Henry De Mille and David Belasco. Mr. George 
Osborne will make his re-appearance in the role of Silas 
Truman. Miss Juliet Crosby will be Mrs. S. Bellamy Ivers; 
Mr. Howard Scott. Mathew Culver; Mr. M. L. Alsop, the 
Senator; Mr. Paul Gerson, Rutherford; Mr. Frank Bacon, 
Major Henry Putnam. The woman characters will be as- 
signed to Margaret Wycherly, Marion Convere, Oza Waldorp, 
Marie Howe, and Emily Wakeman. 



Arrangements are being made for a convention of general 
advertisers to be held at Delmonico's, New York, on Wednes- 
day and Thursday, January 29th and 30th. An interesting' 
programme, embracing some of the most important ques- 
tions in the field of advertising has been prepared, and it 
is expected that a large number of advertisers from all 
parts of the country will attend. Ther will be a banquet on 
Wednesday evening, at which some of the prominent pub- 
lishers of the country will make addresses. It is expected 
reduced rates will be secured. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the money if 
It fails to cure. is. YV- Gro,e'8 signature is on eHch box. i'rice 25 cents 

If you drink whiskey you want it good or none at all. 

You may be sure of getting the very best if you call for Ar- 
gonaut. It has a smooth, oily consistency and a flavor which 
proclaims its age and purity. The best bars keep it. E. Mar- 
tin & Co., 54 First street, are sole agents for the United 
States. 



Alarms are sent to the Fire Department and to the 

San Francisco Fire Dispatch at the same time. The latter 
notifies you if the fire is at or near your place of business, 
and conveys you to the scene of the fire. 



Zinkand's has become the established meeting place 

of the smart set, especially after the theatre. The fine or- 
chestra, the good food and wines and the perfect cuisine 
make it an ideal place to while away an hour or so. 



Doyen's Champagne, '93, sells for the price of or- 
dinary champagne. Yet it was made in 1893, noted among 
wine men as being one of the very best vintage years. 



If you have not visited Techau Tavern you have 

missed one of the best places in San Francisco. The viands 
and liquors are the best, and the service exceptional. 



Omey & Goetting, stalls 33-34-45-46 California Market, 

always keep on hand the best fruits and vegetables in sea- 
son. Their goods are always fresh. 



Get some Japanese goods and curios for your cosy 

corner. George T. Marsh & Co., 214 Post street, keep the 
largest and most varied stock in town. 



ivuii \JOKid I lOUSc. PnrBrlrttrr end Mtnini 

In*" »t « «h«rp! Mmlni-e Maliinlav at Julian.! The Heuon'a 

LITTLE RED RIDING MOOD 
Omntaa run amkrr. 
Poiinlur orlcci— 25. 50. and 75 cents. Telephone Rush ». 

Ornkonm S *" 1 ' r » n cl»C"V Orcatoiu Mualo Hall. 
I U'lCUIII. O'Farrell St.. between Htocrton and Powell street*. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, January ■">. 

,'ic» [uandir Ed lie <ilr,ir.i and Jessie Oardnor; The Three Wea- 
iohh; aii. Holt: Jea»ie Uale; Mr. and Mr«. Gardner Crane: The Blo- 

Kniuli, Hitter's Trained Does; and Plcolo's Lillputlsns, 

Reserved seats. 25c: Balcony 10c: r.pera chairs and hox seats. 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 



Alcazar Theatre. B "- A " co "^""p^T^ 



254 

threat play of 



Commencing Monday, Jan G. Relaaco and De Millc't 
American society and political life. 

THE WIFE 

in which will appear the popular favorite, Mr. George Osbourne, in 

the role of Silas Truman. 

Regular Matinee Saturday and Sunday. Secure seats in advance by 

telephoning to Box Office, Main 254. 

v*nce- Prices, 15j. 25c. 35c. 50c and 75c. 

Golumbia Theatre. O0TTL011, iJ£ B " e f ft ( n ° M » Iia(cerf4 . 

Beginning Next Monday. Extraordinary Event. 

MODdESKft and cJMMES 

and an incomparable company, in 

HENRY VIII. 

The most complete, sumptuous and scholastic production ever shown 

in this city. 

Piices-31.50. Si. 75c, 50c, 35c and 25c. 

Grand Opera House. — SPECIAL 

Friday Afternoon, Jan 10, at 3 15 sharp. Second Sijmbhonu Concert 
under the auspices of the 

SAN FRANGISGO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 
Path. Steindobff, Director. 

Orchestra of Fifty-five musicians. GiULro Minktti. Coneertmelster, 
Reserved seats: 81.50. 31.00, 75c and 50c, On shIo at Sherman. Clay & 
Co.'* Tuesday morning. January 7t'i, at 9 o'clock. LAST CONCERT 
FRIDAY AFTERNOON JAN. 17- 

BELASGO and 0^~4-~^l TL„-L~~ on Market St. near 

thall's L/entral I neatre. sth.opp.cuy Han 

Week commencing Monday, Jan. 6. Leonard Qrover's most success- 
ful of a'l modern Aim .rican melodramas, 

LOST IIS NEW YORK 

Realistic seen. s. characters and incidents from metropolitan life. 
Regular Matinees Saturday and Sunday- Prices Matinees— 10c, 15c, 
and 25c. No higher. Evenings — 10c, 15c, 25c, 35c, and 50c. Phone 
South 533. 




-Don't drjnk Jesse Moore Whiskey unless you want the best. 



RAGING! 

EVERY WEEK DAY, RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 
Races start at 2:15 p. m- sha**p. 

F.rryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1. 1:30. 2:30 and 3 p. m„ 
connecting with trains stopping at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferry ickets to Shell Mound. Last two cars on train reserved for ladies 
and their escorts. No smoking. All trains via Oakland Mole connect with 
Han Pablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadway, Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue electric cars at 
.Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric cars go direct to the 
track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning— Trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 p. m, and immediately 
after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, Jr.. President. 
R. B. MELROY, Secretary. 

After the Theatre 

Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the Hnem 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Ib society's gathering place alter the theatre 
la over 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




It would seem that there could be 
George Washington, little new data in regard to George 
Washington, so much has been 
written on the subject, and so exhaustively have biographers 
gone over the field during the past century. Mr. Norman 
Hapgood, the author of "Abraham Lincoln: The Man of the 
People," manages very ably to invest an old subject with 
new interest by copious quotations from letters written by 
Washington himself as well as by his contemporaries. Wash- 
ington's schooling ended at sixteen, and shortly afterwards 
he became public surveyor of Culpeper County, living with 
his brother at Mount Vernon. In very mature style does he 
record his first experiences as a "woodsman," in a letter 
written at that time. Some of the more interesting passages 
from Washington's journal, treating of his journey over the 
mountains in 1747, are given in facsimile, as is also his 
opinion of the field officers of the Revolution alive in 1791. 
Mr. Hapgood notes the fact that while Washington made 
enemies in his life, he left none at his death, and that his 
bitterest opponents became in time his eulogists. In sum- 
ming up his life and character the writer says: "If Washing- 
ton's name is as great as any in the annals of political 
history it is because of deeds which the world values now 
even more than it did a hundred years ago. His was a noble 
nature, with a sanity, a balance, a power of endurance sel- 
dom rivaled; but his glory is not mainly personal. It is not 
primarily the effulgence of some rare and individual super- 
iority. It is universal. It is the concentration in a man or 
those merits which are most needed in the rulers of man- 
kind. It is the triumph of integrity, of patience, of cour- 
age, of loyalty, at the service of his country. It is because 
he was with constancy for the right, and so powerful in its 
service that he has such honor from the world." Several 
interesting portraits of Wpshington are given, and a good 
index supplements a work that has distinctive merit and in- 
terest. 

The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. Price 
$1.76. 

There is oftentimes a great deal in 
The Billy Stories, the dedication of a book. The one 
before us — "The Billy Stories," by 
Eva Lovett — reads: "To every boy and girl in the United 
States who hates to go to bed when bed-time comes." And wno 
ever saw or heard of one that really did like to go to bed when 
bed-time came? The Billy of this story always coaxed from 
his soft-hearted mamma an extra half hour in the evening 
when the dreaded nine o'clock came, and exerted all his 
imagination to tell such an entertaining story that his 
mother would willingly put off the bed-time in order to 
hear the end of his wonderful yarn. The result was a humor- 
ous and amusing set of stories told from a boy's point of 
view. Billy, in the role of pirate, policeman, tramp, tiger 
hunter, cowboy, castaway, etc., will furnish amusement for 
other boys, and for girls as well, who delight to read about 
weird adventures or visit in fancy the North Pole and other 
out-of-the-way places. It is well illustrated with half tones, 
and a charming picture of Billy serves as frontispiece. 
J. F. Taylor & Co.. Publishers, New York, Price, $1.00. 

Much has been written on the disci- 
Paths to Power, pline required to accomplish a purpose. 
The Hon. Floyd B. Wilson in "Paths to 
Power," presents in a series of papers a method which he 
claims to have tested and proven to be practical, and to 
teach the scholar of to-day how to use his own faculties to 
the best of his abilities is the aim of the book. "One's 
Atmosphere," "Growth," "A Psychic Law in Student Work," 
"Unfoldment," "Power: How to Attain It," "Harmony," 
"The Assertion of the I," are the titles of the first seven 
papers, and give some clue to the wnole. 
R. F. Fenno & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.00. 



The main interest of Mr. Alfred 
The New Americans. Hodder's book, "The New Ameri- 
cans," lies not so much in the 
plot as iu its portrayal of the young men of the day. They 
are shown as a product gui veneris, full of audacity, deter- 
mination and intelligence, with little old-time chivalry about 
them. The story deals with me conflict between the pur- 
poses and ideals of the old generation and of the new, and 
with the different points of view of the men and women of 
the new America, and with the hard unsentimentality which 
for the present distinguishes both its men and women. There 
is much analytical character study in the book, the dramatis 
pcrsonae are clever and well-bred, and the story is strongly. 
told, but let us hope that Mr. Hodder's young men, even 
though they be university-bred, are not the typical young 
men of this generation. As a whole the book is unsatisfac- 
tory and wearisome. 

The Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York, price, $1.50. 

"A Collection of Poems in Patches" 

Pebbles and Pearls, is the not altogether inappropriate 
sub-title which Mr. Cleland Kerne- 
staffe has given to his over-voluminous collection of verse, 
which, for some not obvious reason, he calls "Pebbles and 
Pearls." Possibly he counted upon "apt alliteration's artful 
aid" to foist upon an unsuspecting public a conglomeration 
of would-be witticisms, bad puns and worse rhymes. To 
sift Mr. Kernestaffe's "jewels from his jokes" is no easy 
matter, his "pearls" are few and far between, while a pro- 
fusion of italics, and a mass of double* nlcml-re seem to be 
his main stock in trade. Were we addicted to the use of 
slang we should pronounce the writer's "pebbles," as well 
as everything else about the book, decidedly "rocky." 

F. Tennyson Neely Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 
$1.20. 

A plot to abduct the Queen of Charles II 

Mark Everard. and what came of it, forms the nucleus 
of Mr. Knox Magee's romance, "Mark 
Everard." The action all takes place within a fortnight 
Master Everard and his faithful servant Toby are in the 
thick of many a fight, but come unscathed through no end 
of thrilling encounters. In the end, notwithstanding plots 
and counterplots and many social barriers, the hero wins 
the heart and hand of the noble lady to whom he has ren- 
dered a great service, and all ends well. Mr. Magee will be 
remembered as the author of "With Ring of Shield," which 
saw the light last year. 

R. F. Fenno & Co., Publishers, New York, Price, $1.50. 
Mrs. Gabrielle E. Jackson's stories 

The Colburn Prize. in the St. Nicholas, have won for 
her a warm place in the hearts of 
the young people of the country. "The Colburn Prize" is 
the latest story from the pen of the author of "Denise and 
Ned Toddles" and "Pretty Polly Perkins." It tells of the 
devotion of two young friends, and is dedicated to "The 
School Girls Throughout the Land." It is bound with 
taste, and has some charming illustration. 

J. F. Taylor & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.00. 

Bound in dainty and most attractive 

California Violets, fashion, Mrs. Grace Hibbard's little 
book of verse, "California Violets,'" 
compels attention and invites perusal. Nor will its contents 
prove disappointing, although many of the poems are in a 
minor key, and will appeal more especially to those who have 
loved and lost. They are not all of a high order nor fault- 
less in form, but they ring true and are rich in tender, sym- 
pathetic passages. 

A. M. Robertson, Publisher, San Francisco. Price, $1.00. 



Books Received. — John Lane: "The Field of Clover." by 
Laurence Houseman, price, $1.25. 

MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 126 



Post Street 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




'Metr tfx Cricr>'.*faf 0>t devil art M*u 
I i'O* fAjf miltpUy tht dtwl, j/r. wrthyou ' 




own \~rier 



It was a very nervous man 

Who strode torth New Year's eve. 

He wore a helmet on his head 
Ami padding, vest and sleeve. 

His overcoat was rubber-tired. 

His ears were stopped with glue, 
He wore asbestos spectacles, 

Pneumatic trowsers, too. 

But when he stood upon the street 

And all the fun began, 
They didn't do a thing to him. 

That timid, nervous man. 

They broke him into ninety bits 

And left the pieces dead. 
"It was a quiet New Year's eve," 

The morning papers said. 

A few weeks ago I referred to the numerous so-called tur- 
key raffles which have sprung up during the holiday season 
all over the Barbary Coast. I again repeat that if Chief 
Wittman wishes to win laurels for his new position, let him 
take an axe and do the Carrie Nation act on the big wooden 
balls used in this game. It is safe betting thaf he will find 
most of them heavily loaded with quicksilver, so that cer- 
tain numbers are bound to come up more frequently than 
others. It cost the Crier just one dollar to find out how 
the game is worked, but he regards the investment as a 
profitable one. Also, he was flattered by being mistaken for 
a detective. The proprietor of the dive, a big, husky man, 
sat behind the counter, rolling the ball with persistent en- 
ergy, though there were but two apparent customers in 
the place. These two, who were certainly confederates, 
held three paddles each, the balance being disposed on the 
counter for the benefit of any unwary stranger who might 
drop in. The luck of these two men was wondrous to be- 
hold — they won nearly every time, but I did not. The first 
time the proprietor ostentatiously paid over a dollar to the 
winner, but then, seeing my eagle eye upon them, the gang 
grew suspicious, and after that the winners invariably de- 
manded turkeys. After watching a few minutes I discovered 
that two and ten turned up more frequently than any of the 
other fourteen numbers. As both these lucky numbers were 
held by the confederates, and as they obstinately refused to 
part with them, I came to the conclusion that it was best 
to quit. But if a man could manage to get hold of one of 
these numbers he could build a Nob Hill mansion out of his 
earnings. 

Of course I carry unlimited life insurance. I seriously 
object, however, to its premature distribution, as most of 
my heirs are not sufficiently matured to appreciate to the 
full as yet my wise provision for their future welfare. This 
reflection is caused by the imminent danger of my devoted 
head being made the buffer of one or more of the window 
cleaners engaged on our tall buildings. Three of them 
have been observed standing on their tiptoes on the eighth 
or ninth story window sills engaged in the aerial gymnastics 
of their calling, without as much as a rope between them and 
the immaculate Christmas silk tile of the Crier. Now, in 
view of these elevated facts, the contingency referred to in the 
opening line of this paragraph is perfectly evident. A mere 
window cleaner more or less is of course of no consequence 
to the holders of investments like ten, fifteen or twenty story 
business blocks. But imagine the disturbance of all proper 
invoices in the New Year's accounts if aught should happen 
to the only functionary qualified for the ancient office of 
Town Crier. 



I see thai the Examlnei is taking 

near Fourth has moved <<> upper Dnponl street, The truth 
of the case is that the only Immorality In ibis shov 
the Cad thai the operators were taking from the public 
thing fur nothing. Thi rs" outside duped the 

farmers Into entering In the expectatii f seeing s "red 

hoi show." it Is a pure case of ol 

preten show Inside is mild compared to the ordln 

ary phonographic peep shows flourishing all over town, 

A lady who lost several hundred dollars in the wrei 
the steamer San Rafael, complains that In trying to have hei 
loss reimbursed by the North Pacific Coast Railroad Com 
pany she has been totally unable to gain an audience with 
President John B. Stetson. Why. my dear lady, don't you 
know that the mention of money to be patd out scares the 
President and stockholders of this toy railroad half to 
death? Anything over two dollars makes them blink and 
swallow hard, and when hundreds are mentioned they sim- 
ply get into the woods. Reflect a moment: to pay your 
claim of a few hundred dollars they would have to sell three 
or four of their wheezy, antiquated locomotives — if they 
have that many, which I doubt. 

Age does not always bring wisdom. Witness the case of 
Mrs. N. J. Foote, who is credited with half a century of life. 
She started out to have a good time the other night, visit- 
ing several public resorts. In one of them she met a woman 
whom she liked, and they had sundry drinks together. Then 
they met the new woman's brother. The upshot of the whole 
racket was that Mrs. Foote was assaulted in her room by the 
pair, had her jaw broken, and was robbed of $400 in money 
and jewels. I find that I cannot muster up any sympathy 
for Mrs. Foote. When a woman old enough to be a grand- 
mother goes around town on a boozing expedition she has 
something coming, and should not be surprised at receiving 
it. 

Small-calibre people can sometimes make a sensation, as 
is the case with a couple of half-baked idiots up in Spokane, 
Washington. The man in the case, whose name is Reno, 
sent a young lady named Mercier a coffin for a Christmas 
present. In the uproar that followed this clammy gift the 
fact has been brought out that the girl recently took an oath 
not to flirt or go to picnics or dances for a year, praying to 
be stricken blind if she indulges in those horrible crimes. I 
recommend that this Christmas coffin be rigged up with a 
spade for a rudder and a shroud for a sail, and that this 
congenial couple be compelled to sail in it for some distant 
— far distant — uninhabited island. 

'Twas on the happy New Year's tide 

That Stanford's young Philanders 
Lined up to play for glory's sake 

Against the Michiganders. 
But glory looks less bright to-day 

To each red-sweatered hero, 
Who got his glory at the price 

Of forty-nine to zero. 

Since Mr. Rafael Weill, Mr. Silvain Weill, Mr. Adolph 
Roos, and many other reputable gentlemen, have seen fit to 
withdraw from the Cercle Francais, it seems to the Crier 
that it is high time that club was reorganized under a new 
name. I do not doubt that there are plenty of citizens of 
good standing yet remaining in the Cercle Francais, which 
is now about as French as a Hamburg eel, but I strenuously 
maintain that it is up to them to get out of that circle. 
There are plenty of Frenchmen in San Francisco high 
enough in the business and artistic world to make a French 
society that is worth the name and can keep its members 
out of the police courts. 

Practical jokers nearly always get the worst of it, as 
should he the case. A late instance is that of Congress- 
man James McLachlan, of Pasadena, who, as a joke, at- 
tempted to steal a turkey from a New York farmer friend, 
and came within an ace of being pitchforked by a brawny 
hired man. Such little happenings discourage practical 
jokers, which is a very good thing. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



LiOokorOn 



« 



g »M ,...- i . 




Mr. W. J. Kelly, who is chief of the Call's staff of artists, 
received a surprise the other night from the bewilderment 
and other effects of which he is just recovering. 

Mr. Harry Warren, the Call's cartoonist, was the insti- 
gator of the affair. He approached Mr. Kelly and told him 
of a couple of charming young ladies with whom he had 
become acquainted, and said that he had received permission 
to call; also that after telling them of Mr. Kelly's many 
charming qualities, he had been not only asked but urged 
to bring him along. He dilated so on the beauty and lovely 
dispositions of the young ladies that Mr. Kelly was very 
eager to make the visit. To get away from the office in time 
was the next question. So he went to the management of 
the paper and stated that, as the staff had been working 
very hard during the holidays, they should be let off earlier. 
This was agreed to, and on the night in question the Call's 
art department was deserted at 9 o'clock. 

The surprise took place at the home of Mr. Frank Roh- 
rand, another member of the staff. The artists and several 
friends went there as quickly as possible arter they had 
been released from their toil. At about 10:30 a hack rolled 
up, and Messrs. "Warren and Kelly alighted. They were 
received by Mrs. Rohrand's domestic and a young man who 
had agreed to don feminine garb for the occasion. Mr. Kelly 
was introduced to them, and they were shown into a dimly- 
lighted parlor. Mr. Kelly was just getting on friendly 
terms with the serving maid and Mr. Warren seemed to be 
progressing swimmingly with his disguised friend, when the 
folding doors flew open and the whole art staff and friends 
burst in upon them. Mr. Kelly was told that this was a sur- 
prise given in his honor, and was asked to pardon the 
round-about way by which it was accomplished. Refresh- 
ments were brought out, a bountiful supper was spread, and 
the affair was voted a success from start to finish. 

* * * 

Mr. Ned Hamilton has left the Bohemian Club, and it was 
feared there could be no jinks without him. However, the 
Cnristmas jinks was a great success, because of the unex- 
pected talent of a star that appeared for the first time Sat- 
urday evening last — Mr. Charles K. Field, formerly of Stan- 
ford, but now engaged in the insurance business. This week 
the members are worshiping a new wit. 

Mr. Stafford, the coal dealer, is chaffed because he writes 
poetry, dabbles in art, and is the butt of the wits of the club. 
Bohemians find these accomplishments incongruous with 
selling coal. Mr. Stafford is a university man, and by edu- 
cation and equipment is as well fitted for the position he 
holds as any member of the club. 

But Mr. Field appeared on the stage with a little red 
book which he declared was a neglected volume of Mr. 
Stafford's verse. One poem he called "Night Thoughts on 
Coal Dust." His manner was excellent and his comments 
were full of humor and wit. In the low jinks, which was the 
best the club ever had, a wit sprung gags on either side 
of Mr. Lansing Mizner, late of Dawson. As Mr. Mizner is 
several hundredweight better than a living skeleton, the 
club wits had some fun at his expense. "Why are we like 
the Siamese twins?" was the question propounded. "Be- 
cause we have a fatty tissue between us," came the response 
that raised a laugh. 

* * • 

' Maclay, you are in the stocks, and all the people of this 
entire United States are pointing their finger at you as they 
pass you in scornful view. The Lookeron has just made 
the discovery that you are a Calif ornian! As a bare- 
footed boy you gathered wild violets in the Santa Clara Val- 
ley, and you may even have defamed Alvlso Creek by 
bathing in it. Now, sir, there was an ancient custom in the 
empire of the Shogum that when a son of one of the chlet 



provinces of the Shogum's realm had become totally impos- 
sible, a liveried servant of the imperial household was des- 
patched to the abode of the unmentionable, bringing with 
him a blade far keener than the far-famed Damascus. No 
appeal was ever made from this decision. Your father was 
an honored member of our State Legislature once — and uow! 
Do you remember one Colonel Henry in the Dreyfus affair? 
How you resemble him — except when he was found out he 
did not further enlarge on his craven cowardice by appeal- 
ing to a civil or military board of service, but permanently 
removed his worthless life beyond all jurisdiction. You can 
render your country and especially our State just one ser- 
vice before you permanently exile yourself — say to Kam- 
schatka. Through whom did you, "a laborer" at the Navy- 
Yard in New York, receive the order to write an official text- 
book for the Naval Academy? And how did this particular 
volume happen to be the one that contained what is alleged 
to be the official account of the naval battle at Santiago. 
Secretary Long, it is up to you, sir, bluest-blooded backbay 
Bostonian; corrector and censor of the syntax and grammar 
of the messages of our late revered martyr President; mem- 
ber of the Reform Wing of Massachusetts Republicans; 
ex-Governor; translator of Virgil. Pray tell us, sir, -before 
the New Year has grown stale and hackneyed — did your 
blue-blooded nose, your sensitive, syntax nerves, smell noth- 
ing, sense nothing at all, of the fact that the national Navy 
Academy of which you are ex-offlcio chief had become a 
"school for scandal," smelling to high heaven? "Long's 
resignation forthcoming," say Washington telegrams. Very 
well indeed. Suppose you and Maclay hire Dumont's balloon 
and together set out to discover the canals on Mars? Please 
don't report till you return with one of the spades that dug 
them! 

• * * 

Bishop Nichols has just told me the story of a bright pun 
made by Bishop Potter when he was here on the recent Epis- 
copal Convention. 

As is well known, Bishop Potter while here made his head- 
quarters at the home of Mr. W. H. Crocker, on Nob Hill, 
Two men were passing it one morning, and one of them said 
jestingly to the other, pointing to the mansion: 

"Here is Crocker's Pottery." 

Bishop Potter, unperceived by them, was just coming 
down the steps. He heard the remark, and, advancing, said 
smilingly: 

"Excuse me. gentlemen, but this is Potter's Crockery." 

• * • 

When Sarah Bernhardt was here she created a sensation 
by wearing white satin gowns from morning to night, . 
whether at breakfast or dinner. Some of these were quilted 
and some unlined, and she changed them at a moment's 
notice according to the temperature of the room. In the 
aftermath of opera chatter the news comes that Calve, while 
in San Francisco, used only white silk bedding trimmed with 
heavy white lace. Her pillow covers were of the same rich 
material, and so she went Bernhardt one better. Anything 
but white silk next the flesh of the world's greatest Carmen 
would bring on an attack of nerves, necessitating a trip to 

the south. 

• » » 

An amusing story comes to me from San Jose of "spook" 
journalism. The Herald and Mercury have just been pur- 
chased by the Hays brothers, the sons of Mrs. Chenowyth, 
the spiritualist, who has a splendid place near the town. 
The Hays brothers are lawyers, but their legal training 
does not prevent them from having the greatest faith in the 
miraculous feats of their mother. Mrs. Chenowyth gained 
fame and fortune years ago by locating a fabulously rich 
gold mine. Not long since she inherited another fortune, 
and so she has money to burn, and the modern way of burn- 
ing money is to purchase newspapers. However, Mrs. Cheno- 
wyth has the better of her rivals, for she is in constant com- 
munication with "spooks." 

On all the big dailies there is a morning council of the 
editors. In San Jose Mrs. Chenowyth has a council of her 
sons and the spooks. When they want to find out about 
doubtful editorial policy or the employment of an editor, 
Mrs. Chenowyth goes into a trance and decides for them. 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



If there Is a sick cow or horse on the i wyth 

calls up the next world and asks what Is to b* doni 
It. There Is no doubt but she has a cinch on DVWB, to 
has the press dispatches and the other world ns well It 
will be taril—lllll if UM Mercury and llemlil will but pub- 
llsh Interviews with the departed spirits of Shakes: 
Bonaparte, and our late President. Spook journalism will 
then be a great Improvement on the yellow. 

• • • 

.Mr. Morton, principal of the Ixiweil High School, he 
sued an edict prohibiting the male pupils from escorting 
pntty girl pupils to and from school. The other day he 
became aware of the fact that a certain young couple Bi 
to be totally ignorant of the law. He called the male 
c.ffendcr before him and charged him with the crime. 

"She's my cousin." offered the youth ia defense. 

The principal was suspicious. He had the young lady 
brought before him. "Are you Mr. Blank's cousin?" he aske.l 
sternly. 

The girl blushed, then tittered. "No-o," she said, "but 
I — er — might become a sort of relative of his some day." 

But Mr. Mortan still maintains that the calves of the 
Lowell High School must not meander homeward in pairs. 

* * • 

Mr. Thomas Rickard, of the Bohemian Club, has in his 
Oakland residence a sort of private office fitted up with a 
telephone and other commercial conveniences. Mr. Rickard 
also has a son about two and a half years old, who is of 
an investigating disposition. For that reason he is not al- 
lowed in the room mentioned, and a settee is placed across 
the doorway of the office to keep him out. 

One day, shortly before Christmas, Mrs. Rickard heard 
the youngster coming up the stairs talking to himselr. 
Reaching the door of the office he attempted to remove the 
s°ttee. It was hard work, but at last he removed it suffi- 
ciently to admit of squeezing into the room. His mother 
watched him, and saw him move a chair up to the telephone. 
Clambering up he took the receiver from the hook and held 
it to his ear. 

"I want Santy Claus," he said firmly. 

Central evidently entered into the spirit of the thing, for 
after a few seconds the youngster said: 

"Hello, is vis Santy Claus? Well, I want a choo-choo en- 
gine and a train of cars for C'ismas. Can you 'member vat, 
Santy Claus? A choo-choo engine and a train of cars. 
Fanks. Good-bye." 

He then hung up the receiver, put the chair in its right 
place, and, after coming out, replaced the settee and toddled 
innocently down stairs. He got what he wanted for Christ- 
mas. He says he knew Santa Claus would bring it, but 
hasn't said a word about his telephonic interview with the 
Saint. 



BUGHOUSE PROVERBS. 



I: is more blessed to give than to deceive. 
A stitch in nine saves time. 

You may lead a horse to slaughter, but you can't make 
him think. 
A king-may laugh at a cat. 
The early worm catches the fish. 
All that titters is not cold. 
Money makes the hair go. 

It takes nine tailors to make a man pay his bills. 
It is a wise son that knows his own mother-in-law. 
Honesty is the best poverty. 
The rolling moss gathers no stones. 
Procrastination is the chief of crimes. 

W. A. I. 



Stops the Cough and Works Off the Cold. 

Laxative Bromo-Quinine Tablets cure a cold In on c 

Price 25 cants. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Pears' 

It is a wonderful soap 
that takes hold quick and 
docs no harm. 

No harm ! It leaves the 
skin soft like a baby's ; no 
alkali in it, nothing but 
soap. The harm is done by 
alkali. Still more harm is 
done by not washing. So, 
bad soap is better than 
none. 

What is bad soap? Im- 
perfectly made; the fat 
and alkali not well bal- 
anced or not combined. 

What is good soap ? 
Pears'. 

Sold all over the world. 



R.uii\©Lrt 



CHAMPAGNE 



RUINART pere et fils, RHEIMS, France 
Established in J 729 

HUBERT BROS.. 21321s market street 

AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 



C. H. If REHNSTROM 

(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 



TAILOR 



PKelan Bldg.Tel Main 5387 



San Francisco, Gal. 



Jesse Moore "Whiskies are famous the world over for purity 

and flavor as well as for all the other qualities that make good 
whiskey. 



This man is fav- 
ored with two of 
the greatest bles- 
sings that can be 
bestowed — one 
on the seat be- 
side him, the 
other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

Studebaher, market and tenth »t». 

German, French, and Music I c.ssong Given. 
Native teacher. Private lessons, 81.00. Class lessons, 25o. Piano lessons 
Sl.BO. Miss Bruning. member or the German Teacher's Association, in 
London. 1724 Clay Street, San Francisco. 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




Never has a year opened more auspiciously. During the 
whole month of January there is hardly a disengaged hour 
day or night, so many and so varied are the diversions 
planned by the t.mart set to while away the time, and Feb- 
ruary is being absorbed so rapidly that there promises 
to be a crush of affairs until the Mardi Gras festivity proves 
a brilliant wind-up to the season of 1901-1902. The clubs 
have been busy with their holiday entertainments the past 
week, the Bohemian, the Cosmos and the Press Clubs all 
doing their level best in the way of dinners, smokers, and 
jinks performances to outshine each other. According to 
the maidens, however, the San Francisco Verein and the 
Concordia chose the wiser plan, and had dancing to finish 
up with on New Year's eve; and the Entre Nous Club dance 
was the very jolliest as well as one of the prettiest of the 
season. Terpsichore has ruled this week, and was certainly 
in great form on Tuesday evening. Besides the club dances 
there was the ball Mrs. Horace Hill gave in honor of her 
young son at Century Hall, and the gathering of the Misses 
Spreckels in their beautiful new home. All of these were 
kept up with so much spirit that it is a marvel the partici- 
pants had a foot to stand upon when they greeted the dawn 
on New Year's morning. The.e was a dance at Blingum on 
Wednesday evening, and last evening the Friday Fortnight- 
lies had their fourth cotillion of the season, besides the 
vaudeville performance and dance at Mrs. McCutcheon's. 
On Tuesday, Founders' Day was celebrated by the Call 
fornia Club, when the hit of the occasion was the "Knicker- 
bocker Dames," a little skit written by Mrs. Lovell White 
and Mrs. Ella Sexton, and performed by several of the mem- 
bers for the amusement of their guests. There appears to 
be an effort made to revive the old-time custom of Ne-.v 
Year's calls, and from the success attained last Wednesday 
there is no doubt it will have more extended vogue next 
year. The elders of the swim will tell you with what pleas- 
ant anticipations the New Year's call was ,'ooked forward to 
the whole year through, and until the custom was abused 
it was a delightful institution for the ladies who received 
and the men who paid the visits. But the calling nowadays 
is not to be confined to the male elements; the ladies also 
will take their share of it, and perhaps that will be the bet- 
ter plan. Miss Leontine Blakeman gave an egg nogg party 
on New Year's day, and Mrs. Eleanor Martin kept open 
house all afternoon. 

Between the Blingum charity ball (as it is called) next 
Wednesday evening, the dance at Mrs. McNear's on Thurs- 
day evening, and the second meeting of La Jeunesse Club 
on Friday evening, what a week th° coming one will be for 
dancing! The first of the Greenway dances on the follow- 
ing Thursday evening, the 16th, gives every indication of 
being among the successes~of the season, and on the 17th 
the Friday Fortnightlies will be again on band. 

Miss Pearl Sabin's visit has given great pleasure to her 
friends, and they regret losing her so soon again. Miss 
Pearl gave a delightful Japanese luncheon last Tuesday to 
a dozen of her more intimate girl friends, and yesl* 
depatted for her home in Chicago. 

Among to-day's luncheons will be one given by Miss Stella 
Fortmann at the Palace Hotel, after which she and her 
guests will take in the matinee at the Columbia Theatre 
This afternoon Mrs. Henry Newhall will give a tea at her 
residence on Clay street. Next Friday Mrs. Ed. Pond will 
emerge from her year's seclusion, and give the first of a 
series of luncheons which will inaugurate her re-appearance 
in the social world. Next Saturday Mrs. Brice and Miss 
Gertrude Goewey will be among the tea givers at their resi- 
dence on Page street, when the recent debutante. Miss Kate 
Brigham. will be guest of honor. 

There was a quiet wedding at St. Stephen's Church last 
Sunday afternoon, when Miss Agnes Beveridge and Mr 



Arthur Oliver, of London, were united in marriage by the 
Rev. E. J. Lion. There were no attendants, and only the 
most intimate friends of the family were present at the 
ceremony. The pretty bride, who was given away by 
her father, Mr. Horatio Beveridge, wore a handsome tailor- 
made gown of blue cloth with a becoming hat to correspond. 
After their honoymoon trip the young couple will reside 
in Southern California. 

One of the merriest dances of the New Year's eve was 
that given by Major Hooper to his guests at the Occidental 
Hotel. The music and supper were both excellent, and 
hugely enjoyed by the many present. 

While there are for the moment no weddings on the tapis, 
the future is full of promise in that line. One of January's 
weddings will be that of Miss India Scott and Mr. Arthur 
Spear, the 25th being the date set for the ceremonial, which 
will take place at the home of the bride's aunt on California 
street. 

The hop at the Presidio last, week was a particularly pleas- 
ant one; not only was it a trifle more informal than usual, 
but the jolliest of the young set were there, and the dance 
was prolonged later than is customary at that Post, owing 
to its being holiday time. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael: Mr. J. N. Fritch, Mr. J. N. Bene- 
dict and wife. Miss Stella Zefferes, Mr. F. S. Glass, Mr. C. 
A. Burchard. Mr. John Piver and wife, Mrs. Anderson, Miss 
Anderson. Mr. P. Stein and wife, Mrs. S. B. Schloss, Mr. J. 
H. Polhemus, Mr. R. D. Merrill, wife and son, Mr. J. Bly 
and wife, Mr. and Mrs. George E. Starr, Mrs. E. B. Davis. 
Mr. J. E. Morse, Mr. T. Ena, Mr. Richard Sperry, Mr. F. A. 
Schrader and wife, Mrs. E. B. Whiteside. 

They say that the most gorgeous favors for the projected 
cotillion are to be brought back by the Flood party on their 
return from the brief visit to New York on which they have 
just departed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Tevis have been spending the holidays 
with Mrs. Susan G. Tevis at her home on Taylor street; 
Mrs. Hunter of Kentucky is passing the winter with her 
sister. Mrs. M. S. Latham and "Milty," the Misses Beatrice 
and Celia Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Knight, Miss Sophie 
Pierce, Miss Ollie Holbrook, Miss Virginia Joliffe, Miss 
Helen Wagner, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Griffin and Mr. Clar- 
ence Follis were among those who spent the New Year at 
Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Breedon. nee Butler, are looked for upon 
their return early next month; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Parrott 
and their daughters will be back with us ere long, but con- 
template spending some time at Del Monte directly after 
their arrival; Mrs. Nelly Hyde-Smith, Mr. H. E. Huntington 
and Miss Clara, are among recent arrivals from the East. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank C. Pague have been spending the 
Christmas holidays in Southern California, passing Christ- 
mas week at the Hotel Del Coronado and the past week in 
Los Angeles, stopping at the New Hotel Angelus. They were 
the first guests to register there on the opening of that 
new hostelry. 

The guests at Hotel Del Monte had a merry time on New 
Years. The Easterners who are staying there cannot recover 
from their surprise at our mild midwinter weather. ' 



A Skia of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Molh Patches, Hush and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 53 years and is ho harmless wo 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
A,CQOp1 no counterfeit of si nil lar name. 
Dr. L. A.Sayre snid to & lady of the 
haut-lon(ft patient): "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend 'Gour* 
nud's Crcain' as the least harmful oi 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druciri^ts and I'aiicy-jroods 
Dealers in tho United States, Canada* 
and Kuropfc, 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Oreat Jones street, N. Y. 



January 4, 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



ON THE BOAT. 



By Helen D. Richardson. 

There ia a sound of churning waters, a succession of mild 
jars, and we are moving out l.ito the bay! 

How deliciously claw the day is! It was just like this 
the afternoon I first crossed. I remember the sunlight 

shifting on the waves like that: the far distntu 
of the Berkeley hills: the peculiar whiteness of the Hoi k 
of sails hovering about the Sa.i Francisco shore. 1 am 
sorry that the little Italian band travels on these boats no 
more: this scene is always associated in my mind with the 
strains of a harp anil violin anil the chink of dimes and 
nickels on a little lacquered plate. 

There Is a perceptible chill in the air though the sun 
is bright. I thought those people out front would feel it. 
This young couple that have just come aft evidently want to 
take these seats vacated by the old gentleman and little girl 
that went inside. I guess I can move along a little and make 
more room. No. I didn't expect them to thank me — they 
are too busy talking. 

In the short glance politeness permits me to take. I see 
that she is handsome in a large way, and wears a snug black 
tailor suit, with a black and white hat that lifts fashionably 
on one side. He is smallea than she, with plain, serious tea 
Hires and brown eyes that see nothing but the woman in 
front of him. I notice that he carries a dress suit case 
marked: 'A. C. F.— X. Y." 

Ah, I think, a transcontinental honeymoon! I learn from 
their conversation presently however that I am mistaken. 
They are married but he is returning from an Eastern trip 
and sne has been over to Sixteenth street to meet him. 
How sweet her violets smell! My! I'm glad I did move 
along. 

I wonder, now, who this second man is that has just 
come up. They call him "Dick." He is very much handsomer 
than the other man and wears a long light overcoat that 
hangs loose from the shoulders. 

"Sorry there isn't more room," says the husband, eyeing 
the narrow space to his right and hitching along a trifle. 

"Never mind, Doctor, don't disturo yourself," replies the 
other promptly, laying a hand on his shoulder, "I'm going 
below to have a smoke, anyway." He holds up a cigar cor- 
roboratively and moves away smiling. I notice that the 
woman's eyes follow him till he disappears down the stair- 
way. 

"Oh, I have been so gay," she breaks out in effervescent 
confession; "we've all been over to Belvedere several times 
on Saturday night and staid till Monday; Kate and Monty 
and Belle and Jack, and the crowd, you know, and we did 
have alfully jolly times. Dancing in the evening and launca- 
ing parties on the bay, and big dinners at the hotel and 
everything. Oh, and Dick actually took me to the theatre 
all alone one night last week " 

She breaks off with a little laugh that seems to me to 
have a shade of nervousness in it and looks at her husband. 
He shakes his head and says: 

"It won't do; it won't do at all," then adds with clum„y 
good humor, "I shall have to have a board appointed to in- 
vestigate all these things and make a report." 

She laughs again, and this time it sounds like relier. 
It surely cannot be the joke. 

After a time they go on talking about their new living 
arrangements. It seems they have had a plan of going to 
housekeeping, but the wife has a plan of her own for going 
to boarding. Tactfully she unfolds it, and tenderly he tries 
to keep from showing his disappointment. He wants a home, 
I can see that, but she wants to board, and well, they will 
board. 

"I will have to have my office down town then," he says, 
when she has finished. "Well, there will be one advantage 
about that" — with another attempt at playfulness — "if i 
want to stay down town late at night I will have a good 
excuse." 

She turns away with affected pique. 

"Oh, you don't need any excuse; you can go whenever 
you feel like it and stay as long as you please." 



II' quickly to look Into her fact 

turns It more toward mi M) eyes are rlgoroual} Used on 

Island, hui l am verj sure thai there is a smile pi 
about th.' i mi nns of her mouth. There is prolonged silence 
Then I Bee a large gloved hand steal over a small gloved 
hand under the Up of a black feather boa, a, id after 
she slowly turns her head hack. 

what! The engine stopped already! I didn't realise we 

were so near in: WS ought to have gone forward sooner. 

I trail along after my friends, wondering if the rubber; 
smell will ever get out of this ferry-boat. Wo reach the 
front railing. 1 like to stand here and see the boat land. 
1 wonder if she will bump on the piles or go straight in. 
That young man looking up lien- from below had better be 
careful — she is heading straight for the piles. There! she 
did bump and bumped hard. It's a good thing the railing 
was handy. 

I wonder what he can be so interested in that he hardly 
notices a jolt like that. His face looks familiar; why, yes, 
I know — he's the one they called "Dick." He is probably 
looking for his friends. They are here just ahead of me. 
just stepping onto the gang-plank now, but they are not 
going to look back — yes, the woman looks back! 

Her eyes travel rapidly about the lower deck till they meet 
those of the man looking up; there they rest. It is only for 
a moment, but — well, I am glad the husband did not 
see that look. 

And yet it seems as if the time must come — 

But they are pouring ahead through the depot corridors, 
the crowd is pressing from behind; I, too, must hurry along! 



If you will watch the Sun- 
day papers for oar special 
sales each week of drugs, 
medicines, toilet articles, 
you can save considerably 
over our regular cut rates. 
Telephone orders delivered 
at once. South 356. 

S6c Owl Drug Co. 

1128 MARKET ST., S. F. 
BROADWAY*. 10TH ST., OAKLAND. 




Judge W. M. le Poer French, touring through Yaocouve,- 
Island in a No. 2 Locomobile. 
Model to be seen at The Salesroom of the Locomobile Co. o/ the Paci/ic 
1 622 to 1 628 Market St. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




A few of the bears on Pine street 
The Pine-St. Market, have shown again that while they 
affect to believe that the Comstock 
is played out and bluster about it in a way that might con- 
vince people who do not know them, they are only really 
running a bluff, with little nerve behind it. It did not take 
much to make them throw their hands down when Mexican 
and Ophir strengthened up a cent or two lately, and the 
alacrity with which they ran prices up on themselves in a 
frantic effort to fill a line of shorts shows plainly enough 
that they are not so sure that their theories are correct, 
when it comes to backing them up with coin. The public 
selling on the advance in prices relieved the situation 
temporarily, and helped the short-sellers out on this occa- 
sion, or there would have been some music down on the 
street. The riffle of excitement which even this light flurry 
caused, served to demonstrate very clearly what a little 
manipulation can do at any moment in the market, and what 
may be expected when those in control of the situation put 
their shoulders to the wheel with a determination to round 
up the short interest to a finish. A number of the wealthier 
operators of the bear persuasion held out during the recent 
attempt to cinch them, but a continued advance in prices 
would have brought them into camp, and they are not rest- 
ing very easy in their minds at the present moment. They 
have learned now by experience that there is little or no 
stock available to be obtained on loan account in case of an 
emergency, and this is not reassuring. Most of the brokers' 
wallets have been cleaned out, and the question now is, 
where has all the stock gone. It is an open secret that a 
large number of shares have been sent East for some months 
past, and this is another puzzle which the talent on the 
street has tried in vain to solve. The recent movement in 
the market has served to bring in assessments now in pro- 
cess of collection. A guarantee that the sales of delinquent 
stock will not be so heavy as they were. News from the 
lode has not been very exciting of late, but it is known 
nevertheless that the result of prospect work at several 
points along the lode is satisfactory. The drill about to be 
used on the Brunswick ground has arrived, and it will not 
be long now until work there will start up, and the question 
of values will soon be determined. The success which has 
hitherto attended operations in Chollar ground suggests the 
possibility for other developments of more ore by the new 
method about to be adopted, and this should assist in putting 
the speculative business on a healthier basis. Judging by 
present indications the new year now opened will be more 
prosperous on Pine street, than the one just closed. 

Alaska Packers has touched ?175, and 
The Local Stock the directors have increased the divi- 
Market. dend from 75 cents to $1 per share, pay- 

able on January 13th prox. This com- 
pany has scored during the year for its shareholders in 
good shape, and it would be pleasant to note the same of a 
dozen other concerns on the lists and be in a position to con- 
gratulate their managers. This, however, is about the only 
stock which has proved a bonanza for its holders during 
the year now closed. The balance of the share market has 
been unsatisfactory, to say the least, and it can only be 
hoped that the New Year opens with a promise for better 
things in store. The Gas situation is still complicated, and 
the likelihood is that before things are straightened out 
some new scheme will be hatched to lower the price of 
manufacture, opening a field for further competition. Sugar 
stocks remain steady at the figures which have ruled of late, 
with brighter prospects at the plantations for the coming 
crop year, which should help to build up stock values again 
to something like their old time level. Bonds continue ac- 
tive and in demand with prices firm for all descriptions. 



The latest report of the Peerless Oil 
The Peerless Oil Company shows the exact cash price of 
Company. oil delivered during November was 

$8,146.90. The December deliveries will 
exceed this amount considerably. The shortage of cars con- 
tinues. Since the last report was issued the following 
work was accomplished at the Peerless wells: Well No. 13 
was finished on December 19th, at 1023 feet. Its pumping 
began December 27th. It averages about the same as the 
other deep wells. Well No. 15 is drilling at 870 feet; well 
No. 16 is drilling at 700 feet; at Power Plant No. 2 has been 
installed a second 70 H. P. boiler, so that the power at this 
plant now aggregates 140 H. P., and is sufficient for the 
handling of all the present operations at the south end of 
the property. As stated in report No. 41, issued November 
25th, the directors will be able to fix the date for the payment 
of the first dividend as soon as they receive the expense bills 
for December, and a report giving the date will be issued 
some time during January prox. 

The future of the oil industry of 

The Growing Oil California can be considered an as- 

Industry. sured fact. That of the speculative 

share market is more or less of an 
uncertainty. The wild-catting engaged in the early history 
of the market has done more to shatter the confidence of 
outside investors than can be readily calculated. Time 
may heal some of the wounds, which now raise an ugly 
feeling in the minds of those who have been mulcted 
severely in their investments, when perhaps they may again 
feel inclined to take their chances. In the matter of legiti- 
mate business it is safe to predict that the coming year 
will see grander results than have been attained during the 
past twelve months, when the progress made was excellent. 
There are many who affect the belief, and they may be 
right in it, that oil production will be the banner industry 
of the State. From all indications, it certainly will not be 
the smallest, when all is said and done, despite the efforts 
that have been made to down it. 

The firm of L. E. Pike & Co. is giving 

An Oil Freak the oil editors of some Eastern and 

Crops Up Again. Los Angeles exchanges a lively 

dance. Another attempt is being 
made to market the shares of the Eastern Cons. Oil Co., and 
it has raised no end of a row. The critics denounce the 
advertising tactics of this concern, which claims to control 
20,120 acres of oii land, nearly all of which was in unproven 
territory. A statement that oil was "right on the shore, 
so much so that it bubbles into the ocean and stills the 
waters, no matter how hard the wind blows," is wildly 
derided. This reads very much like the yarn which ap- 
peared some months ago about a river of oil flowing into 
the North Atlantic, flattening the rollers for miles out to 
sea. Some of the Southern California papers treat both 
the firm and its promotion scheme to some very unkind re- 
marks. 

An assessment of $1 per share, ot 
A Big Assessment. $150,000 in all, has been levied by 
the management of the App Con- 
solidated Gold Mining Company. This is the company now 
running the Rawhide and App mines of Tuolumne County. 

Mr. A. L. Black is onw cashier 
A New Bank Cashier, of the London and San Francisco 
Bank. His promotion was an- 
nounced on Thursday last, much to the pleasure of all who 
have known the gentleman during the past twenty-seven 
years of his connection with the bank. 

* The statement of the financial condition of the Hibernia 
Savings and Loan Society, published in this issue, shows a 
most prosperous state of affairs. The growth of the business 
done by this bank is wonderful, and is a credit to the mana- 
gers. The Hibernia has always been noted for its enter- 
prise and for the shrewdness with which Its investments 
are made. By these methods it has built up one of the 
most prosperous banking institutions in the United States. 



Mrs. Kithlken Aethob Duff, pupil of La Jennewo. Royal Colloire of 
Mus'e. StutlL-iirt method endorsed and approved by Lliat. HWplmn 
Heller and others. From 2 to 4 p. m. 618 Golden dote Ave. 



Did It ever strike you that you tan buy Jesse Moore Whis- 
key tor the same price that Is paid for Just ordinary whiskey? 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from D< 
ber .lil to December 9th. 



B«*r FlftV 
CWJornU SLrxUrd 

El Dorado 

Pour Oil 

Ifanlnrd — -. m 

Homo OH . 

Junction 

Korn Oil 

Kern River 



Hetrolriitn Center 

Reed Crude Oil... 

Superior 

Thlrly Three 

Wolverine „ _ 

•o Joaquin O A D Co 

Oil CHr Petroleum 1.900 

Peerlen 60 

Occidental of Went Vlreinia .1.350 

Lion 3,450 

Sterling - 1.400 

Monarch ol Arizona -.3.200 

Monte Crlito 250 

31.223 




S1I--7 



MR. JAMES L. FRAZER RESIGNS. 



On Monday night the resignation of Mr. James L. Frazier 
from the position of Superintendent of the Western division 
of the Southern Pacific system was handed in at headquar- 
ters in this city. Mr. Frazier surrenders the office which he 
has held with so much credit to himself and the road to ac- 
cept the position of General Superintendent of the Toledo, 
St. Louis and Western Railway. Mr. Frazier has been in the 
railroad business for nearly thirty years and his rise has 
been steady. He began as an assistant civil engineer in the 
extension of the Chesapeake and Ohio road in 1873, and in 
August, 1891, was brought out to this coast by the late 
Collis P. Huntington, who appointed him to the superinten- 
dency of the Truckee division of the Southern Pacific 
Company's system. Through steady promotion he gained the 
position of superintendent of the coast division in 1894. 
In October last he was further honored by appointment to 
his present position. Mr. Frazier will be succeeded by Mr. 
Warren S. Palmer, superintendent of the Sacramento divis- 
ion. Mr. Palmer is a thorough engineer and an expert on 
construction work. He is eminently fitted to occupy the desk 
where Mr. Frazier has made so many friends for the Com- 
pany and himself. 



A venerable sage from Salt Lake, 
When quietly asked what he'd take, 
Said Roanoke Rye, it excels like the pie 
Which only my mother could make. 



It looked as though half the people in town bought 

the Christmas dainties from Swain's Bakery on Sutter street. 
This old-established place is noted for the exceedingly fine 
quality of the goods it sells, and for its restaurant, whicn 
is patronized by the most exclusive. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
trl-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter, journey across the continent. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 
Dentiat, 806 Market. Specialty, " Colton Gas" ior painless teeth extracting- 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country. Tel. Main 1042. 



Ldnoh and dinner, 50 cents, at Felix's Rotlsserle, 587 California street, be 
ow Kearny : Sunday dinner, 750. Best French restaurant in town 



Ameroian Dispensary, 514 Pine street, above Kearney. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
order from any coal dealer. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



THE... 

VULCAN... 

SMELTER 



A simple and effective smelting furnace 
for Qold, Silver, Lead and Copper 
Ores, manufactured by the VULCAN 
SMELTING & REFINING COM- 
PANY. Built in units from 6 to i,ooo 
tons daily capacity. No tuyeres, no blow- 
ers, no belting, no shafting. Simple in 
construction, economical in operation. 
Send for catalogues aud other information. 

Address 306 Pine St., San Francisco 



J. O. Harron, Pres., 

Thos. Rickabd, 1st. 

Vice-President 



} 



(Formerly In Mills Building 



There is nothing in the world more delightful than a drink 

of good whiskey*— and Jesse Moore is good whiskey. 



Formerly of f A. J. McCone, 2nd. Vice 

t, , e T ~ -> President. Of 

Parke & Lacy Co. (_ Fulton Fd'y.Vircinia City 

HARRON, RICHARD & McCONE 

21 AND 23 FREMONT STHEET. 

riining machinery s n u d pplle8 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 

Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL HILL" 

Devotes Its entire revenue to the embellishment of its grounds. Burials 
are continuing as heretofore* Plots and Graves for Sale, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perpetual care of same. Within 20 minutes of Kearny Street, 
Many street car lines pass the Kate. 

Tel west 68. Bush and Central flVe., San Francisco 

C. F. MATTHEWS, D.D.S.. Manager 

MATTHEWS DENTAL CO. 

SPECIALTY: CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 

128 Powell Street. 

Phone Red 2714 San Franoisco 

DR. G. E. SUSSDORFF 

Late Superintendent Physician City and County Hospital. 
Mental and Nervous Diseases. 

Specific treatment for Liquor and Morphine Habit. 
Patients may be treated at home if desired or in Private Sanitarium. 

Office— Glasgow Bids:., 105 Ellis street. Hours 10 to 12 a. m. 2 to 4 p. m 

near Powell. 

Pacific Towel Company no. 9 Lick Place 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels 8l per month; 12 hand or 
roller towels $150 per month. Tel- Main 1780, 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




The New York Department is examining tine United States. 
This company was in the agency of G. W. McNear, and lias 
withdrawn. The United States Company is in the habit of 
withdrawing, and in this case Manager W. O. Waynian is bet- 
ter off without the United States even as the same was true 
of the Girard. A manager that can make money for his com- 
panies as Mr. Wayman has done will not have any trouble 
in keeping up his carrying capacity. 

* * * 

The automobile hazard is bound to force itself into the no- 
tice of the Fire Underwriters. The News Letter almost a 
year ago called attention to the dangers of housing an auto 
whose power was generated by gasoline. Now the Boston 
Manufacturers Mutual says: "Some of our members now 
make use of gasoline automobiles in passing to and from 
their works. These machines, when stopped and left under 
pressure, are hazardous. We have the record of several 
fires occurring outside our risks. Members are therefore 
cautioned not to put up automobiles operated with gasoline 
within premises insured by us, unless the pressure is taken 
off and the gasoline withdrawn from the machine for outside 
storage during the period of rest." 

* * * 

The drug men of New York are to organize a Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company. The Tarrant loss is soon forgotten. 

* * * 

October embezzlements footed less than $922,000. 

* * * 

Mr. Thomas C. Hindman, whose metoric career in San 
Francisco is not forgotten, is now in Tennessee, and is with 
the Mutual Life. He is to be married early in the year. 

* * * 

The Home Insurance Company of New York has published 
a valuable article on the fire hazard of fertilizer works. The 
author is General Inspector Griswold, and the article is sent 
with the compliments of Vice-President E. G. Snow. 

* * * 

Mr. Benjamin J. Smith of the Connecticut has returned 

from his Arizona trip. 

* * * 

Captain G. E. Overton, General Adjuster of the Milwaukee 
Mechanics', spent the holidays in Los Angeles. 

* * * 

It seems sad to find that San Francisco is not represented 
among the officers of the national association of Life Under- 
writers. 

* # * 

The Western Fire Marine and Plate Glass Insurance Com- 
pany of Chicago is in trouble. 

* * * 

J. M. Beck of the Fire Association and the Philadelpnia 
Underwriters recovered promptly from his attack of grip 
when he found that the loss ratio for his two companies 
was considerably below 25 per cent. 

* * • 

The Lion has quit. Months ago the News Lett°r said it 
was hound to come, and now the Lion is permanently 
drowned in the Niagara. Mr. W. J. Landers has been made 
Pacific Coast manager of the Niagara, and it is a safe pre- 
sumption that the Niagara won't lose under the management 
of Mr. Landers any of the Lion's desirable business. 

* * * 

The Aetna Life has published some interesting accident 
statistics, by which it shows that the horse is "pre-eminently 
the dangerous, animal." The summary is as follows: In- 
jured by the horse, 81.21 per cent; by the railway, 8.35 per 
cent; by the bicycle. 7.25 per cent; by the automobile, 3.1!»; 
Deaths, by the horse, 83.70 per cent; by the railway, 9.78 
per cent; by the automobile, 3.26 per cent; by the bicycle, 
3.26 per cent. 



Appended to a report on gasoline vapor lamps just issued 
by the National Board is the following caution: The prin- 
cipal danger from these gasoline devices is in having the 
gasoline about. At ordinary temperature gasoline contin- 
ually gives off inflammable vapor, and a light some distance 
from the material will ignite it through the medium of this 
vapor. The vapor from one pint of gasoline will make 
200 cubic feet of air explosive. It depends upon the propor 
tion of air and vapor whether it becomes a burning gas or 
destructive explosive. Beware of any leaks in cans, and 
never forget how dangerous a material you are handling. 
The same report says further: No portable hand or table 
lamp is to be permitted. Note particularly that gasoline 
lamps should be hung at a safe distance from ignitable ma- 
terial, woodwork, etc., and be sure the lamps have metal 
heat deflectors. 

* * * 

The Wisconsin Odd Fellows' Mutual Life, which has for 
some time been in the hands of a receiver, has paid 20 cents 
on the dollar. The receiver sued 8,000 people for an amount 
aggregating $172,000, and realized $15,000 on the judgments. 
This is mutuality on the Odd Fellows' plan with a vengeance. 

* * * 

J. D. Maxwell's many friends on the street are glad to con- 
gratulate him on his convalescence. 



If you want the very best whiskey drink Old Crow 

Special, colored label. It has a merit not approached by any 
other whiskey, and is a universal drink. 



Half of the success of a tea is having a good chafing 

dish in which to prepare delicacies. The very best are kept 
by Lebenbaum & Co.. 222 Sutter street. They also keep 
perfumes from the best French makers, and have bon-bons 
and dinner favors. They keep Lowney's and Maillard's 
candies, and also manufacture their own, which they sell at 
35 cents per pound. All sorts of fancy candy boxes and bas- 
kets kept on hand. 



3o where you will, the best saloons sell Jesse Moore Wills- 



A NEWSPAPER NOTE 

OAKLAND'S 



The 
Tribune 



GREAT 

EVENING 

NEWSPAPER 



Is 



managed, for San 

Francisco advertising business, 

by F. R Porter, whom 

consult; tariff inviting. 

9 Powell street, Columbia 

Theatre Building, San 

Francisco. 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



— De, Shrauy, 274 Lexington avenue. New Yorh 

L. CAHEfS & SON Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 

S»nr) fnr Pamphlet. 



418 Sacramento Street. 



CRYSTAL PALACE 



CHOICE WINES AND' LIQUORS 
COMMERCIAL LUNCH A SPECIALTY 



_5 Kearnu Street 
12 Geary Street 



, DEUTCI1, l'rt.|i 



CrADrp Books, Photographs, etc. Catalogue, with samples. 11.00 
M/AKUC S8a ied lelter pos t. O. ARTHUB, 8 Bueri'tcluse, Paris. 

From Thomas'. London 

MANUFACTURER CF 

Fine Shoes 

NearWaldori-Astoila. 60 WEST 34TH ST. 

Between 8th Ave. and Brotidw ay. New York. 




January 4, 1902. SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMAMS FUND 

IN3URANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAN1, 



C. P. SICLLINS. Manager. ila-t\S California Blreet. 8. P. 
PtRB INSURANCE 



Pounded A. D. 1792 



Insurance U 



ompany 



of / lorth Amer 



ica 



07 PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital te.000.000 

Surplus to Polioy Holders „ J6.022.016 

JAMBS D. BAILEY. General Ag-ent. 412 Calllomla street. S. P. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up. 13.446.100 Assets. 124.662 013.3-'. 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $8,830,431.41. Losses Paid Over. (184,000.000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL, F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF New Zealand 
Capital. 16,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 812 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manned 
Hooksb Jr Lent, City Agents. 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 



BUTLER A HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent. 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(limited) OF LIVERPOOL 
Capital S6,700,O0O 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents 



316 Oalliornls street, S. P 



The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

ol ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital. 12.250,000 Assets 110,984,248 

TOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 

Pacing Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 8ohleaalng«r, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St, 8. F. 



17 



Inexcellcil for hlwrnlitv anil trrurily 



Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 



Home Office: 

Pacific .Mutual Kuililing 

San Francisco 



of California 



kV£" 

PAY YOU ft 
/0SSES ! 



THE AMERICAN CREDIT- 
INDEMNITY GO. OF NEW YORK 

S. M. PHELAN, President. 
CREDIT INSURANCE ONLY 

The Leadlne Mercanti'e Houses of the United States 
~~^^~~ endorse this system. 

Correspondence Solicited. A business producer and profit protector. 
GEORGE J. STERNSDORFF. 211 SANSOME STREET 

Paoiflc Coast Agent Tel. Black 4434 SAN FRANCISCO 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(incorporated by the State ol New York.) 
As< els over 862,000,000. Liabilities $53,0i<0,000. Surplus over 88,000,000 

Issues policies for all approved forms of insurance; adupted to all stations 
and circumstances of life. Policies i>re frrc fr>iin remrjction<* as 'o travel 
and residence; are clear, concise business contracts, and conditions are 
plain and pimple and easily understood. 

Home office — New York City. Pacific Coast head office. 4,9 California 
Street, San Francisco. 

Jonn B. Heereman, President; Haley Fiske, Vice-Presid' nt; Geo. B, 
Woodward, Secretary; Georere H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; JaineB 
S- Roberts, Assistant Secretary* 

THE IMPERIAL INSURANCE CO., LTD., 

OF LONDON. 
Instituted in 1803. Established on the PaoiHu Coast In 1355 
Cash Assets. $9,130,695. 

THE LION FIRE INSURANCE GO, LTD., 

OF LONDON. 
Established 1879. Cash assets in the IT. S„ (926,105.75 

Wm. J. Landers, Resident Manager Pacific Coast.,.. 

205 Sansome Street. San Francisco. 



Pacific coast Oepartmen! 




INSURANCE COMPANY 

OW FE.HB1PORT 



C. H.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sar. Franciscoi Cal 
Phone, Main 5509. 



New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal, 

Edmund F. Gbken, Manacer. Jessie W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Fire Association, of Philadelohia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 

J. M. BECK, Manacer 
219 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Fire. Lightninur, and Tornado Insurance- 

Home Insurance Go. of MeW York. 

Capital, 93,000,000 Gross Assets, 813,637,833 

Surplus to Policy-holders,&7,631,926 
H. L, Roff, General Aeent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co.. City A tents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-oreranized, competent, and experienced force of 
General and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensur- 
ing prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the 
insuring public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and 
Payment of Losses. _____ 

THE MANHATTAN LIFE of new york 

Want the best men obtainable for several pieces of excellent 
territory— and will make miarhty interesting: propositions to 
good men. Address 

JOHN LANDERS, Pacific Coast General Agent. 
240 Montgomery Street San Francisco 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



BUBBLES FROM THE SWIM. 



By Lady Algy. 

The Spreckels' dance to see the New Year in was rather 
disappointing from a pictorial viewpoint. It had been 
rumored for some time that the Spreckels were to give an 
elaborate ball, and many of the girls had ordered stunning 
gowns for this affair. But when the invitations came in 
"hello" calls over the 'phones it meant an informal dance, 
so "creations" were tucked away and dainty dancing frocks 
donned. The prettiest gown on the floor was worn by Geor- 
gie Hopkins. It was a white gauze splashed with panne 
velvet discs that looked as though Mistress Georgie had 
stood under a shower of snow flakes for a moment. An ap- 
plique of ecru lace was in effective contrast to the snowy 
whiteness of the skirt, and the bodice was relieved with 
gold and pink. Miss Hopkins was among the guests that 
Edith MeBean dined prior to the dance, and she is also to 
be the motif of a dinner dance given by the McNears on 
the 9th. There will be a midnight german with handsome 
favors, and it will really be the first big private affair of the 
season. The Charity Ball on the 8th promises a swell crush. 
* * • 

Mary Mannering's coy admission that she only receives 
notes from girls and is not attractive to men must be well 
shaken before taken. However, "Mary, Mary, quite con- 
trary," is really a girl-charmer, and has several severe 
crushes to her credit with society maidens. The Joliffe sis- 
ters are perhaps most devoted, but there is good cause for 
their attentions. Mary Mannering lent a sisterly hand to 
Fiances Joliffe on her stumbling attempt to gain a footing 
on the stage, and it was not Miss Mannering's fault that 
Frances did not succeed. In fact. Frances Joliffe now half 
acknowledges what the rest of her family have always con- 
tended, that she will never make an actress. It is the old 
story of the society moth and the stage candle. Frances 
b gan with Modjeska, and has always played with first-class 
companies, but has never lifted a part out of mediocrity. 
As a sister-in-law to the Spreckels millions, she has been 
able to escape the jolts that upset most struggling actresses 
but success has not elbowed her way. Her sisters declare 
that Frances has more than her share of the family gray 
matter, but they have never succeeded in combing the kinks 
out of it. Mary Man'iering is genuinely fond of Frances, 
and they were insepaiables on Miss Mannering's last visit 
to the Coast. Now, Mrs. Spreckels and the other Joliffes are 
making this trip pleasant. 

Instances of friendship between stage folk and our smart 
set are not rare. May Hoffman and Julia Marlowe were in- 
troduced on one of Miss Marlowe's engagements at the 
Baldwin, and it was a case of friendship at first bow — a 
friendship that has stood the shocks of May Hoffman's 
torrid escapades. It was Julia Marlowe to whom May first 
wrote her reasons for burning her bridges and eloping with 
the hypnotic curate. Miss Marlowe has declared that she 
still loves May Hoffman and will be her friend until the cur- 
tain rings down on the last act in their lives. Which proves 
that not all stage friendships are paste. 
* * * 

Apropos of these affairs I must not forget the Jersey Lilys 
penchant for Sara Collier. It was many years ago when 
Lily Langtry and her shoulders were on exhibition at the 
Baldwin with Mr. Freddie Gebhard picturing the perspective. 
Mrs. Langtry and Mr. Gebhardt went down for an over-Sun- 
day jaunt at Del Monte. Society was taking its annual dose 
of Monterey summering at the time, and the Jersey Lily's 
presence was wildly exhilarating in a season as barren of 
scandal as the cotillion leader's head was of hair. The men 
went over in a body to the Langtry charms, but the women 
were shy. Some one discovered that little Sara Collier was 
a miniature presentment of the Jersey Lily, and indeed it 
did not need a magnifying glass to see the resemblance. 
Little Miss Collier braved up to the English beauty and 
blushingly said: " 'Scuse me, but all the ladies say you look 
just like me, and I hope you won't cry over it, 'cause really 
you're not freckled at all, and I think they just say it to ■ 



What 

you get with 
PEARLINE: 

1. Very little 
rubbing-soak, 
don't tug. 

2. Less hard- 
work.— rinse, 
don't rub. 

3. Less wear 
arvd tear,— 

preserve, don't destroy. 

4. Better health,— stand up, 
i don't bend double; live, don't 
, merely exist. 5. Saving of 

time,— precious, don't waste it. 

6. Absolute safety,— be sure 
I you're right, then go ahead. 651 

All Pearline Gains 




Marion 
in her 
"First Aid 
Young 
keeper," 
there can 
tie doubt 
saving 



Harland 
book, 
to the 
House- 
s a y s 
be lit- 
of the 
effort 



by use of most 
washing-powders, 
and, if a trust- 
worthy powder 
be used, of the 
saving to the fab- 
ric, over the old 
soap-rubbing way 
of washing. 
Users and imita- 
tors, both, have 
proved Pearline 
trustworthy. 



make you feel bad, and I think you're the most beautiful 
lady I ever saw." 

Tableau: Jersey Lily throws her arms around child and 
goo-goos rapturously. 

Last year Mrs. Langtry met one of our gilded youths who 
was doing London, and she asked him about Sara, the 
scene evidently having dented her memory. The Jersey 
Lily seemed rather disappointed to hear that Miss Collier 
had lost all resemblance to Mrs. Langtry, and is now likened 
to Trilby — Du Maurier's heroine of the flawless feet. 

* • • 
Tongues have been two-stepping over the escapade of three 
girls who "did" Chinatown one night last week with a trio 
of men more familiar on the turf than in the smart set. 
The gay little party was unchaperoned by a chaperon, and 
things went with a zip. But one of the girls was foolish 
enough to leave her purse with a card in it on the table 
at the restaurant where the sextette went to sup after the 
fatigue of Chinatown. She remembered it when she stepped 
into the carriage, and sent her escort back for it. The merry 
revelers, who had in the meantime taken the table, found 
the purse and saw her cards. They are not exactly in the 
girl's set, but somehow the story has trickled through the 
strata that divide them and reached her friends' ears. The 
other two girls have magnanimously up and 'fessed that 
they were also along, which rather takes the tang off the 
scandal and brings it to the level of a schoolgirls' lark. ■ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. California. Loca- 
tion of works— storey County, Neveda. 

Notice is hereby given that at u meeting of the Board of Director-, held 
on the l"th day of December. 1901, an assessment (No. 57) of live (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately In Unired tales gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 21at DAY OF JANU VRY 1902. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and unless pay- 
ment Is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 12th day of Febru- 
ary. 1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

CHAS. K. ELI lOrr, Seer. tary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Blook. 309 Montgomery street, San Fra-icisoo. 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Alpha Consoldiated Mill and Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works, -torey County. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 27th day of December, 1901, an assessment {No. 26) of three (3) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stook of the corporation, i ayable Im- 
mediately In United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, aan Francisco, 
Cal. 

Any stook upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 30TII DAY OF JANUARY'. 1902. 
wUl be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction: and unless 
payment Is made befure. will be sold on THURSDAY, the 90th day of Feb- 
ruary. 1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with tho costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of Diieotors. 

CHAS, E. ELLIO IT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
Cal. 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



STATtMENT OF THE CONDITION tND >ALIE OF THE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan 

oOClCty, a Corporati 



:ion 



And where said Assets are situated, dated December 31, 1901. 



ASSETS. 

1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is $23,083,546.28 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are all existing Con- 
tracts, owned by said Corporation, and are 
payable to it at its Office, which is situated 
at the Corner of Market, McAllister and Jones 
streets, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, and the payment 
thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real 
Estate within this State, and the States of 
Oregon and Washington. Said Promissory 
Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at 
its said Office, which is its principal place of 
business, and said notes and debts are there 

situated. 

2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 263,500.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its Office, which is situ- 
ated as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is 
secured by "Northern Railway Company of 
California 5 per cent Bonds," "Southern Paci- 
fic Railroad Co. of California 6 per cent Bonds," 
"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent bonds," "Market-St. 
Railway Company First Consolidated Mort- 
gage 5 per cent Gold Bonds," "Park and Cliff 
House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds," 
"Spring Valley Water Works First Mortgage 
6 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley Water 
Works, Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," 
and "Pacific Gas Improvement Co. First Mort- 
gage 4 per cent Bonds," the market value of 
all said Bonds being $313,070.00. Said Notes 
are kept and held by said Corporation at its 
said Office, and said Notes and Bonds are 
there situated. 

3— Bonds of the United States, the actual value 

of which is ,'. 21,512,405.54 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own Vaults and are there 
situated. 

They are "Registered 4 per cent of 1907 
($18,500,000.00) and 4 per cent of 1925 
($1,000,000.00) and 3 per cent of 1908 ($500,- 
000.00) United States Bonds" and are payable 
only to the order of said Corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of 

Which is ■ 5,313,320.83 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own Vaults and are there 
situated. They are "Market Street Cable Rail- 
way Co. 6 per cent Bonds ($1,006,000.00,") 
Market Street Railway Company First Con- 
solidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds' ($339,- 
000.00,") "Sutter Street Railway Company 5 
per cent Bonds ($150,000.00,") "Powell Street 
Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds 
($50,000.00,") "The Omnibus Cable Company 6 
per cent Bonds ($82,000.00,") " Presidio and 
Ferries Railroad Company 6 per cent Bonds 



($30,000.00,") "Northern Railway Company of 
California 6 per cent Bonds ($555,000.00,") 
"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds ($388,000.00,") 
"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of Cali- 
fornia 6 per cent Bonds ($786,000.00,") "West 
Shore Railroad Company of New York 4 per 
cent Bonds ($77,000.00,") "Spring Valley 
Water Works First Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 
($78,000.00,") "Spring Valley Water Works 
Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($462,- 
000.00,") "Spring Valley Water Works Third 
Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($860,000.00,") 
and "City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent Bonds 
($22,500.30.") 

5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to 
January 1, 1902 96,314.86 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($640,200.04) and in 
the Counties of Santa Clara ($248,676.00), Ala- 
meda ($176,462.30) and San Mateo ($29,234.96), 
in this State, the actual value of which is.. 1,094,573.30 

(b) The land and building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 

value of which is 570,335.82 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it 
belongs to said Corporation, and part of it is 
productive. 

7 — Proportion of taxes for the Fiscal Year 1901- 
1902 chargeable to next half year 38,860.08 

8— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, 
belonging to said Corporation, and in its pos- 
session, and situated at its said Office, Actual 
Value 1,921,642.43 

Total Assets $53,894,499.14 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $50,763,010.86 

The condition of said Deposits is that they 
are payable only out of said Assets and are 
fully secured thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,131,488.28 

Total Liabilities $53,894,499.14 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, By JAMES R. 
KELLY, President. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, by ROBERT J. 
TOBIN, Secretary. 

City and County of San Francisco. gs 
State of California, 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each 
separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That 
said JAMES R. KELLY is President, and that said ROBERT 
J. TOBIN is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and 
that the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of Janu- 
ary, 1902. 

GEORGE T. KNOX, Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 




WEARYIN' FOR YOU. 
[Frank I.. Stanton, in Pittsburg Bulletin.) 
Jes' a-wearyin' for you — 
All the time a-feelin' blue; 
Wishin' for you — wonderin' when 
You'll be comin' home agen; 
Restless — don't know what to do — 
Jes' a-wearyin' for you! 

Room's so lonesome with your chair 
Empty by the fireplace there; 
Jes' can't stand the sight of it! 
Go out doors an' roam a bit; 
But the woods is lonesome, too — 
Jes' a-wearyin' for you! 

Comes the wind with soft caress, 
LiKe the rustlin' of your dress; 
Blossoms fallin' to the ground 
Softly, like your footstep sound; 
Violets like your eyes so blue — 
Jes' a-wearyin' for you! 
Mornin' comes the birds awake; 
Used to sing so for your sake! 
But there's sadness in the notes 
That come trillin' from their throats; 
Seem to feel your absence, too — 
Jes' a-wearyin' lor you! 
Evenin' comes; I miss you more 
When the dark glooms in the door; 
Seems jes' like you orter be 
There to open it for me! 
Latch goes tinklin' thrills me through- 
Sets me wearyin' for you! 

Jes' a wearyin' for you! 
All the time a-feelin' blue; 
Wishin' for you — wonderin' when 
You'll be comin' home agen; 
Restless — don't know what to do — 
Jes' a-wearyin' for you! 



ASHES OF ROSES. 



(Helen Hay, in Harper's Monthly.) 

All my dead roses! Now I lay them here, 
Shrined in a beryl cup. The mysteries 
Of their sweet hauntings and their witcheries 

Are not more subtle than this jewel clear — 

And not more cold and dead. The winter's spear 
Has fallen on their petals, once so wise 
With beauty; yet their joyous secret lies 

Still in their perfumed heart, supremely dear. 

Roses of Love! Time killed you one by one, 
And mocked my pains as sad I gathered up 

All the fair petals banished from the sun. 

Yet have I conquered! See the dead loves bless 
Life from my heart, which is their beryl cup, 

Warming the winter of my loneliness. 



THE MASTER MUSICIAN. 
(Aldis Dunbar, in The Book World.) 
Thy melodies are traced as wreaths of foam 
That fling their filmy treasures up the sand, 
In symphonies by gray old Ocean planned 
'Neath Heaven's twilight-clouded, shadowy dome. 
When o'er the keys they subtle fingers roam. 
Within our hearts we hear, at thy command, 
The surging rollers — on the curving strand — 
Break, in wild longing for thy restless home. 
Thy harmonies are heard through wind and storm: 
Their chords roll onward grandly as the waves 
That rise and fall, with neither rest nor sleep. 
Though light as wind-tossed spray they fancies form, 
Faintly their echoes die in sea-swept caves, 
Where far beneath resounds the mighty deep. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

ESTATE OF GILES S. BROWN, also known as G. S. BROWN, De- 
ceased- 
Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned, OEORGIE BROWN. Execu- 
trix of the last will and testament of D ceaj>ed, to the creditors of, and all 
persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necess.ry vouchers, within four month* after the iirst publication of this 
notice, to the said GEORGIE BROWN. Executrix, at the office of J. F. 
RILEY. Attorney-at-Law. Rooms f>5 to 58, 416 California street. Han Fran- 
cisco, California, the same being her place for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

GEORGIE BROWN. 
Executrix of the last will and testament of GILES S. BROWN, also 

known as G. S. BROWN. Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco. December 23, 1901. 

J. F. RILEY. 
Attorney for Executrix. 416 California street. Rooms 56-58. 

DISSOLUTION OF COPARTNERSHIP. 

The copartnership heretofore existing between R. C. Rosenberg. G. A 
Rosenberg, and L. R. Rosenberg, and Mary Rosenberg, doing business in 
the City and County of Han Francisco, State of Californ a, and also in the 
City of Boston, State of Massachusetts, under the lirnt name and style of 
"JACOB ROSENBERG'S SONS." Wool Commission Merchants, is this day 
dissolved by the mutual consent of the respective parlies thereto. 

R. C- Rosenberg will continue in the Baid business under the same name 
of "JACOB ROSENBERG'S 80NS." at No 221 Front Street. San Fran- 
cisco, and will liquidate all the partne ship debts contracted in the State of 
California. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have hereunto executed 
these presents in duplicated Ihls thirtieth day of July A. D, 1901. 

R. C ROSENBERG. 
G. A. R09ENBEBG- 
MARY ROSENBERG. 
L. R- ROSENBERG- 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31, 1901, dividends hnve been de- 
clared on deposits in the Havings Department of this Company, as follows; 
On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of 3 per cent, per annum, free of taxes, and payable on 
and after Thursday. January 2. 1902. Dividends uncalled for are added to 
the principal and bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and 
after January 1. 1902. J. DALZELL BROWN. Manager. 

Office — Corner California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisoo, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with Deeeinber31, 1901, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three (31 per cent, per annum on nil deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Thursday. January 2. 1902. 

GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 

Ofllce-526 California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

dividend" NoficiF 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 3'st of December, 1901, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and forty-two one-bundredths 
(3 42-10") per cent, on lenn deposits and three (3) per cent, on ordinary de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday. January 2, 1%2. 

LOVELI. WHITE. Cashier. 

Office— 532 California Street, eorne- Webb. San Francisco. Cal. 




ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 



SALES STABLE 



423 Poet street, between Powell and Mason. 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 



W. E. Bridge, proprietor 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Blake. Moffit & Towne Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co. Port'and Or 



Telephone Main 199. 

DEALERS IN PAPER 

56-57-59-61 First street 8. F 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA 
BITTERS, the great 

Mexican remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 

Depot at 323 Market St., San Francisco. Sena for circular 



San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET, 8. F. 

Deposits July 1, 1901... >28,978.M0 Reserve Fund 1226,99 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 445,617 

E. B. PO ND, P resident W. O. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Maeeo, w. C. B. de Fremery. O. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jaoob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

LoanB upon San Franotsco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In oheoks payable 
In San Franolsco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entranoe fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for reoelpt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



BANKING 
London and San Francisco Bank, nmued 



434 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 71 I<ombard utrrrl. Ixtmlon. 

Capital Authoriwd. 12.500.000. Capital Paid Up. $1,400,000. 

Director*— Henry Oowhcn. Chairman. London; <*hr1*tlan de Gulgne, 
San Francisco: Charles Hoifrr, Ix>ndon: John I.. Howard, San Fran- 
cisco; Hentllx Koppal, I»ndon : Grevtile Horsley Palmer, London; Norman 
D. Rtdeoul. San Francisco: Arthur Scrivener. **>ndon. 
Inspector ol Rrsnches. Guslar Friedcrlr v 
ArenU In New York, Messrt. J, P. v - afcd A Co. 
BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon: I.^jih, Wash., Seattle, Wash. 
I-etU -» of credit I -sued available for travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise In any city of the world. Deal In foreign and domestic excha nee 
Accounts of country banks received. Terms on application. 

W. Mackintosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With whloh is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE— Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000- Reserve Fund. $2,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000. 

Hon- Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager, 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E- C, S. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exohange Place. Alex- Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 

ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal: Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon Distriot 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlin. Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kam loops. Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rossland 
Sandon, Vancouver, Victoria- In the United States — New York, N. Y. San 
Franclsoo. Cal- Seattle. Wash- Portland. Ore- Skagway. Alaska- 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York — The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franoisoo Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sanbohb and Sutter Sts. 

Subsorlbed Capital t2.500.000 Pald-tTp Capital. 82.000.000 

Reserve Fund. H.000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 10 Threadneedle street, London. E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Aeenoy oi the London. Paris and American Bank. 
Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle. 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. OREENEBAUM, Manager. 

R. ALTSOHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts.. San Francisco 
Jao. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgixl. Cashier F. "W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL 1500,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $130,000. 

DIRECTORS- James K. Wilson. Win. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pleroe, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel Sc Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank, St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London-* 
Brown. Shirley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 11,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

.Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and bavings. Investhents carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg. President; W« A. Frederick, vice-President; H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg, W. A- Frederick, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A, Denlcke, A- G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred 0. Siebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pink and -Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphlo transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STELNHART. P. N. IJXIENTHAL. Managers. 



Wells Fargo & Company Bank 



Paid Up $1,600,000 

Reserve Fund... 700.000 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St Mills Building. 



Interest paid on deposits. 



WilliamAlvord 
William Babcoek 
Adam Grant 



Loans hade. 
DntEOTORS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 

W. S. Jones 



Praaldanl 

Manager 
(ashler . 

imn, Casiubh . 

2nd. Asst. (ashler. 



JOHH .1. Vai I 

ll'-MI'll H. KlNll. . 

II. Wamworth 

K. L. l.n-M r., 
II. L. Mn.i.t'K 



H.H.Hewlett 
E. J. McCutohen 
R. H. Pease 



(Nkw YOBKi 

BRANCHES malt Uu, . 
( Portland, Or, 



Han PWralMO 

. . Hmi Fr-nclsoo 

Min Fianclaoo 

- Van Francisco 

Man Francisco 

II. B. PABXnn, Cashier 

j. e. Dooly. < ashler 

R. La a Harsw, Cashier 

Statement of Condition at Close of Business, July 31, 1901. 
ASSETS 

Loans $IO,«M2.400/>I 

Bonds. Stocks and Warrants 2 191 727 lo 

Roal Estate 1,665.08)1.77 

Miscellaneous Assets \-> 4 1 5.6,*; 

Due from Banks and Bankers 1.10i,30s!l2 

^a*" 3.973,676!o4 



$19,689,558.17 

LIABILITIES 

Capital 8 500,000.00 

Surplus 5.7*0,000.00 

Undivided Profits 3.311,290 28 

Deposits, Banksand Bankers 1,124.165.27 

" Individual 8,904.102.62 



$19,589,568.17 
General banking business in all its branches. Correspondents throughout 
the World. Accounts received on favorable terms. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, $2,000,000. 

Surplus. $1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits. October 1, 1901. $2,851,860.11. 

WLLLIAM ALVORD President I THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-Pres'l I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary I SAM H.DANIELS AsB't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Measre. Laldlaw & Co. ; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis — Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev. — Agency of The Bank of California. London — Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris — Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin — 
Direction der Dlsconto OesellBohaft. China. Japan, and Eatt Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,290,159.05 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000 00 

Deposits June 29. 1901 .29.886.288.1 1 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President, 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann. Ign. SMnhart, H. B. Russ, Emil Rohte, N. Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Sec- 
retary. George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A H. Muller: General Attor 
ner. W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital..... $800,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

C4HOEGB A, Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS — James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neat, James M. 
McDonald, Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALLFORNIA 
Subsorlbed Oapltal..$12,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... $260,090 
Pald-tn-Capltal 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Cobbtb, General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FBANOISOO 
Corner Market. Montgomeby and Post 8t». 

Paid-up-Capital 11,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker. President Geo. W. Kijnb, Cashier 

O. B. Green, Vice-President W. Gbego, Je.. Assistant Cashle 

Directors— W. H. Crocker . B. B Pond. Georee Orooker, C. E. Green. G . W 
Kline H.nrr J. Crocker. G. W. Scott 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



THE BELLE OF YESTERYEAR. 

It is greatly the habit of the human mind to take a retro- 
spective glance, as it were, towards the vanishing ol4 year 
as it passes from our vision and note the different data with 
which its months are marked. A gay society belle has sug- 
gested "harking back," as she calls it, to the prominent belles 
of yesteryear in San Francisco's swim, seeing what has be- 
come of them, and in how many cases they retain their 
places as social favorites after having become our most 
charming young matrons. Take, for instance, the handsome 
Sperry sisters, whose advent from Stockton created such 
an impression in our fashionable set that they became lead- 
ing belles at once. Ethel, who is now the charming wife 
of Mr. Will Crocker, holds sway in her own set, while Beth 
as the Princess Poniatowski queens it among the Blingum- 
ites right royally. Of the coterie of girls at that period Miss 
Edith Taylor was a pronounced belle, and since her marriage 
to Mr. George Pope, is quite as popular as a young matron. 
Miss Mabel Pacheco, now Mrs. Will Tevis, was a leading 
belle with Tessie Fair, who is now Mrs. Herman Oelrichs. 
Mrs. Will Tevis, however, unlike the handsome Tessie, does 
not devote herself to society, but remains most of the year 
at their country place near Bakersfleld. Miss Ella Goad was 
a shining light in belledom. and when she married Mr. Os- 
good Hooker society hoped they had but gained a matron in 
their ranks, but Mrs. Hooker and her beautiful sister, Aileeu, 
now Mrs. Charley Mcintosh, seem to find more pleasure "far 
from the madding crowd" in their domestic life. The Stet- 
son sisters, Nelly and Sally, now respectively Mrs. Oxnard 
and Mrs. Chauncey Winslow, are, on the contrary, devoted 
to a society life, and are popular hostesses. One of the 
most acknowledged belles who reigned by right of beauty 
was Miss Nelly Joliffe, who as Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, re- 
tains much of the charm of her girlhood. Miss Emily Hager 
was a leading belle and a very popular one as well, but since 
her marriage to Mr. Walter Dean, Jr., she is not often seen 
in social circles. Mamie Burling as Mrs. Dr. Page seems to 
love society more than ever; so too may be said do the Hop- 
kins girls, who have so recently been added to the ranks of 
society's young matrons. They each take part in social gath- 
ings with the greatest zest. However, to return to the belles 
of long ago: Miss Minnie Mizner, now Mrs. Howard Blan- 
chard Chase, Miss Belle Wallace, who married Mr. Mervyn 
Donahue, and later Mr. Dick Sprague, and the Ashe sisters, 
Linie and Milly, were standing belles for several seasons. 
The two latter were always welcome in all "sets," and while 
Milly, who married Mr. Harold Sewall, is lost to us, having 
gone East to live, Linie, now Mrs. Norman McLaren, remains 
here, and is as great a favorite as ever. The three pretty 
Corbet girls were very popular in society about this time. 
One married Captain Best of the army, and has left us for 
pastures new; another married the fashionable physician. 
Dr. Beverly McMonagle, and is a bright star in San Mateo's 
firmament. 

Several of our erstwhile belles, like Mrs. Sewall, have 
chosen an Eastern home — notably Eva Carolan, who married 
a Mr. Tetlow of New York, and the pretty Ames girls, Alice 
and Gertrude, sisters of our present belle, Miss Bessie, who 
both married Boston men and reside there. 

Many decades ago, there were no greater favorites in 
society than the Blanding sisters. Edith married Mr. Carle- 
ton Coleman, and is now his widow, while Lena has never 
married. Of that period were the distingue Brooks girls, 
one of whom married Mr. Jack Reis and another an Eastern 
man. Miss Daisy Paige, now Mrs. Louis Monteagle, and 
Miss Julia Crocker, who is Mrs. Sam Buckbee, are illustra- 
tions of how a young matron can retain the charm and 
popularity of her girlhood. Miss Clemmie Kip, a popular 
belle of several seasons, chose a soldier husband, having 
married Dr. Edie of the army. Another brilliant belle who 
decided to enter the ranks of the army was Miss Ethel 
Cohen, now Mrs. C. L. Bent. She is and always has been 
a bright star in the galaxy of society belles. A great beauty 
as well as belle was Miss Hannah Williams, who as Mrs 
Walter Hobart does not seem to find as much delight in 
society as in her cozy home at Blingum. Her two sisters- 
in-law, the Misses Ella and Alice Hobart, married Mr. W. E. 
Lester and Mr. Charley Baldwin respectively. They surely 



had what is dear to every girl's heart (a good time) during 
their sway in society. But now Mrs. Lester lives very quietly 
in town, while Mrs. Baldwin is an invalid. Miss Mae Dimond 
and her sister Elinor were belles of about the same epoch. 
The first named married Mr. Jo Tobin and is to-day as 
striking a feature of society's ranks as in her girlhood. Miss 
Elinor Dimond married Mr. Paul Jarhoe, but does not shine 
in the swim with the brilliancy of Mrs. Tobin, apparently 
enjoying life at Santa Cruz more than in San Francisco. 
These are the most prominent of the belles of yesteryear 
who have become matrons. Of those who have elected to 
remain single may be mentioned Miss Carrie Gwin, Miss 
Flora Low, and last, though by no means least, Miss Laura 
McKinstry, whose brilliant intellectual powers and thor- 
ough knowledge of Irs convenances fit her for being a feature 
in any society of the world's centers. 



Eminent Physicians 
are eagerly studying the problem of baby feeding. Borden'a 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is recommended by the lead- 
ing family physicians. It is always safe and reliable. Send 
10c. for "Baby's Diary." 71 Hudson street, N. Y. 








DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular met- tine: of the Board of Directors t t this society, held tin-* 
day. a dividend has been declared at the rate i f three and one-eighth (3%) 
per cent per annum on all depo-its for the six months ending December 
31. 1901 ; fne from till taxes, and payable on and after Jan* ary 2, 1902. 

ROBBKT J. lOBIN Secretary. 

Office — Cor Market, McAllister and Jones stre. t. San Francisco, Cal, 

December 30. 1901. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1901 dividends on term deposits 
at the rate of three and i-ix-lentbs (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, and on or- 
dinary deposits at the rate of three IS) per cent, per annum, free of laxeB, 
will be payable on and after January 2, 1902, 

8. L. ABBOT. .IR . Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery street, Mills Building. San Francisco. Cal. 

IN THE" SUPERIOR COURT OF THE City and County of San Fran- 
ci-co. St*te of Calif -rnia. 

JAMES M. F. DAVIH. Plaintiff, vs. NETTIE DAVIS, Defendant. 

Action brought In the Superior Court, City and County of San Kranctaco, 
State of California, and the complaint riled in said City and County of San 
Franci«co, in the office o! the Clerk of said Superior Court. 

The People of the State of California send greeting to Nettle Davis, de- 
fendant. 

You are hereby directed to app ar and answer the complaint in an action 
entitled as above, brought agaiust you In the Superior Court City and 
County of San Francisco. State of California, within ten days after the 
service on you of this summons, if serve i within this County; or within 
thirty days If served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified 'hat unless you so appear and answer, the 
said plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
i laint. 

Given under my hand ami the seal of said Superior Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco. Stata of California, this seventeenth day of Aug- 
ust, 1901. WM- A. D U ANE, Clerk. 

(Seal.) By E. M. THOMPSON. Deputy Clerk. 

NOTICE. 

The nature of the cause of action set forth in and the relief dem nded by 
the above mentioned complaint are as follows: 

The action is brought to seou'-e a divorce from defendant on the ground 
of the willful desortion by the defendant of plaintiff: and the relief sought 
is the dissolution of the bonds of matrimony now holding together plaintiff 
and defendant 

PETER T RILEY and J. F. RILEY, Attorneys for plaintiff. 416 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



SUNBEAMS. 

rn from Tlilerr". 

"Do you think," said the old man. as 

he halted at the corner grocery and 

toyed with a basket of clothespins, "that 

any person In this town has my happt- 

tt heart?" 

"No. sir." promptly replied the gro- 
cer. 

"Do you think that a cockeyed man 
who never saw me till yesterday can 
be unselfishly Interested tn my future?" 

"Not by a jugfull." 

"In offering to Introduce me to a 
willow and try and bring about a mar- 
riage he would probably be guided by 
sordid motives, you think?" 

"Certainly I do." 

"Having secured my $25, he wouldn't 
care whether my future years were full 
of bliss or wretchedness, would he?" 
Not by a durned signt." 

"Grocer, I thank you!" feelingly 
exclaimed the old man, as he turned 
from the clothespins to cranberries, 
and let a handful dribble through his 
fingers. "While I am a stranger to you, 
you seem to have my welfare at heart." 

"Yes, I have. I'd like to sell you a 
box of wagon grease for a quarter." 

"But what use could I make of it?" 

"Use it to soak your head in." 

Two farmers on a visit to Liv- 
erpool stood upon the platform of Lime 
street railway station the other day, 
when a lady passed in the height ot 
fashion. "There, Jim," says one, "what 
do you think of that, lad?" Jim eyed 
her for a minute, and then said: "Ay, 
Tom, it's bad ground that takes so 
much top-dressing." 

Mrs. De Firm — I tremble to think of 
our daughter marrying that young man. 
Why, he orders his mother and sister 
around as if they were slaves. Mr. De 
Firm — Don't worry, my dear. He won't 
order our daughter around more than 
once. She takes after you. 

"Does your wife take any interest in 
gardening?" "Yes, indeed. She goes 
out every fine day with the hoe and 
chops the head off something I've plant- 
ed." 

Friend — Does your town boast of a 
football team? Suburbanite^No; wo 
used to boast of one, but we iave to 
apologize for it now. 




vtHrs R, *s 



SAUCE 



BEWARC Or IMITATIONS. 



THE ORIGINAL AND GENUINE WORCESTERSHIRE. 

All dishes, such as soups, fish, meats, 
gravy, game, salads etc. are doubly 
appetising and digestible when fla- 
vored with-rLea & Perrins' sauce. ■ 

Signature 
On Every Bottle. 



oOUx. tPx^a* 



j John Duncan's Sot\5 
&rt *i,*l& Agenta-NewYOrK.. 



CHARACTER BY UMBRELLA. 

The man who sat nearest the window 
said he didn't mind the wet weather. 
"It gives me a chance to see how 
people carry their umbrellas." he 
said. "I have such firm faith in my 
umbrella deductions that I wouldn't 
be afraid to choose a wife with them 
for a guide." The woman on his left 
smiled. 

"I'm glad I'm not out there in the 
street," she said. "You'd be picking 
out all the kinks in my disposition 
ajpng with the rest of them." 

"'"Oh," said the man, "I sized you up 
long ago. You carry an umbrella, when 
it's furled, just like that woman across 
the street. You grab it in the middle 
and go forging ahead with the ends of 
the handle digging into the unfortunate 
pedestrians who go before, and follow 
after." 

"And what does that signify?" asked 
the woman on the left. 

"Alertness, activity, selfishness and 
inconsiderateness." 

"Um-um," said the woman. 

"But just look at the t'lird woman in 
the procession," said the man. "I pity 
the men folks about her house. I'll 
warrant they have to get their own 
breakfast about six mornings out of 
the seven. I never saw a woman who 
dragged her umbrella along so that 
you could track her by the trail of the 
tip who wasn't dilatory and shiftless. 
She never sews on a button, or darns 
or mends, and her breakfast dishes are 
seldom washed before two o'clock. 

"That other woman who is bustling 
along holding to the top of the umbrella, 
handle like grim death and pointing the 
top down and forward In a kind ot 
south-by-southwesterly direction is al- 
together different. She would set the 
world on fire if it wasn't water-logged. 
I am not sure that I'd want to marry 
her, either. She'd be too energetic. 
She'd push everything before her, and 
when she took a notion to clean things 
up a mere man would have nowhere 
to lay his head. What she is good for 
is serving on committees. 

"The woman in the gray skirt is a 
yea-and-nay sort of person. She wants 
to agree with everybody and follows 
wherever led. Women who carry their 
umbrellas backward and downward are 
always unassertive. 

"But just look at that girl who spins 
along, swinging her umbrella around in 
a circle as if it were a magic wand. 1 
like her. She's jolly and good-natured 
and gets more pleasure out of life 
than ten ordinary people. There's a 
woman carrying her umbrella swung 
across her shoulder- like a shotgun. 
She's a true soldier of fortune and was 
never known to say die. I can't think 
of anything that would feaze her." 

The man paused. 



"And what would you say," asked the 
woman, "about that girl who carries 
her umbrella horizontally across the 
small of her back and catches either 
end into the crook of her elbow?" 

"Well," admitted the man, "she is a 
new one on me. I never met her be- 
fore, but I wouldn't be afraid to wager 
that she is conscientious to a degree 
and has a heart as big as all out-doors." 

"But here," he added, "comes the 
most even-tempered woman of the lot. 
She cuddles her umbrella protectingly 
under her arm as if she doesn't want 
even it to get hurt in the crowd. That 
woman is gentle and thoughtful and 
kind." — Kansas City Journal. 



This entire building and two annexes are required 
to accommodate the i,&x> students attending the 

„ NewEnglani* _ 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

Accessible to musical events of every nature. The 
best masters in music, elocution and languages 
that money can command. 

Geo. W. Chadwick, 

Musical Director. 

Prospectus 

sent 

free. 

Address 




The Wonderful 
Strides of the 

vose 

PIANO 

in the artistic world have demoral- 
ized its competitors. 

Buyers should not conclude the 
purchase of a piano until they have 
examined these phenomenal in- 
struments. 

Sold for cash or on the small 
monthly payment plan and for 
rent. 

We sell other makes of pianos 
at prices and on terms that 
defy competition. 

BENJAMIN CIRTAZ & SON, 

1 6 to 20 OTarrell St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



A Pioneer Musician. 



Some Reminiscences of Stephen toasset. 



In the News Letter of. December 7th I find reference to 
Stpphen Masset — "Jeemes Pipes of Pipesville" — as having 
given the first concert in California (in 1850), during 
v»hich he sang, recited, played the piano and told funny 
stories. 

Massett could "make himself at home" with more sang 
froid tnan any man I have ever known — that is, if you said 
to him, as Gray, who once owned a music store on Clay 
street, said to him when he was last a guest at his house: 
"make yourself perfectly at home, old man," there would 
be no cigars, candy, wine, liquor or perfume left upon his 
departure. And yet he was a sunshiny old bachelor guest, as 
he was punctillious in his manners, dress and deportment, 
and was seldom short of coin. 

Through the kindness of the Lelands he was made com- 
fortable during the evening of his life; but when he died, 
at the Windsor Hotel in New York, about four years ago, 
the event was not even made a iwo-line telegram of by the 
Associated Press reporter. Two reasons: "Jeemes" died 
poor, and the present is an age of mediocrity of Associated 
Press reporters, whose Thespian information is confined to 
shooting-star vaudeville females with small voices and Dig 
legs, and to funny monologists that laugh at their own vul- 
garity and stare vacantly at the vacant benches down stairs. 

Massett must have been eighty at the time of his death, 
as he looked an old man in the eany '50's, although his 
locks were ambrosial as well as gray. He had one of the 
sweetest voices ever known; he was a pianist of some note, 
wrote his own music and verse, and was a humorist of the 
' old school. He first came to California in 1850, then again 
in 1867, visited Southern California, and again in 1874, put- 
ting in a year in Southern California, and much of the time 
in Los Angeles, during which he was a daily visitor at the 
Star Office, and one day (April 11, 1874) he published in my 
paper the following song, dedicated to Miss Emelina Melius, 
of Wilmington: 

I have gazed on the face of the lovely and gay, 
And watched the love sparkle from eyes passing bright. 

But the brightness that glows in the morn's early ray 
Is the glance of thine eye — is the life of its light. 

When I saw thee I thought how my heart would be blest 
By one word from those lips — than the roses more red — 

And the smile that thou gav'st lulled my spirit to rest, 
But with it, alas! all my happiness fled! 

Though I leave thee, I cannot forget thee; O, never! 

Thy eye is my guide star on life's stormy wave; 
And, believe me, my heart will be with thee, forever, 

And beat for thee only till it rests in the grave. 

Now, whether or hot the handsome old poet felt all that 
he had written, no one can ever know. The radiant object 
of his verse was surely mistress of the voice, eyes, hair, 
lashes and other personal charms that prostrate others 
than a wandering minstrel like "Jeems Pipes of Pipesville" 
in the ecstatic agony of love. The deceased played in the 
old Park Theatre of New York sixty years ago, and was at 
that time known as the Beau Brummel of riroadway. 

Apropos of first concerts and early circus and other shows 
in San Francisco, the first dramatic performance given on 
the Pacific Coast was at Monterey a year or two before Mar- 
shall's discovery of gold. 

The play was Hamlet — the inimitable Lieutenant Derby 
essaying the character of the melancholy Dane, and the wife 
of Sergeant Holcomb, who kicked the beam at 240, playing 
the part of Ophelia. Reynolds was King, Stoneman Laertes, 
and Magruder the Ghost. Now, the tragedy would not have 
been an indifferent affair had the jocund apparition been 
strictly sober. But, unfortunately, he had just previously 
dined with Senors Bandini and Arguello, and had partaken 
not wisely of native wine and Aguardiente; his utterances 



also were a trifle more spirituous than sepulchral, and he 
nearly upset Ophelia by entering at an improper time and pre- 
senting Laertes' afflicted sister with a prodigious bouquet in- 
artistically constructed of kelp and malva. Captain Bur- 
ton, as Polonius, and Major Armistead, as the prompter, 
then entered and yanked the unsteady ghost off the stage. 

"Romeo and Juliet" was subsequently given but Derby 
transformed the balcony scene into a roaring farce by 
coming upon the stage on the hurricane deck of an under- 
grown donkey wrong end foremost. Magruder was "Frlah 
Laurence upon this occasion, and nearly killed "Mercutio" 
(Stoneman) in the second act by tripping him up at R. U. E. 

Fourteen of the "actors" and auditors upon these two 
occasions became officers, and distinguished themselves 
during the Rebellion, and all have made their final exits. 

These notes were given me by Colonel Cave J. Couts, 
thirty-two years ago, while I was a guest at his house, near 
San Luis Rey. There was a noble, hospitable gentleman. 
1 shall never forget him, nor Mrs. Couts, one of the noblest, 
stateliest, and handsomest Spanish women of that day. 

BEN. C. TRUMAN. 



In some cities carpet beating has been declared a pub- 
lic nuisance, as it should be everywhere: Carpets should be 
sent to an establishment like Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works. 353 Tehama street, where all the dirt is quickly 
removed without injury to the fabric. They call for and 
deliver goods. 



Fay & Foster, of the Grand Hotel Cafe, have solved 

the problem of a mercantile lunch, and their place is 
crowded daily from 11 to 2 by business and club men, who 
have discovered the excellence of the meals served. 



R°Sv?<<E 






THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS 
A FULL QUART Of FfNE OLD VIRGINIA RYE. THOROUGHLY 
AGED IN WOOD.BY THE ADDITION OF HONEY AND 
MOREHOUND ITS MELLOWNESS .TONE AND MEDICINAL 
PROPERTIES HAVE BEEN MATERIALLY ENHANCED AS ATONIC. 
STIMULAITANDGENERALINVIGORATOR.IT IS UNSURPASSED. U 



■SOLDINGLASSONLY- 



•ONE FULL QUART- l& 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Schilllntrer's Patent) in all its branches. Sidewalk 
and earden walk a syeclalty. 



Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, 



ban Franci&co 



R.t-i icU^c For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath -houses, billiard 
l) i I J S 11 K S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners 
l_"^i , -* , -' , ■ x - / --' dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, priuters, painters, shoe factories, stable men. tar- 
roofers, tanners, taUers. etc. 

BUCHANAN BRUS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St., S. F. Tel., 661 



January 4, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



25 



Uf>e DOUBLE SHIFT. 



Arlington Hotel 



HOW HEARST AND DE YOUNG TRADED BUILDINGS. 



Aj Related to Me by Young Munchausen. 

Young Munchausen liKik.il weary of the world when he 
Into the once yesterday morning. "I'm i meatal, 
physical and financial wreck," he announced. "The 

"t original, but ii expresses my (eellti 
again will I indulge in a New Year's eve celebration 

experience for me. I fooled around town until 

I thought of my Oakland home. Whin ii <li,l 

occur to me there wasn't a car runniug to the ferry. I just 

had to catch that last boat. Then were tars coming up 

so 1 grabbed one of them, turned it aroun.l. 

■•I it onto the other track, ami made the gripman 

take me to the ferry. But he was so confused by the Esiimi- 

ner and Chronicle buildings lieing switched around to each 

other's corners that he hardly knew which way he was going. 

anyway. It had " 

Young Munchausen had been talking so fast that I had 
had no chance to put a word in. But as he paused to take 
breath I Interrupted him: "What on earth do you mean bj 
the Examiner and Chronicle buildings being switched 
around?" 

He looked at me pityingly. "I sometimes wonder," he said, 
"how you hold your job. Y'ou probably wouldn't without my 
help. I'll bet that if Market street sunk forty feet and the 
Oakland ferry-boats came up to the City Hall you wouldn't 
know it until I told you. This thing about moving the 
buildings started before election. Mike de Young and Willie 
Hearst nut during the campaign and got talking over the 
election. Mike, of course, was hot for Tobin and knew 
he would win, while Willie was just as sure Schmitz would 
be the next Mayor. 

" Til betcher the drinks,' said Mike, 'that Tobin wins out 
dead easy.' 

" Really,' said Willie. I wouldn't put up so small a wager 
as that.' 

"Then \> illie joshed him pretty hard, and at last Mike 
got mad and said: 'Betcher my building against yours.' 

"Willie jumped at that, and the people who heard it 
laughed. But Willie generally knows what he's doing, as 
happened in this case. Mike nearly had a fit when Schmitz 
was elected, and tried to pass it off as a joke; but there were 
too many witnesses, so Willie held him to it, and yesterday 
morning, after the papers were out, the buildings were 
moved. It stopped vegetable wagon traffic for nearly half 
an hour. There wouldn't have been near so much trouble, 
rnly the circulation editors got quarreling and delayed pro- 
ceedings for awhile." 

"I suppose they simply put rollers under the buildings, 
hitched ropes to them and yanked them along," I suggested 
sarcastically. 

"No, they didn't, any such thing. Neither did they build 
fires iu the cellar, fill them full of gas and float them over." 

"Well, how did they do it?" 

"That's for you to find out," said Munchausen, angered at 
my sarcasm. "They're moved, all right, and Hearst is hav- 
ing the Chronicle building painted yellow. If you don't be- 
lieve it, look out and see." 

I went to the window. "There," I said, "I knew — Hey, 
there!. Say!" But Munchausen nad reached the foot of the 
stairs and wouldn't turn back. I. hope he comes back and 
explain how those buildings got moved back to their origi- 
nal positions. W. J. W. 



A new suit is very nice, but next to that is an old 

suit cleaned and renovated at Spaulding's Cleaning and Dye- 
ing Works, 127 Stockton street. They thoroughly remove all 
spots and stains, and also clean gloves, neckties, laces, cur- 
tains, tapestries, etc. Goods called for and delivered and 
work done promptly. 



Japanese goods and curios are coming more into favor 

every day for decorations and ornaments. George T. Marsh 
& Co., 214 Post street, have a fine selection. 



SANTA BARBARA 
The finest summer climate In the State. Sea bathing 
every day In the year. The best green turf golf links 
In California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. DUNN, Proprietor. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Sauare Park) 
Finest cafe In this city. 



THE very center of the city, convenient <• 
all the bis stores and all places of amusemei t 
European plan. Si a dar and upwards 



Milton Roblce. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St, 

Ne w York Gity 

A Hieh Class Kxclus-ive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate ratis- 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Qujnn, Proprietor. 

Mortimer M. Kelly, Manager 




RIGGS HOUSE 

Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 

of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. O. G 
Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

PARArs6"H0rSPRINGS 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 

C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



Monterey County, Cal. 
F. W. Schroeder, Manager, 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Win. B. Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention, 

San Francisco 



PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Two hours 
from San FranclBco. Five miles from Los GatoB. No 
tiresome staging:. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating*, swimming and fishing 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. 8. OLNEY, Manager. 

BALDWIN ANNEX 

CAFE AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

926-928-930 Market Street and 56 Ellis Street. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every delicatessen 

Domestic nnd Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St., above Kearny 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 4, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due fco arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

leave] From December 6, 1901 [aebive 

7:00 a Benlcla, Sulsun, Elmtra, and Sacramento 6:55 p 

7:00 A Vacaville, Winters. Rumsey 7:55 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoea, Santa Rosa... 6:25 P 

8:00 a Davis. Woodland, Knights Landlne. Marysville, Orovllle 7:55 P 

8:00 a Atlantic Express. Oirdenand East 8:25 A 

8.-00 A Niles. Lathrop, Stockton 7:25 P 

8:00a Niles, Mendota. Hanford. Visalfa. Porterville- 4:55 P 

8 :80 A Shasta Express — Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Sprines), Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 p 

8:30 a San Jose. Livermore. Stockton, lone, Sacramento, PlaoervtHe, 

Marysville, Ctalco, Red Bluff. 4:25 p 

8:30a Oakdale, Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne- -. 4:25P 

9 00 A HaywardB, Niles, and way stations 11:55 A 

9:00 a ValleJo 12:25 p 

9:00 A Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced, Fresno, and Los Aneeles 7:55 a 

9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 A The Overland Limited— Oeden, Denver, Omaha. Chicago 5:25 p 

fl:OOP Sacramento River Steamers tH.*00P 

3:00 p Benlcia, Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing, 

Marysville. Oroville 10:55 A 

3:30 p Hay wards, Niles, and way stations ■. 7:55 p 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Valle]o, Napa. Calistoga. Santa Rosa 9:55 p 

4:00 p Niles. Livermore. Stockton, Lodi 12:25 p 

4:30p Hay wards, Niles, San Jose, Livermore t8:55 A 

450p The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

5:00 p Port Costa, Tracy. Lathrop. Stookton 10:25 A 

5:00 p Martinez. Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno 12:25 p 

6:00 P Hay wards, Niles, and San Jose 7:55 A 

t6:00p Vailejo 11:25 A 

•:00 P Oriental Mail— Ogden, Denver, Omaha, St, Louis. Chicago... 4:25 p 
7:00 P Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding. Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p San Pablo. Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 11:25 A 

18:05 p Vallejo 7:55 p 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Footof Market St.) 

8:15 A Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 P 

T2:15 P Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, New Almaden. Felton, Boul- 

aer Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15 P Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos T8:50 A 

"950p Hunters' Train — San Jose and way stations... J7:20 P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15. 9:00. and 11:00 
A. M. 1 :00. 3:00. 5^15. p, M. 

From Oak i anp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. t8:00. t8:05, 10;00 a, m. 12:00, 
2:00,4:00 p.m. 

Coa8T Division (Rroad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations 6:40 A 

7:00 a San Jo«e a-id way stations T8;00 p 

/7:00 a New Almaden /4:l0 P 

8:00a Coast Line Limited— San Joe. QHroy. Siillnns. San Luis 
Obispo. Santa Barh i- 11. Los Angeles and Principal intermedi- 
ate htalions 10:15 p 

9:00*. San Jose, Tres Pinos Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Salinas. Man 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations ....... 4:10 p 

10:80 A San Jose and way sta-lons 8:36 a 

11*30 a San Jose and wav stations 9:46 a 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park. Palo Alto. Santa Clara.San 
Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove f!0:45 a 

3:30 p San Jose and way stations 1 :30 p 

t4:15 p San Jose and princlnnl way stations 5:30 r 

4:50 P Sunset I united — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, for Los An- 
irelc. El Pit so, New Orleans and New York. Arrives Sun- 
days. Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:15 A 

t5:00 p San Jose, Ixw Gatos. and principal way wtatloriH T9:0O a 

6:30 p San Jose and p inclpal way stations 6:30 p 

6:30 p San Jose and wp.y stations 7:30 p 

7:00 p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo. Santa Barbara, Los 

Angeles. Doming, El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:30 a 

all:45 P San Jose and way stations „. 7:30p 

A for Morning. r for Afte rnoon . t Sundays excepted- 

t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company w m oa ll for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wbarf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p.m., fo r 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Blogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Saturday, December 28, 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, Jannary 21. 1902 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday. February 15. 1902 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 13, 1902 

Round Trip Tiokets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
Corner First. D. D. STOBBS, Genera] Manager. 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Lessees S. F. and N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TiBtraoN Ferry — Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS-7:30, 9:00. 11:00 a.m.: 12;35. 3:30, 5:10. 6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. waturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 p.m. 
8TJNDAYS-8:Oo 9:30.11:00 a.m.: 1:30. 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 p.m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAY8-6:10, 7:50. 9:20. 11:10 a.m.: 12:45. 3:40. 5:10 p.m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40. 3:40 5:05.6:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San 


franeisco 

Sundays 
s:00 am 
9:30 AM 
5:00 Pm 


In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 


Arriveat San Francisco 


Week days 1 
7:30 am 
3:30 pm 

5:10 PM 1 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa Rosa 


Sundays 
10:40 am 
6$5 Pm 
7:35 pm 


1 Week days 
1 8:41) am 

10:25 AM 
1 6:22 pm 


7:30 am 1 
3:30 pm 1 


8:00 AM 


Fulton. Windsor. 

Healdsburr. Lytton, 

GeyBervllle. Cloverdale 


7 ;35 Pm 


| 10.-25 AM 

1 6:22 Pm 


7:30 AM I 


8:00 AM 


Hopland. TJkiah 


7136 PM 


6:22 pm 


7:30 am I 

3:30 pm 1 


S.IK) AM 


Guernevllle 


7:35 Pm 


10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 


7:3ii AM 1 
5:10 Pm 1 


8:00 AM 
5:00 Pm 


Sonoma 
Olen Ellen 


9:15 am 
6:06 PM 


8:40 am 
6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 1 
3:30 PM | 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


Sebaetopo] 


10:40 AM 

7:35 pm 


I i0:j»am 
1 6:22 pm 




SS Australia." for Tahiti. Jan, 4, '02. 10 a. m. 
SS "Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat.. Jan 4, 2p,m: 
SS "Ventura. "for Australia, Thurs. Jan. 16, 10 a.m. 
Line to Uooltrardie. Australia, and Capetown. 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS&BROS.CO.. 
Agents. 6J3 Market Street Freight Office. 327 
Market St., San Francisco, 




Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teamer8leav6Broadw «y Wu «f 

San FranclBco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 a. m, : Jan. 1. f>, 11, lis. 21. Z6, 
31; Feb. 5. Change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C and Puget Sound Ports. 11 a. m. Jan. 
1. 6. IX, 16, 21,26, Sli Feb. 5. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:30 p. m. January 2, 
7. 12. 17,22.27; Feb. 1. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara. Port 

Los Angeles and Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa." Sun- 
days, 9 a. m. ; Steamer "State of California." Wednesdays; 9 a. m. 

For Lob Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz. Monterey. Han Simeon, CayucoB. 
Port Harford (rtan Luis Obispo) "Uaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura. 
Hueneme. East Sun Pedro. San Pedro, and 'Newport. ('BoD.it only, i 

Bonita, sa. m., Jan- 2. 10, Is. 2'.: Feb. 3. Coos Bay. 9 n. m . Jan. '1, 11,22 
30; Feb. 7. 

For Mexican Ports, 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further Information obtain Company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing days and 
hours of sailing, without previous nclicd. 

TICKET 0FFICE-No. 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Agts. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

Going East, take the 

UNION PACIFIC 



"The OVERLAND ROUTE." carrying Un- 
united States OVERLAND MAIL. 

Three through trains EVERY DAY In the Year 



'Tilt l.Mlil \SD LI'HTID' 



NO CHANCE to.... 

DtNVtR, KtSStS CITY 
OMAHA, CrllCAOO 

Less than 3 days to Chicago, 4 days to New York 

Dally Tourist c ervice. Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions from q au 
Framisco Wednesdays to Omaha. St. Paul and Chicago— WITHOUT 
CHANGE. Throuch to Boston every Friday. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, Gen. Agl. II. P. R. R.. 
1 Montgomery Street, San F«tv;i«o. 

Chicago |N LE ss than 3 Days 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO AT 10 A. M. 

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Rootn Sleeping Cars, Buflet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185«. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00. 




Vol. LXIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 11, 1902. 



Number 2. 



The San Francisco Niws Lettbb Is printed and published ©very Snturdaj 
B) me proprietor. FREDERICK MARRIOTT, 5H Kearny St.. San Francisco 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

The office o( the S. F. NEWS LETTER in London Eng., Is at 80 Cornblll 
K. c. London, England, (George Street £ Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 



Chicago Representative- 

Chios aro. 



Arthur C. Quick. Room 500. Maso io Temple 



New York Representative— C. Ironmonger. 116 Nassau Street. New York 
Boston Representative— W. H. Daggett. 36 Broomfleld Street. Boston. 
All social items, announcements, advertising or other matier, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 5 p.m. Thursday previous to day of Issue 



If Mr. Tom L. Johnson wants to be our next President he 
had better stop entertaining Mr. William Jennings Bryan. 



The Examiner has an editorial contending that a woman's 
best age is past thirty. Bet Ella Wheeler Wilcox wrote it. 



James J. Corbett says that he wants to go into the ring 
once more. He might be matched with John L. Sullivan 
again. 



His wife's bruised face and cut nose are strong evidence 
that Mr. William Collier isn't so funny off the stage as he is 
on. 



The insanity of Princess Louise, daughter of the gay and 
vicious King of Belgium, will be a good argument for heredi- 
tists to use. 



The local Russians are celebrating a second Christmas this 
week. The Russian digestion must be invulnerable and the 
Russian -purse long. 



It is remarked that the temperance people who held their 
meeting here this week didn't have much to say about Bishop 
Potter or Dr. Rainsford. 



The quarelsome little republics included in the Pan-Ameri- 
can Congress are sizzling and spluttering enough among 
themselves to keep the pan good and hot. 



Captain Hobson is going to resign from the navy and enter 
politics. He might try kissing among the voters of Colo- 
rado, where his success would be insured. 



France is charging the Americans of "crimping" her sea- 
men and Venezuela is accusing France of aiding the revolu- 
tionists. Honors, then, remain about even. 



Now that the Federal Court has doled out fines and im- 
prisonment to Noyes, Frost and Wood, it is time to tackle 
the next bach of contempt cases from prolific Nome. 



That was a simple, unconventional, free-and-easy, social- 
istic way resorted to by K. Kanaka, a Japanese who, when 
shown a tray of watches, picked out the one he liked and 
went away with it. He was very much surprised when ar- 
rested. 



Senator William E. Chandler says that the President of 
the United States is worked too hard, and that he ought to 
have an underling to make all appointments for him. This 
may be a little scheme on the part of the Senator to defeat 
President Roosevelt's long cherished merit system. 



Mr. Max O'Rell has undergone a successful operation for 
appendicitis. Readers of the papers he contributes to would 
undoubtedly help out an operation on his brain. 



Let us hope that the Salvation Army couple who indulgea 
in a "hallelujah" wedding the other night may not be called 
upon to participate in a "God-be-praised" divorce. 

The abolition of fire whistles by the fire department may 
or may not he a good plan, but it is worth mention that 
there will be one terrifying toot the less on next New Year's 
eve. 



There was a grain of truth in the description of young 
Paul S. Bolger who disappeared from a New York town. 
Tne offer of reward states that "he is of a retiring disposi- 
tion." 



The attempt of an American corporation to supply Paris 
with gas has fully confirmed the general European belief 
that the Americans are world's champions as passers of 
balloon juice. 



The fact that the Supreme Court decided seven hundred 
and one cases last year, or an average of nearly two a day, 
rather shatters the idea that the gentlemen on the Supreme 
Bench do not earn their salaries. 



In the Shakespearean revival at the Columbia is Mr. Louis 
James supporting Madam Modjeska or is Madam Modjeska 
supporting Mr. James? Both are equally in need of a crutch 
for their ripening years. 



The report from Salina, "Utah, to the effect that mosqui- 
toes as large as wasps had invaded the town in the dead of 
winter is evidence that the correspondent there has not 
yet finished his holiday celebration. 



Mr. Thomas L. Wilson, who looks after the interests of 
machinists' and other trades unions, has returned from the 
North, where, he says, he has been "strengthening the 
unions." The North's gain is our loss. 



A student of Halle was recently shot and killed in a duel 
with an officer of the German army. If Emperor William 
means what he says about stopping the barbarous practice 
at any cost, here is a chance for him to make an example. 



The employees of the Mint are complaining that strange 
noises under the floors are disturbing their peace of mind. 
Perhaps it is a ghost they hear. Perhaps not. Strange 
itoises under the floor of a mint or a smelter are more apt 
to be caused by a crook than a spook. 



The French diplomats who are interfering in the South 
African war may be inspired by a very modern desire for 
peace, but if they intend to go on the field as Boer sympa- 
thizers they are doing some artistic work toward making 
more trouble for all parties concerned. 



Desperadoes are so terrorizing the streets of Denver that 
a vigilance committee has been formed to enforce the peace. 
All this in a State where the W. C. T. TJ. controls the polls, 
women vote, Populist Governors expound Bryanism, and 
mobs burn negroes. Colorado is too near the Kansas line 
to be really safe. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 



SCHMITZ IN OFFICE. 

Mayor Schmitz has commenced his office-holding just 
about as might have been expected. He knew so little ot 
the requirements of his position, as fully set forth in the 
Charter, that he stepped into the City Hall and demanded his 
position two days before he was entitled to it. He hung 
around like a fish out of water, so evident was it that he was 
out of his element. Several of the Supervisors tried to en- 
gage him in conversation as to his future plans, but he had 
manifestly nothing to divulge. Then the reporters got after 
him to learn the names of his appointees to the various 
Boards and Commissions, whereat he grew visibly nervous. 
He had a list of the names in his pocket, and after much 
fumbling he managed to get it out, and hand it to the news- 
paper men. It appeared first in the evening, and then in the 
morning papers. But, strange to say, it was not the true 
list after all, or at any rate it was not the final one. It is, 
however, the only one that has emanated from Mayor 
Schmitz personally. When the time had arrived at which 
he should have officially presented it to the Board of Super- 
visors, he was absent at Vallejo addressing a labor con- 
vention. An acting Mayor was, however, installed for the 
occasion, who proved to be the Mayor's attorney, Abe Ruef, 
about whom the city is destined to hear a great deal during 
the next two years. Mr. Ruef read the list of appointees, 
when lo and behold! they turned out to be a very different 
set from those which Mayor Schmitz had authorized the press 
to publish. But it appears that Mr. Ruef, who is to be the 
power behind the throne, put his foot down on the Schmitz 
list, and of course that was the end of it. He then under- 
took "to save the face" of Mr. Schmitz by making known the 
names of the appointees to the Board himself. Mr. Schmitz 
hied himself to that Vallejo convention in order to avoid 
the flurry his action was bound to create. Of the Mayor's 
new commissioners, five are from the Union Labor party, 
two are Republicans, and one Democrat. Schmitz' band 
of fiddlers has been well taken care of. Four of its members 
have been provided for, and as their musical duties will only 
occupy them at night, they can draw two salaries. Mr. 
Reuf's law clerk is to be the Mayor's Secretary in name, but 
Ruef's law clerk is to be the Mayor's Secretary in name, but 
during the next two years on the city's pay roll. San Fran- 
cisco's burning desire to be esteemed a musical city ought 
now to be satisfied. 



vail. San Francisco's Government has been greatly 
strengthened and safeguarded. The efforts of James D. Phe- 
Ian to further those ends will not be forgotten, and the 
time will come when there will be further need for his 
services. Meanwhile, he will continue the public spirited 
citizen he has always been. 



THE RETIRING MAYOR. 

James D. Phelan steps down from the Mayoral chair after 
having nlled three terms of arduous duty, with benefit to the 
city and credit to himself, and to the satisfaction of the 
thinking portion of the community. It is doubtful if he 
had to do it over again that he could do it so well. It takes 
not a little of the fire and zeal out of a public man to find 
the politicians and their newspapers hounding him by day 
and by night, and from the very love of hounding, and too 
often succeeding in defeating policies manifestly for the pub- 
lic good. To Mr. Phelan's energy and persistency the adop- 
tion of the new charter was largely due, and furthermore, 
by his faithfulness, his integrity and his capacity for pub- 
lic business, that instrument was put into operation in 
letter and spirit, and is now the well-established bulwark 
of good municipal government and of home rule. It was 
a great thing to get the charter adopted; it was a greater to 
make all its part work smoothly and evolve the purposes 
of its framers. The merit system has been adopted for 
good and all, although its friends will have to be Vigilant 
in seeing that no ruthless or traitorous hands are laid upon 
it to do it violence. Never again shall we have "tough old 
Boards" of Education, "rough old Boards" of Supervisors, 
or "perpetual Police Commissioners" above the law and 
higher than the people. Never again will the city 
change its whole administration in a day. The majority of 
the Commissioners will always be hold-overs. Hence, it mat- 
ters little to-day whether the appointees of Mayor Schmitz 
are good or bad. They are totally inexperienced in public 
business, but then each one of them is confronted with two 
experienced colleagues to out-vote him. The voters of the 
city may occasionally run wild, and elect men to office 
who are unfit, but before the whole Government can be 
changed, time is given for the sober second thought to pre- 



A CRANK'S FULMINATIONS. 

A man named Wilshire is creating considerable amuse- 
ment among people who have paid any attention to his do- 
ings. The News Letter is willing to give him a few lines 
just to show how foolish some people can be when not 
properly restrained. 

Wilshire owns a publication called "Wilshire's Magazine." 
He uses it for advertising his socialistic rantings and lec- 
tures, and for that reason the postal authorities refused to 
let it go through the mails as second-class matter. Wilshire 
became angry and abused the authorities. He also wrote 
•c long, rambling letter to President Roosevelt, to which no 
attention was paid. He continued to fume, but the Postal 
Department was firm. So Mr. Wilshire has taken his maga- 
zine to Toronto, Canada, where he issues it with "Suppressed 
by the United States" in big letters across the front cover. 
It may be that the Canadian Government, if it ever happens 
to notice that he is around, will also "suppress" him. Then 
he will have to go to Anarchy Isle. 

Wilshire lived in Los Angeles once. He was a bill-poster 
with socialistic leanings. Somebody left him a big lot of 
money, so he ran for office. He had his candidacy an- 
nounced by posting all over Los Angeles bills ten feet high. 
Had he made them a little larger he might have won out. 
But he was, to quote a colored gentleman, seriously "dis- 
elected." He then turned his attention to magazine publish- 
ing and lecturing, and has managed to add a little to the 
general gaiety of things. Nobody takes him seriously — the 
fact that he is so earnest about it adds to the fun. Such 
solemn clowns as Wilshire show the wisdom of the Creator 
in not endowing all his children with brains. 



WANTED— A PLIMSOL. 

Who was Plimsol? He was a crank, but he turned some- 
thing. Among other things he turned over a seat in Parlia- 
ment and sat in it for many years. This achievement was 
noticeable, because the occupant, Mr. Plimsol, made the 
issue on which he was elected and fought his battle well- 
nigh single-handed. This one issue touched the very core 
of British pride and progress — its maritime interests. Alone 
and unheralded this man stood up and proved before the 
assembled Commons that upwards of fifty per cent of the 
British seagoing fleet, conspicuously its sailing vessels, 
were unseaworthy, under manned, and over-insured. In the 
face of seemingly overwhelming opposition he proved the 
perfect truthfulness of his assertions. He procured the radi- 
cal altering of all the loans affecting sea-going commerce in 
these particulars. He; effected the establishment of a 
Board of Trade Commission, with absolute jurisdiction to 
detain any vessel of every character which did not comply 
with the regulations adopted by the national legislation 
which Plimsol secured. In regard to deckloads, for instance, 
covering the lumber schooners, all of them were marked 
in a plain painted border, "Plimsol Mark," below which 
the vessel must not be permitted to sink under the weight 
of her cargo. Plimsol died after ten years incessant but 
successful work, universally mourned — his epitaph "The 
Sailor's Friend." It would appear that the Pacific Coast 
is badly in need of a Plimsol, whose specific business it 
should be to become the steamboat passenger's friend. Rio 
Janeiro, San Rafael, Walla Walla, all wrecked within twelve 
months, the loss of life in each wreck, each wreck utterly 
inexcusable. 

"How long have you been with this boat?" said a passen- 
ger to the chief engineer of a passenger boat coming up 
the lower coast route a few months ago. "Why," replied the 
engineer, "I took her 'round the Horn myself In the later 
fifties, and," added the white-mustached officer, "is she not 
a beauty?" And the old engineer was sincere. To him the old- 
fashioned boat, consuming double the amount of coal and 
making half the number of miles she should, was still a 
"beauty." Like the man who fell In love with Jenny Llnd's 



yiry 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



neTer was another charmer. Now, that ia what 
our maritime community. These old-time It 

were beauties In the nays of "forty-nine," nn.l 

Hies they remain until we wake up in the morning (.. 

I of catastrophes that shoul.l brand the authors or who- 

Is responsible with the invisible but ever-present stain 

!>eth. The use of modern steal 

Into water and fire-proof compartments, would 

:ited everyone of these latest horrors. On the 

es of the high North. Ice-locked for nearly live 

ths In the year, they sail magnificent steel steamers. 

ins twenty miles an hour between Duluth and Buffalo. 

alning the very latest scientific Improvements of all 

riptions. Here we are on an open, ice-free ocean coast, 

the world's commerce crowding our harbors, boasting 

speed of thirteen nautical miles per hour, and sailing 

ty-nine" wooden steamers, sent to the bottom by encoun- 

ig a rock or a lumber-loaded bark. 

Us latest wreck, that of the Walla Walla, was one of the 
t disastrous that has occurred on our coast for a long 
i. The Walla Walla was run into at four o'clock on the 
ling of January 2d by the French bark Max. Some of the 
engers and crew were gotten into boats and onto rafts. 
ire went down with the boat. In drifting around the 
n several of the people on the rafts and boats perished 
re a rescue was accomplished. In all, up to the present 
Ing, nearly thirty people are reported missing. From all 
can be learned at present the second and third officers 
be Walla Walla were to blame for the aisaster. They 
i on the bridge and the lookout reported the approach 
he Max. No attention was paid to his report. The 
tner kept on her course, with the result that the Max 
Ck her amidships, tearing her open. If the officers actej 
as been reported there is no censure adequate to fit their 
. Neither should the owners of the boat be spared for 
ying passengers in a vessel so old-fashioned as the 
la Walla. Even she was more safe than many of our 
ting steamers, having a few water-tight compartments, 
was far from modern. Unless there is a change we may 
for many San Rafael, Rio de Janeiro and Walla Walla 
ors. 



LORD ROSEBERRY IS WILLING. 

nerican papers have made light of Lord Roseberry's 
t speech at Chesterfield, England, but only because they 
not understand the conditions of public opinion which 
as framed to meet. The truth is that England is tired 
Bing without an alternative political party in opposition. 

Liberals of to-day are not a party capable of taking 
B and carrying on the business of the country. They 
split up into at least three factions, each hating the other 
le than any of them do the Conservatives. England's 
i of government is not complete without an opposition 
' equipped to take office at a moment's notice. As 
iamin Disraeli once said: "Her Majesty's Opposition 
s much one of the Great Powers of State as are Her 
ssty's ministers." It has been galling to the pride of 
British people that they must perforce put up with enor- 
sly high taxation and get nothing in return for it but 
>ver ending war. In the natural order of things they 
Id turn to the Opposition for relief. But things have 
gone on in their natural order, and therein consists 
difficulty. The Opposition placed itself beyond the pos- 
Ity of being called to power when it took the side of 
ger's ultimatum and declaration of war. An English 
y, called to fill an emergency, may hold many strange 
ions; but one thing it must be: it must be loyal to the 
ish Empire. Neither the King nor people seek their 
sors from among traitors. Right here In America we 
the same way. Thus it came that there was no alterna- 

mlnistry In sight. Joseph Chamberlain, astute politi- 

that he is, had caught the Radicals bathing and had 
away with their clothes. To make matters worse, the 
1 section of the Liberal party began a course of offen- 

agitation that forever forbids the accession to power 
,ny party that depends upon that section for support. 
1 Roseberry had steered clear of these complications. He 

the one man in Great Britain "available" for the Pre- 
fship, but not seeing where the right kind of supporters 



i.i rnmo from, he for the time being . .titles. 

i ■ himself expressed it. "plowi 
Men of nil parties and of mi parties, straggled with 
him to abandon that intention, and lie proi , his 

r at the Chesterfield meeting. Thai Is why thi 

>okcd forward to with so much I 

■ urso of affairs, he announced that "his lervJcM were 
nt the disposal of his country." That is all the i 
wanted to know. Lord Salisbury is anxious to retire, an. I 
.-. compromise ministry is not far off. with Mr. Chamberlain 
probably as the leader of the House of Common 



HOW MUCH? 



Several recent verdicts in Eastern courts in cases where 
damages were asked of corporations by parents for the loss 
of a child have again brought up the interesting question 
as to how much in actual money value the life of a child is 
worth, whether money can in any way compensate for the 
loss, and whether the earning capacity of the one killed 
should have anything, or all, to do with the verdict. It is 
rather a delicate subject, although as a rule the suitors for 
damages are not at all delicate about pressing their claims. 
Th re is something rather sordid in most damage claims 
— a disposition on the part of the claimants to take all 
the advantage possible of the financial opportunity that 
fate has thrown in their way, and a willingness to have 
their grief assuaged with a little if they cannot get a lot. 
The shrewdness of the lawyers and the flnanclal standing 
of the corporation sued often regulates the value of a loved 
one's life. 

A New Jersey Judge recently awarded one dollar damages 
in a case where a child had been killed, evidently naming 
this nominal sum merely to fasten the fault upon the de- 
fendant. In New York a Judge gave the parents a verdict 
for six cents, but this verdict was set aside by the Supreme 
Court, which held that the future earning capacity of the 
child should be considered. 

To judge damages by a child's earning capacity is very 
shocking to some. But is it so repulsive as to merely re- 
ceive money as a sop to shattered feelings. Would parents 
who claim damages acknowledge that the money obtained 
consoles them to any extent at all for the toss of the child? 
To acknowledge this shows a lack of affection. Not to 
acknowledge it merely shows an eye to the main chance. 



BETTER THAN STRIKING. 

A unique organization, and one which, if carried out along 
the right lines, will be productive of much good, is the 
"Consumers' League" of Chicago, organized three years 
ago, and now coming into prominence. The object of the 
League is to abolish, by discouragement, shops where cloth- 
ing is made under unsanitary or other conditions detrimental 
to the health of the employees — sweat-shops, in a word. 
Tne members of the League are mostly wealthy society 
women. They examine factories where dress-goods ana 
other fabrics are made, and if the proprietors are obeying 
the State factory laws they place the seal of their approval 
upon the output of the factory. They will not buy the pro- 
duct of sweat-shops. 

San Franciscans know little of the horrors of New York 
or Chicago factories, where men, women and children work 
in illy-ventilated, poorly-lighted rooms ten, twelve and four- 
teen hours a day. There are laws against such practices, 
but as is the case with many laws, negligence on the part 
of officials lessens its effectiveness. The methods adopted 
by the League show what may be done by education and 
persuasion. While it partakes of the nature of a boycott 
its methods are peaceful and non-combative. It is doing 
more to discourage sweat-shops and their methods than any 
amount of strikes. 



The Christian Scientists of Oakland have erected an 
$80,000 church. The price may seem stiff, but when you con- 
sider what a paying proposition Christian Science is you 
will concede that the money is safely invested. Eighty thou- 
sand dollars invested in a Christian Science church will 
bring in larger returns than the same amount sunk in a 
nail or shoe factory. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 



IS THE BATTLESHIP DOOMED? 

Naval architects and engineers are about agreed that the 
great battleship is no longer a danger, except to herself 
and her crew. During the recent maneuvres of the English 
Mediterranean fleet the destroyers were sent out some hours 
in advance of the battleships. The course to be steered by 
the latter was kept' secret and was purposely made as un- 
certain and as perplexing as possible. The destroyers were 
given two days in which to find the fleet, and within that 
time they did find it and planted blank shells against their 
hulls that in a real battle would have sunk every one of the 
ships attacked. Ten out of the fourteen admitted that "they 
were fairly bagged without so much as a chance at the 
attack." This admission by competent and responsible offi- 
cers is leading to a pretty general concensus of opinion on 
the part of naval authorities that the destroyer is the "ship 
of the future." In view of these developments the great naval 
powers are at a loss to tell what to do next. Many battle- 
ships are in course of construction, and there seemed every 
probability that their number would be increased. Yet if 
those ships are to prove only a danger to themselves and 
their occupants it would be idle to proceed with their con- 
struction. England has decreased the number of battle- 
ships she intended to commence this year by two, and will 
increase her torpedo destroyers by fifty. So significant 
a change is not going into actual fulfillment without some 
pretty strong proof of its wisdom. President Roosevelt 
and Secretary Long are very strenuously in favor of a 
greatly enlarged navy, but in view of what is going on 
around them, it would appear to be the part of discretion to 
go slow for awhile. The effectiveness of the torpedo has 
been so advanced that no battleship can escape her and no 
solid wall of Harveyized steel can resist the terrible on- 
slaughts of modernized maximite. Torpedoes will take 
to fighting each other at a combined speed of not less than 
sixty miles an hour, and that will be warfare such- as the 
world has not so far dreamed of. There will be no time to 
think. Such a battle may be all over in five minutes. There 
may be no room for tactics, the fight may be quicker than 
thought. The stricken is put hors du combat by a single 
biow. In such a fight everything tends to favor cheap craft 
that can be lost without that loss proving an irreparable 
disaster. The question becomes serious as to which nations 
can best supply the kind of men necessary to such warfare. 
They will be found among the descendants of Nelson's men- 
of-war's men. Fate has sent the United States this type. 
A naval writer in the Fortnightly says: "A thousand de- 
stroyers so manned would make the Steven Seas a British 
Lake. In the making nine hundred might be lost, but the 
enemy's flag would have disappeared forever, nor would any 
battleship float a week. This is not a solitary opinion, but 
is the gospel of the entire new generation of naval officers." 



WANTS NO MORE OF THE SAMPSON-SCHLEY 
CONTROVERSY. 

President Roosevelt has sat down upon the Schley-Samp- 
son controversy with a dull thud, as the sensational reports 
are accustomed to say. He was tired of it, believed that it 
ought never to have been given official attention, and that 
it was doing our navy harm in the eyes of other nations. 
Accordingly, he squelched the whole business most effect- 
ually the moment it reached him. He would have none of it 
— that he wouldn't! The two old salts, as became men of 
their profession, were still ready to continue the battle. 
Admiral Schley wanted to make mince-meat of the report 
of the majority, whilst Admiral Sampson, though on what 
is believed to be his death-bed, wrote for an opportunity to 
perform the same service for the report of the minority. 
Well it is for both of the brave old warriors that they were 
compelled to sheath their swords and live in peace. They 
had both done their duty in the hour of peril, and their coun- 
try is satisfied and grateful. That they were both eager 
to fight their battles over again may not be discreditable to 
their courage, but it says little for their discretion. Better 
had it been if Theodore Roosevelt had held his old place 
in the Navy Department when this most regrettable of 
controversies first broke out. In that case, it would never 
have gained headway. There remains no doubt that it was 



hatched in that department, and that Crowinshield was the 
brooding hen that brought it to light. If the President 
would send him to sea on active service, as ought to have 
been done long ago, Washington would be relieved of an 
intriguer and a marplot. Maclay, the so-called "historian, ' 
who had been given "a soft snap" in the Brooklyn navy yard 
to enable him to live whilst he wrote the Destroyer of the 
Spanish fleet down "a coward," was summarily told to go, 
and when he refused was put without the gates. It was a 
Roosevelt push, and of course that ended it. The censure of 
General Miles was not in accordance with the rules and regu- 
lations, and in any event went too far. Yet the general 
effect was good. It was evidence not to be mistaken that 
the President would brook no re-opening of the controversy. 
The case is closed. Admiral Schley has been sustained by 
the weight of authority, as well as by the general consensus 
of public opinion. He whose cause is espoused by Admiral 
Dewey and Commauder-in-Chief Miles, is beyond the neces- 
sity of paying further heed to the libels of an irresponsible 
spy in the navy yard, or to the intrigues of a sneak in the 
War Department. 



ELECTION OF CUBA'S FIRST PRESIDENT. 

Governor-General Woods' plans are going through in Cuba 
without a hitch. Senor Estrada Palma, who has just been 
i lected President, was plainly ear-marked as the candidate 
of General Woods and of our War Department. Maso was 
to be induced to accept the Vice-Presidency. The two were 
expected to be the docile team the military Governor could 
orive wheresoever be listed. But suddenly the reins were 
drawn just a little too tight on Maso, and his eyes were 
opened to the fact that he was being used. Forthwith he 
announced himself as a candidate tor the first place on the 
ticket. He explained in a political manifesto that he deemed 
it his patriotic duty to test the feeling of the country as to 
its desire for real as opposed to sham independence. He de- 
clared that he had been appealed to from all parts of the 
country to lend his name to a candidacy which would repre- 
sent "the genuine Cuban tradition." and which would aim 
at "saving from the general wreck at least the political lift 
of the country, the principles of the revolution, and the 
honor of Cubans." In his appeal for popular support. Maso 
did not think it wise or necessary to pay any compliments 
or show any gratitude to the American Government. He 
stoutly declared that the American intervention In Cuba 
had been perverted into a military occupation of conquest, 
and that under the Piatt amendment Cuba could never be- 
come an independent State. Yet, within the limitations im- 
posed upon them, he thought that the Cuban peopl: should 
proceed with firmness and steadiness of purpose to set up 
a Government that should be Cuban in fact as well as in 
I'.ame, and at the same time be able to maintain cordial re- 
lations with the United States. The success of such a can- 
didate would have meant the total miscarriage of the care- 
f.illy laid plans of Governor Woods and of the department 
he represents. Accordingly, Maso had to be defeated at all 
costs. Senor Palma represented the Cuban Junta at New 
York, long prior to and during our war with Spain. He be- 
came intimate with the speculators who have long kept a 
keen eye on Cuban affairs with a view to their ultimate profit. 
He will play into their hands without a doubt. It is the 
misfortune of Cubans that the long war for independence 
has exhausted their means. Their farms are mortgaged up 
to sixty-five per cent of their value. The seed for the com- 
ing crop has been advanced to them at usurous rates, and, 
worse than all, they only receive, after our duty is collected, 
fibout one and a half cents a pound for their sugar. Unless 
our Government is prepared to do without annexation that 
which it would have to do with it, the independence of Cuba 
is doomed. Unless given a market in the United States, 
the annexation of Cuba is inevitable. Her people will simply 
be starved into a form of Government against their will. 
It will be a very un-heroic ending to our high-falutin' prom- 
ises. 



Mr. B. C. Pettingell, of Oakland, has invented a projectile 
which, he says, will revolutionize modern warfare. Inven- 
tions that will "revolutionize warfare" have come in too 
niten to make much impression any more. Mr. Pettingell 
ought to make some kind of a new claim for his projectile. 



January II, 1902. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

MERE GOSSIP. 



By Betsy Bird. 



it ii not generally known that Kate Dnei Brighai 
■■■•■ of Mrs. Katharine Dnar Mackay, of Men Yorl 

la, Tiny fv.ii beat the same nanus. Miss Kate Is 
lest of honor at ■ rerj smart tea gl\. Mrs. 

y. Mrs. Hri. a was Misc. Tallanl 
has a fortune in her own right. Miss Qoev o! the 

glrla In San Francisco, speaking Prem 
ami Spanish with great ease. All the old set will 1. 
■plcuooa at the tea, for they always stir themscl 
the Brlghams are concerned. 

Mrs. Henry Scott's tea in honor of the young Martins will 
;y largely attended, for many invitations have been 
Mra, Scott has taken the position of being the official 
head of San Francisco society, and she alms at bringing 
together all that is best in it. following the large spirit of 
London and Washington. The Burlingame set, however, 
always dominates everything Mrs. Scott has, and so it will 
to-day. The Walter Martins leave to-morrow (Sunday) for 
New York, where they will be entertained by the Oelriclis, 
Mary Crocker Harrison, the Alexanders, and the Whitelaw 
Rcids. The Reids are the most conspicuous people socially 
In New York just at present, for they are chaperoning and 
bringing out with a dance their neiees, the famous twins 
of Mrs. Ogden Mills. Although Mrs. Mills, as a Livingstone, 
has unspeakable scorn of everything that is Western, she 
never hesitates about making use of her brother-in-law, Mr. 
Whitelaw Reid, a self-made man from the Middle West. She 
realizes that as ex-Ambassador to France, and the repre- 
sentative of this country abroad at the time of all great 
world events, he is a very convenient person to have about. 
New York friends tell me she cares more for his position 
than for the Mills millions. As Mrs. Henry Scott entertained 
the Reids lavishly while they were here the last time, they 
will reciprocate in New York, and so the Martins will see 
that city most advantageously. 

Mrs. Walter Dean has recovered her health, and she was 
at home Monday at the Palace, but her ordinary reception 
day is like a big swell tea. She was assisted in receiving 
by Mrs. Walter Dean, Jr., Miss Helen Dean and Miss Ethel 
Hager. Mrs. Dean and her daughter wore white. Mrs. 
Walter Dean, Jr., was in pink silk, and her sister, Miss Ethel 
Hager, wore a handsome pale blue gown. Dozens called 
during the afternoon. 

Before the divorce of the Avery McCarthys every one ad- 
mired what seemed to be the splendid strength and strong 
nerves of the beautiful Mrs. McCarthy. However, I hear 
that she is unusually sensitive to the unpleasantness of 
breaking up her home, and she can bear San Francisco no 
longer. She spent most of her time at the Richelieu, weep- 
ing over the loss of her little boy and the change in her for- 
tunes, and Anally went south to Santa Barbara for a change 
of scene. Helen Wagner, her half-sister, is left practically 
homeless, for she lived with Mrs. McCarthy for years. 
One of her most intimate friends is Bertha Dolbear, and she 
is to be her guest for several weeks. 

Muffs are decidedly the thing this winter among the very 
smart set. In fact, if you see a girl with a sable collar and 
muff, in nine cases out of ten she is in society. Only the 
real people dare carry a sable muff on a warm day. The 
others would be afraid of being laughed at. All of the Hop- 
kins girls, including Mrs. Will and Mrs. Gus Taylor, are. 
carrying muffs. Mrs. Jo 'i'objn has a beauty. I saw Bernie 
Drown the other day, very lithe and svelte after the new 
style, dressed in an automobile coat and holding a sable 
muff in her hands. Georgie Hopkins has a big flat pancake 
sable hat to match hers. Marie Oge is wearing a sable hat 
and muff, while her chum and cousin, Marie Wells, has the 
same thing in furs. Marie Wells's sable hat is trimmed with 
cream lace, and Marie Oge's with blue velvet. 

.Another mark of the Four Hundred at just this season is 
the velvet frock. Emily Hager has a smashing gown of black 
velvet, which she wears everywhere, for calls, matinees or 
wherever she pleases. It is quite simple, and the only trim- 
ming is her beautiful sable collar. Georgie Hopkins has a 
beautiful tailorish sort of a blue velvet frock, and it is made 
with the conventional Eton jacket. Her sister, Mrs. Gus 



Ilka II. «-xrcpt the . nlor Is 

black, m. >u. mi, who is iimplj plungtnt into 

this winl ra, is 

ii oklng eitri im-iy well in parpli 

i (dun. Iinv. , the sunn I 

■i this winter, ami hen Is of brown cordu- 
i , i ut with no and < >r style. 
Mis. Tolnii carries bei sable mull with this, and wears a 
walking hut. a style she bus worn on the sin. a with 
soma variations fur at bast six years. Mrs. Tobln is not 
only well- groomed herself, but she lias the smartest turn- 
outs of nearly any one in town. Her servants have perfect 
manners and try to live up to the tone of their mistress. 
Her coachman and footman are as well turned out as their 
employers. 

I do think Mamie McNutt Potter is the luckiest girl 
In town. Mr. Ashtou Potter is now in the city, and 
wherever he goes people stop and stare at him. for he looks 
exactly like one of Gibson's soldier boys, especially when 
he wears a grey morning suit with a grey soldier's hat. He 
is strikingly handsome — looks as if he had the blood of a 
thousand kings in his veins; and I have yet to see a soldier 
or officer who carries himself in such a military manner as 
this young man, who has been in the army not more than 
three years. When his mother dies he will have a big 
fortune, for Mrs. Howard Potter was an English lady, Miss 
Brown, a daughter of the millionaire London bankers of that 
name. As a Christmas gift Lieutenant Potter received from 
her a check for ten thousand dollars, and he doesn't know 
what to do with it. This would not puzzle the average army 
officer, but he has about fifteen thousand a year besides his 
salary. He expects to be ordered to Manila any moment, 
much to the distress of his wife, who has declared she will 
never return to such a wretched place. 



Connoisseurs always call for Old Crow Special, col- 
ored label. It has made a reputation as the best whisky 
made and is to be found at all first-class bars. 



A. de LIZE & FILS 



BORDEAUX. 




Fine Clarets 
and Sauternes 



In Cases, Quarts, and Pints 



CHARLES MEINECKE-&CO. 

Sole Agents, 
814 Sacramento St., San Franc'sco, 




College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dom- 
inic. Opens August 1, 1901. Full col- 
lege course of studies. Modern Build- 
ing; steam heated. Unsurpassed for 
beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, .1 




'Bkusure's 

Wand 



G/eo&ey 



*y no wand but Pitatur&'s . 

Tom Jfoon, 




The late Robert Duncan Milne once declared that a life of 
continual sobriety was vapid, insipid and uninteresting. 
Conundrum: Why is the Modjeska-James presentation of 
"Henry VIII" at the Columbia like a life of continual 
sobriety? No prize — the answer is too easy. 

Once upon a time Madam Modjeska was a great actress 
— an actress who twisted heartstrings and brought tears, 
who sent audiences away dazed and bewildered at her art. 
Some actresses hold their power longer than others; Madam 
Modjeska has lost hers. She has yet all the brilliant tech- 
nique, consummate art and finish that distinguished her in 
her palmy days. Every movement, every gesture, show her 
an actress to the finger-tips, every intonation and inflection 
of her voice recall past glory; but her voice is hollow and 
feeble now, and her step lags; her movements show the 
worn-out woman, battling with waning strength against the 
creeping years. To see her is like watching a perfectly- 
made marionette, mechanically correct but without life or 
soul. Once in a while, as Queen Katherine, there is a flash 
of old-time virility, a fleeting reminiscence; but these 
periods are short. 

There are those who demand adulation for Modjeska on 
account of what she has been. We are all willing to grant 
her that if she will be willing to retire upon her honors. 
To see her now makes one almost forget what she once 
was. 

Mr. Louis James played Cardinal Wolsey, as the pro- 
gramme has it. If I remember rightly, the Cardinal's name 
used to be spelled with several more l's and s's. The Colum- 
bia's phonetic way of spelling it dispels hesitation and ex- 
pedites pronunciation. Mr. James has always been away 
above mediocrity, just escaping greatness in some respects, 
yet always keeping in the shadow of the pinnacle. He> 
does not do anything to distinguish himself as the Cardi- 
nal. It hardly bores, yet it does not thrill or interest to any 
great extent. His enunciation is good and his reading 
fairly intelligent, but there are no moments of suspense — 
no leaning forward of the auditors or craning of necks — 
and no applause to speak of. In fact, about the only thing 
that causea any hand-clappings in the whole performance 
vere the beautiful minuet, the singing in the last act, and 
the stage settings. 

Mr. Norman Hackett played the King. There was nothing 
about his rendition to distinguish it from that of any ordi- 
nary player. The same may be said of Miss Aphie James' 
portrayal of Annie Bullen. As for the other members of the 
company, it is charity to not mention their names. 

The stage settings are superb beyond almost anything 
ever seen here — bewildering in their gorgeous sumptuous- 
ness. It is easy to believe that two cars were needed to 
transport the scenery. The costumes are equally good. 
» » * 

The Alcazar company has been giving an uneven per- 
formance of "The Wife" this week. There is nothing wrong 
with the play — it is a good emotional drama, dealing rather 
Ihsenesquely with the problem of the wife who married the 
man she merely respected while her heart was another's. 
There are some good lines in it, and one or two telling 
situations. There is plenty of comedy, too, which lightens 
an otherwise Tather slow performance. Mr. Alsop, the lead- 
ing man, seems to be out of his element. He is a good 
comedian, and where strenuosity is called for he lacks lit- 
tle. This is demonstrated in the third act, when, in his in- 
terview with Culver (impersonated by Mr. Howard Scott) 
he awakes from a seeming lethargy and gives the audience 
a few moments of refreshingly vigorous acting. But when 
he is called upon to stand around and indulge in ordinary 
conversation he does little or nothing to impress one. 

Miss Marion Convere is very disappointing in "The Wife," 
giving a lifeless, colorless rendition of the part. Miss Mar- 
garet Wycherly was the villainess — "that sarpint," as an 
old lady behind me characterized her. Miss Wycherly 



does well in this part. 

Miss Juliet Crosby as the widow is very chic and chi 
ing, and wears some dazzling gowns. 

Miss Oza Waldorp, who plays Kitty, is a merry, sprig 
ingenue. Her whole performance shows intelligence ai 
thorough appreciation of her lines. Mr. Frank Bacoi 
Major Putnam is the principal laugh-provoker of the ] 
He has the happy faculty of always reminding one of sc 
body one has known — very unlike many actors, who 
semble phonographs. Mr. Bacon is one of those gf 
faced comedians, always apparently carrying a weigh! 
woe, and always, by reason of his gravity, convulsi' 
amusing. 

Mr. George Osbourne, the old Alcazar favorite, has 
turned, and as Silas Truman, wins hearty approval. 
Shumer as the hero, Robert Gray, is not conspicuously gi 
Mr. Howard Scott is an excellent arch-plotter. 

• * • 

"Lost in New York" is not to be considered seriously fl 
the standpoint of those who are looking ror the deva 
ment of the drama; but seen through the eyes of those 1 
want thrilling situations, heart interest, wrongs riga 
and rascality punished, and who like a little comedy ml 
with their tragedy and thunder, it is just about peri 
It is what the audiences at the Central want, and theyj 
showing their appreciation by crowding the theatre nigB 

The long-lost child discovered by the blind mother, wB 
a designing relative is trying to beat out of her inheritaj 
has always won and always will. That is the basis of E 
in New York, and there are all sorts of plots and count 
plots. Georgie Cooper is the heroine, the waif, the lo 
lost child. Her shrewdness is a menace to the machinati 
of her uncle and others, and she is railroaded to an ins: 
asylum. She escapes by jumping out of a window, and s\« 
ming through a tank of real water (I hope It was real wj 
water) the full length of the stage. This, of course, is] 
great scene of the play; mechanically and thrillingly, it is 
that could be asked for. 

Miss Cooper is developing into quite an actress. Shj 
pery young yet, but is losing a lot of the disagreeable at 
tations she had when still younger. She has a good com) 
turn along with her other talents, and sings well. 

Margaret Marshall played the blind mother with cool 
erable feeling, using the slow, halting utterance evide( 
thought to be necessary by most stage people in portrajj 
the sightless. Mr. George Webster had a heroic-comedy pi 
acquitting himself with his usual credit. 

The play was well staged and fairly well played throu 
out. None of the Central people are very objectiona) 
and some of them are decidedly worth while. 

• • • 

The Orpheum has some good people this week. Inuadi 
a wonder, doing mental arithmetic in a way that mi 
people gasp, giving solutions of all sorts of mathematl 
problems with astonishing rapidity, ease and accurs 
Girard and Gardner present a very bright sketch. "The S 
brette and the Cop," which is cleverly done. They have b 
seen here before, but their sketch is as popular as 81 

The three Westons are entertaining musical artists, i 
Mr. Alt Holt is a whistler who produces all sorts of melo 
He also gives some fine imitations. 

Jessie Dale, the girl baritone, as she is called, has b 
giving a return engagement. She has an extremely gi 
contralto voice of great range. She is young yet, and 
trained, but her voice promises very much indeed. 

• * * 

The Tivoli keeps promising us "The Ameer," but "Lit 
Red Riding Hood" remains so popular that it is still kept 
Mr. Ferris Hartman is still throwing his admirers into com 
sions with his funny songs, sayings and faces; and as 1< 
as his power to charm holds out, what is the use of cha 
ing? Of course, Mr. Hartman is not the whole shi 
Annie Meyers is a considerable part of it. The charac 
of Boy Blue seems to fit her as snugly as the clothes I 
wears in the part, and her voice retains all its freshne 
Miss Annie Wilson is singing the part of the Queen Fa) 
this week. Although she took the part at an hour's notl 
she went through it without an error, and has been sing! 
it charmingly. 

W. J. W 



January 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



second and final WMk of th« ModJeska-JamM en 
gagdnent at the Columbia Theatre will begin Monday night. 
Tne repertoire hns been arranged as follows: Monday and 
Saturday nights. "Macbeth," Tuesday and Saturday matinee, 
' Mary Stuart." Wednesday and Friday nights. The Km 
(hant of Venice," and Thursday night, "Henrj VIII." "The 
Princess Chic," a comic opera production, comes next. Mr. 
ilofrmanu. the pianist, will appear at the Columbia oil 
the afternoons of January 28th and 31ot. 

* • • 

The third and last of the first series of symphony concerts, 
under the auspices of the San Francisco Symphony Society, 
will take place at the Grand Opera House next Friday after- 
noon, January 17th, at 3:15 sharp, under Direr tor Paul 
Steindorff. The final programme is as follows: 1. Donna 
Diana, Overture (first time), E. Von Reanicek; 2. Traume 
(Dreams), arranged for orchestra by Johan Svendsen, R. 
Wagner; 3. Scenes Pitteresque, (a) Marche. (b) Air de Bal- 
let, (c) Angelus, (d) Fete Boheme, J. Massenet; 4. Sym- 
I bony (Jupiter) C Major. W. A. Mozart. Reserved seats 
will be ready at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Tuesday morning, 
January 14th, at nine o'clock, prices ranging from a dollar 
and a half to fifty cents. 

* * * 

There Wi.l be one more week of "Little Red Riding Hood" 
at the Tivoli, and on Monday, January 20th, "The Ameer" 
will be put on. Mr. Harold Gordon, a new tenor, will make 
his appearance in it. Frances Graham will sing the con- 
tralto part, and there are several new people in the cast. 

* * * 

"For the White Rose," a play of medieval times, will be 
produced at the Alcazar next week. The play is new to San 
Trancisco, and deals with the War o£ the Roses. The lead- 
ing character, Larry Kavanagh, is played by Mr. M. L. Al- 
sop. The others in the cast will be: Mr. Paul Gerson, Sir 
Giles Acton; Mr. George Osbourne, Hugh Kitel; Mr. Frank 
Bacon, Simple Peter; Mr. Howard Scott, Edmund Ball. The 
women will be Miss Wycherly, Miss Convere, Miss WalJorp, 
and Miss Howe. 

* * * 

Kara, the juggler, will re-appear at the Orpheum next 
week. The three Faust sisters, Rosie, Daisy and Vera, 
dancers from Australia, will make their first appearance 
here. Mr. Arthur Buckner is a trick bicycle rider. The 
hold-overs are Inuanda, Girard and Gardner, Holt, Mr. and 
Mrs. Gardner Crane, and the Mograph. 

* * * 

On Thursday evening, January 16th, a dramatic recital 
will be given at Sherman-Clay Hall by Miss Eleanor C. 
Haber, who is soon going East to follow her profession. She 
will be assisted by Mr. Albert I. Elkus, pianist, and Mr. 
Harry Samuels, violinist. 



IN TROUBLE AGAIN. 



Once again the First National Bank, of which S. G. Mur- 
phy is the president, has involved itself in serious trouble, 
and has a damage suit for $100,000 on its hands. It seems 
that on January 29, 1900, Smith's Cash Store, of this city, 
issued a check on the First National Bank for $3,750. The 
firm was able and willing at that time to pay more than the 
amount of the check, but in spite of that fact the bank re- 
fused to honor the check. The result was that the firm was 
pressed by its creditors, and was forced to make an assign- 
ment. It has continued its business, but claims to have been 
damaged to the extent of $100,000. All this will not be a 
surprise to people who are acquainted with the methods of 
this prince of Hibernian Shylocks, S. G. Murphy. The plain- 
tiffs seem to have an excellent case and all fair-minded 
people hope to see them receive the full amount of damages 
asked for. It would be a good thing for the First National 
Bank if the Directors at their next meeting would put a 
banker in as president instead of a man with all the in- 
stincts of a pawnbroker. 



Mrs. M. W. Beach, formerly of the Plankington House, 
Milwaukee, is now manager of the Earl'ecourt, at 1011 Pine 
street. Mrs. Beach has had long experience in the hotel 
business, and it is safe to say that the Earlecourt under her 
management will continue to be, as it has been in the past, 
the most exclusive private hotel in San Francisco. 



BPSS&E 






V- 



$*? 



THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS 
A FULL QUART OF FINE OLD VIRGINIA RYE. THOROUGHLY 
AGED IN WOOD.BY THE ADDITION OF HONEY AND 
HOREHOUND ITS MELLOWNESS .TONE AND MEDICINAL 
PROPERTIES HAVE BEEN MATERIALLY ENHANCED AS ATONIC. 
STIHULANT AND GENERAL INVIGOBATOR.ITIS UNSURPASSED. 



•S01DINGLASS ONLY- 



ONE FULL QUART- 



O I San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

I PneUm . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, January 12. 

KARA THE GREAT; Three Fauat Sisters; Arthur Buckner; 
dACQUES IN AUDI, Girard and Gardner; Three Westons; AK. 
Holt: The Biograph, and Last Week of Mr- and Mrs. Gardner Crane. 
Reserved seats, 25c; Balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 50o. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday - 

A|____,_ Tk«^l — «. Bblasco & Thall. Managers. 
icazar I neatre. phoneMain 254 

Commencing: Jan. 13. Owen Davis Romantic Comedy Drama, 

FOR THE WHITE ROSE 

The first time on the Pacific Coast. Declared to be the greatest play 

ever written on the age of chivalry. 

Regular Matinee Saturday and Sunday. Secure seats in advance by 

telephoning to Box Office, Main 254. 

Prices, 15j, 25c, 35c, 50c and 75c. 

C/Olumbia Theatre. B ' Lessees anS Managers. 

Beginning Next Monday, January 13th. Second and last week 

MODcJESKA and cJAMES 

in the following repertoire: 

Monday and Saturday Nights, MACBETH. Tuesday Night and 

Sa'urday Matinee, MARY STUART. Wednesday and Friday 

Nights, THE MERCHANT OF VENICE. Thursday Night, 

HENRY UNI. 

Coining — "The Princess Chic." 

Prices— 81.50. 81 . 75c, 50c. 35o and 25c. 

Grand Opera House. — SPECIAL 

Friday Afternoon, Jan. 17, at 3.15 sharp. Third Sumbhoni| Concert 

under the auspices of the 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

Paul Steindorff, Director. 

Oroheetra of Fifty-five musicians. Giulio Minetti. Concertmelster, 
Reserved seats: 81.50, 81.00, 75c and 50o. On snle at Sherman. Clay ." 
Co.'s Tuesday morning, January 14tb, at 9 o'clock. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse, 



Mrs. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp! 
Week of January 13th. Last of the Jolly Holiday Piece, 

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD 

Monday, January 20— the Ameek, with a Splendid Company. 
Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the fine 
wines, beers and supper. 
The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering place after the theatr 
la over 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




Forestry is a science that is becom- 
Forest Trees and ing more and more familiar to us, and 
Forest Scenery. a book, the leading object of which 

is an appreciation of the esthetic 
value of some of our commonest forest trees, is one to be 
thankful for. Such an one is "Forest Trees and Forest 
Scenery," by Mr. G. Frederick Schwarz. In the opening 
chapter the writer says: "The beauty of a forest is not 
simply in character, but is due to many separate sources. 
The trees contribute much; the shrubs, the rocks, the 
mosses play their part; the purity of the air, the forest 
silence; the music of wind in the trees — these and other 
influences combine to produce woodland beauty and charm." 
But to know the beauty that is revealed by the trees them- 
selves is the first consideration. The rarest are not neces- 
sarily the most beautiful. Those that are commonest and 
most useful are often distinguished for qualities that please 
the eye or appeal directly to the mind. The broad-leaf 
trees and the cone-bearers are first described, and the 
characteristics of the broadleaf and coniferous forests con- 
sidered. The distribution of American forests, and forest 
adornment, are the subjects discussed in two other chapters. 
In concluding, by way of contrast, the writer has given a 
short account of the esthetic effects of the artificial forests 
of Europe, and has something to say of the national forest 
reserves of the United States. These became established, 
it will be remembered, by an act of Congress of March 3, 
1891, which empowered the President to segregate from time 
to time, and for the benefit of the American people, forest 
areas situated within the limits of the public lands of the 
United States. In accordance with this act, proclamations 
were issued by Presidents Cleveland, Harrison and McKin- 
ley, reserving forest areas amounting thus far to 40,398,369 
acres, or nearly 72,500 square miles. The groves of sequoias, 
the geological wonders of the Yellowstone, the specimens 
of Arctic fauna still living among the glaciers of Mount 
Rainier, are national possessions of great interest, of which 
Americans may well be proud. Numerous illustrations re- 
produced from photographs, and an index to the names of 
the trees described by Mr. Schwarz, with their synoayms 
in common use, supplement a volume that will prove valu- 
able not only to students of forestry, but interesting as 
well to those true lovers of nature who, like Wordsworth, 
believe that: 

"One impulse from a vernal wood 

May teach you more of man, 
Of moral evil and of good, 

Than all the sages can." 
The Grafton Press, Publishers, New York. 

It is quite certain that nothing con- 

The Real Latin tributed more to the success of Du 

Quarter. Maurier's "Trilby" than the somewhat 

idealized glimpses he gave of the Latin 
Quarter in Paris. And now comes a new book, "The Real 
Latin Quarter," in which the author, Mr. F. Berkeley Smith, 
presents in most alluring fashion bits of that life so unlike 
any other under the sun, the life of that renowned Bohemia 
of Paris, "le Quartier Latin." Mr. Smith is a Princeton man, 
class of '91. His versatility has manifested itself iu many 
ways. He is a fair musician, an architect of some ability, 
and has achieved distinction as an illustrator and decorator. 
He is a son of Mr. F. Hopkinson Smith, the well-known 
author and artist, who has furnished the introduction to his 
son's book and a water-color sketch as frontispiece. In 
order to better understand the subtle charm of the most 
unconventional life in the world, Mr. F. Berkeley Smith 
studied his subject and compiled his impressions in the very 
atmosphere of the place itself, living for many months at 
a time within a stone's throw of the Luxembourg Gardens 
and the Pantheon, near the cafes and the far-famed Bullier. 
With pen and brush and camera he depicts in a very realis- 



tic way students and singers, grisettes and beggars, bicycle 
girls and shop-girls, sweethearts and sculptors, and poets 
and beggars, and the many "types" to be seen along the 
"BouV Mirlic." Mr. Smith's style is bright and pleasing 
and he has grasped amazingly well certain phases of the 
Parisian nature. He notes their scent after new sensations 
as manifested in their deep interest for the time being 
in automobiling and ballooning, their continual race for 
pleasure, their charming pleasantry and never-failing polite- 
ness, and their affection for dear Paris — "the Paris of youth, 
of love, and of romance." Sketches and photographs by 
the author, and two drawings by Sancha, the noted French 
caricaturist, are generously scattered through the book. 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.20. 

Nicholas Chase, a young man 
The Great White Way. with a dream of discovery, and 

an inherited love of the sea; 
Chauncey Gale, a merry millionaire, with a willingness to 
back his judgment; Edith Gale, his daughter, a girl with 
accomplishments and ideas; Zar, colored maid and former 
nurse of Edith Gale, a woman with no "fool notions" about 
the South Pole; Ferratoni. an Italian electrician with wire- 
less communication and subtle psychic theories; Captain 
Joseph Biffer, Master of the Billowcrest, an old salt with 
little respect for wild expeditions; Terence Larkins, First 
OfiBcer of the Billowcrest, wuh a disregard of facts; Mr. 
Emory, Second Officer of the Billowcrest; William 
Sturritt, steward of the Billowcrest, and inventor of 
condensed food tablets; Frenchy, a bos'n who stirs up trou- 
ble; Prince of the Purple Fields, a gentle despot of the 
Port of Dreams; Princess of the Lilied Hills, his Serene 
Sister, whose domain is the deepest South, three maidens 
of the Land of Dreams and Lotus; a shipwrecked sailor, 
whose rescue is important to all concerned, with cabin boy, 
stewardess and crew of the Billowcrest, courtiers, etc., make 
up the dramatis personam of "The Great White Way," Mr. 
Albert Bigelow Paine's entertaining record of an unusual 
voyage of discovery. How Nicholas Chase reached the Land 
of the Heart's Desire, somewhere in the Antarctics, 

"Where nobody ever grows old and crafty and wise — 
Where nobody ever grows false and bitter of tongue." 

is told in alluring fashion by the writer, who makes very 
real the attraction of the long polar night in an enchanted 
land bathed in the light of an eternal afternoon, where may 
be found "the anodyne of forgetfulness and rest." 

J. F. Taylor & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

Marguerite Bryant, the perpe- 
The Princess Cynthia, trator of "The Princess Cynthia," is 
evidently an admirer — or shall we 
say absorber? — of Anthony Hope and Egerton Castle. The 
book is reminiscent of so many other scenes and characters 
and events, that it is hard to realize that it is fresh from 
the publisher's hand. The scene is laid in a mythical king- 
dom of the Old World. The Princess Cynthia is lost in the 
forest adjoining the royal hunting preserves, and a proud 
young lord comes to her rescue. Of course he becomes 
madly infatuated with the beautiful and wilful princess, who, 
notwithstanding the fact that she is pledged to a neighbor- 
ing king, meets the aforesaid proud young lord under the 
tall hollyhocks and blue and white canterbury-bells of her 
garden. She finds to her sorrow that "many waters cannot 
quench love, and neither the floods drown it." The proud 
young lord comes to an untimely end, and the princess is 
left lamenting. To be perfectly consistent, the writer has 
chosen not only a mythical kingdom as a setting for her 
story, but for her characters the most absolutely unheard-of 
names that it was possible to manufacture, a sort of Vola- 
puk nomenclature, as absurd as the cover design — which 
suggests the Crusades — is inappropriate. 

Funk & Wagnalls Company, Publishers, New York, Price, 
$1.20. MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



January 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 






i 



Gown C) 



own \~ner 



:C\s* 



'ffttrtln Cnv>'.lfti*< Iht dttll art ' «•« ' 




For ladies clad in garments thin 

The dinner Jacket's coming in. 

While winter draughts are blowing colder 

Across Miladi's unclad shoulder. 

Why evening dress of scanty mesh 
If she must hide her dimpled flesh? — 
Why not wear shirt-waists hemmed and gored, 
Or sealskin jackets to the board? 

Perdition take the cautious maid 
Who is by biting chills dismayed — 
Better a thousand coughs and sneezes 
Than hide one dimpled arm that pleases. 

It is up to England to bestir herself and outdo the doings 
at Peking last Tuesday morning, the day the Imperial Court 
entered the Forbidden City. The spectacle knocks anything 
King Edward proposes to do. There were a thousand gor- 
geously appareled noblemen upon a thousand glitteringly 
caparisoned horses. The English will outdo them in point 
of numbers, but I'll bet the color display won't come up to 
the Mongolian kaleideoscope. Then the royal ones were 
borne in yellow chairs, with thousands of attendants carry- 
ing banners and umbrellas of all colors. I'll wager there 
won't be an umbrella at the coronation unless it rains. A 
double row of kneeling troops lined the four-mile route. 
If a Tommy Atkins kneels to Edward I'll eat him. Alto- 
gether, I think the coronation will be wishy-washy beside 
this glorious Chinese spectacle, and wouldn't wonder if 
the King calls it off altogether on reading the despatches 
from Peking. 

I would like to give you a little advice, Mayor Schmitz. 
It is suggested by your speech at the State Labor Convention 
at Vallejo last Tuesday. You said, in part: "You have not 
painted the Employers' Association half black enough. They 
have been taught to lie down like a good dog, and will not 
be in a hurry to get up again." That was a very impolitic 
remark, Mayor Schmitz, besides being totally untrue. You 
know as well as I do that the Employers' Association 
came out of the recent fight with flying colors. You know, 
too, that the strikers got enough to last them for many years. 
And you should know, above all, Mayor Schmitz, that such 
remarks from the Mayor-elect of a great city, just when 
we have settled down to peace after one of the greatest 
strikes in our history, is very nearly indecent. I hope 
there will be no strikes while you are in office. Our last 
turmoil would be as nothing to what would happen. 

It has developed that Mrs. Rosa Kilburn, of Santa Rosa, 
who accused Messrs. Prank Morrissey, Martin Flynn and 
Thomas Crouch of assaulting and robbing her, was drunk 
on the night the alleged assault took place and fell over a 
thirty-foot embankment. Nevertheless, she complained to 
a policeman, who arrested the men mentioned, and horri- 
ble accounts of their depravity were published. Now, the 
facts have come out, and they have been honorably dis- 
charged. I was suspicious of Mrs. Kilburn's story from the 
first, hut did not care to accuse a decent woman. Like 
Mrs. Foote, who really was assaulted, she was middle-aged. 
What can we expect of the younger generation if women on 
the shady side of the age line go batting around town at 
midnight, not only looking upon but partaking of the booze 
that, is red? 

Wednesday's Chronicle contains a press dispatch relating 
the success of Oscar Wilde's play, "The Importance of Be- 
ing in Earnest.' " The Chronicle has made a discovery. 
The fact that Oscar Wilde wrote such a play and kept it 
secret so long comes little short of being a literary sensa- 
tion. 



Dr. Alfred L. Kroeber „f the UnlVWVtt? of California, you 
arc a Rrcat num. for you have at last found a use for tha 
phonograph. l'p tin now i have always supposed thai tha 
chief destiny c.r the machine was to soneah and sputter 
tha cheapeal and wore! of it hails into the ears 

of farmers and little boys foolish enough to squander nickels 
into the slot. Hut you. Dr. Kroeber, have found a greater 
future tor the Bdiaon invention. You have put your phono- 
■-vapli under your right arm and have gone abroad among 
the Northern Indian tribes and taken a record of their 
fast-disappearing songs and speeches. This is indeed a 
valuable work and will give our posterity a very accurate 
Idea of the speech of the Northern tribes, as instance the 
wording of that almost extinct song, "A Hot Time," as sung 
Iv a Market-street phonograph: 

"Whe tho beh go ting-a-li-a-li 

All join een and a chorus we we si, 

And whe the toon is done — e — e — e — e — e — e e! 

Tha be a hotime een Old Tow to nil — e — e — e! ! !" 

Again Chinatown is to be bonded out of existence. The 
Crier was in his youth when he first heard that. But sup- 
pose we set a good example by improving the white man's 
Chinatown. Its existence is not recent, and it possesses in 
a modified but still obnoxious degree all the objectionable 
elements of Chinatown except the feminine contingent. The 
location is below Montgomery street, on Merchant, and 
elsewhere in that neighborhood. There are narrow, unclean 
alleys, unsavory remnants of '49. For accumulated filth, 
unmentionable smells, and a congestion of human beings 
it is unequaled in our entire community. Some advocate 
letting the inhabitants remain in peace and dirt because they 
seem to like it. But the Crier would remind you that out of 
that neighborhood come your Sunday chickens, your sal- 
mon, sole, porterhouse steaks, and other dainties. Do you 
like the thought of that? I recommend that the health in. 
spectors exercise their nostrils in that nauseous neighbor- 
hood. 

"What is a package?" Hearst enquires, 

Intending thus to poke 
His friend Bohemia in the ribs 

And make a public joke. 

He's offered prizes named in cash 

To every tike and scrub 
vVho best an answer may invent 

To josh the hated club. 

I've read the answers up to date 

From very bad to worst, 
Where each cheap satire, missing aim, 

Has made a fool of Hearst. 

I see that a man named Simmons, an itinerant evangelist, 
has created an uproar in Alturas by alleging to have ex- 
tracted confessions from the lynchers of the Calvin Hall 
crowd. While everyone is anxious to see these lynchers 
brought to justice, it would be well to look out for any evi- 
dence brought in by this man Simmons. He is the cheapest 
kind of a faker. I know him, and will state for the benefit 
of those fortunate enough not to number him among 
their acquaintances that he is of the lowest type of traveling 
preacher, unkempt, ignorant, coarse and uncouth. He claims 
to be a hypnotist, and has a son whom he is initiating into 
his own dirty way of making a living. Simmons has been in 
trouble all over the State, and is a charlatan of the rankest 
sort. 

I hope and trust, my good ladies, that when Violinist Jan 
Kubelik comes to this coast you will remember your man- 
ners and kiss him very gently. They are not very civilized in 
New York, and that accounts in part for the unseemly ac- 
tions of the fair, who tore off his clothes, shook all the pins 
out of his hair, and kissed him within an inch of his life 
in the supreme enthusiasm of art. I have arranged it with 
his advance agent, who is a relative of Kisser Hobson, I 
am given to understand, that there shall be a special kissing 
reception given after every performance, and that one kiss 
shall be allowed with every ticket valued at three dollars 
or over. I am also trying to fix it so that kissing matinees 
can be given once a week at popular prices. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




Recently I told a' thing or two about Madam Katherine 
Tingley and why she is unpopular in San Diego. The 
Madam's propensity for grabbing everything in sight seems 
to have militated very successfully toward making her the 
theosophical Czarina of Point Loma, but it does not tend 
to raise her on an altar of love in the estimation of her fel- 
low townsmen. Her latest acquisition concerns an under- 
taker's horse, an animal as uneheerful as that sung in the 
dismal numbers of Mr. Rudyard Kipling. It seems that the 
dead of San Diego are buried by two rival firms, who vie 
with each other in the splendor of their equipages. About 
a year ago Undertaker Primus got ahead of Undertaker 
Secondus by importing a handsome pair of thoroughbred 
coal-black hearse horses. He is a young man and somewhat 
of a swell in his way, so he caused a deal of comment by 
using those sable steeds as carriage horses and taking his 
best girl out driving behind them on Sundays and holidays. 
Thereat the eyes of Undertaker Secondus became a bit 
green, and he was not long in sending away for a pair as 
fine and as expensive as those of his rival, but of the unblem- 
ished whiteness of a shroud. Madam Tingley, whose eyes 
are so sharp as to make one believe that there is something 
after all in second sight, saw those snowy horses and they 
tickled her spiritual sensorium so much that she sent for 
Undertaker Secondus and had a long talk with him. Result: 
The undertaker became a convert to theosophy, and as a 
pledge of his loyalty presented the white horses to Madam 
Tingley. Now a familiar sight in San Diego is a fine brougham 
drawn by a dashing white team which is in no wise suggest- 
ive of a graveyard — and sitting easily among the cushions 
i:; the visible, un-astral body of Maaam Katherine Tingley. 
Some of her enemies accuse her of being a hypnotist, but 
personally I believe her to be a very clever woman who knows 
how to get what she wants without the unpleasant neceS' 
sity of footing the bills. 

• • « 

The audiences who witnessed the Gatling gun drill at the 
Orpheum last week heartily applauded the quick work done 
by the gun crew, and paid particular attention to the cap- 
tain who directed the movements of the men. As far as I 
could see the drill was about perfect, except that the 
officer kept his sword in his scabbard while giving orders. 
I remember hearing Captain Miller of this city reproached 
by General Anderson for the same thing. 

It was at Cavite, only a few days before the assault on 
Manila, and Captain Miller was putting a Gatling gun crew 
(members of the First California) tnrough the paces. Gen- 
eral Anderson rode up, looked on for a moment, then 
snapped out: "Captain Miller, now and hereafter, when you 
are giving orders, keep your sword in your hand, and not in 
its scabbard — not for use, but so you won't forget that you 
have one." Then turning to his companion he remarked 
ferimly: 

"I'll put the fear of God into the hearts of these volun- 
teers." 

* * * 

Do you remember the great air-ship hoax which was 
abroad in this town some three or four years ago — the 
time when staid citizens were gazing open-mouthed into the 
astral regions while bad little boys were yelling "rubber" 
from the sidewalk? Well, we came very near to having one 
like it started by the Call not so long ago. It seems that 
an enterprising genius out on North Beach has invented an 
aeroplane, which he faithfully believes will float on ether; 
so, to boom his business he sent communications and photo- 
graphs to the Call people, telling them the wonders of his 
invention. One of the pictures exhibited almost knocked 
the city editor off his chair, for it represented the owner of 
the machine in mid-air calmly guiding the ship aloft above 
the roofs and chimneys of the town. The ship was not a 
Santos-Dumont affair, but a genuine aeroplane, which flew 



as a bird flies by the motion of its wings. The thing seemed 
incredible, but there was the photograph for it, and photo- 
graphs are supposed to tell no lies. The city editor, seeing 
visions of the scoop of the century, rushed to the rooms of 
the managing editor and showed him the picture. The latter 
\>as equally mystified, and called for the head of the art 
staff. The latter knew a thing or two about optical illu- 
sions and photographic fakes, so he had a little microscope 
focussed on the print with startling results. The "ship," 
as it proved, had been fastened from above by piano wires, 
which were perfectly invisible in the photograph. The man 
in the car proved to be a stuffed dummy, who was just as 
good for the job as a real man — lots better in case of an 
accident. The owner intends to form a corporation and sell 
stock on his ship, I am told, but he had better take my ad- 
vice and keep out of it. The airship has a future, but it will 
not be helped along by rank fakes of the ten-cent stocks 
\ ariety. 

• * * 

Mayor James D. Phelan's friends are much amused over 
his recent experience which seemed on the verge of romance, 
but ended in being funny. The Mayor is an athlete, and one 
of the best riders in town — so he rides daily in the park. 

He was passing down the boulevard during the past month 
and he was startled to find a woman waving her hands in the 
air, giving him the signals of distress. He approached, anci 
found her a beautiful, brown-eyed maiden of eighteen. Lift- 
ing his hat he asked how he might serve her, and she 
melted into tears, sobbing: "Oh, I have lost my beautiful 
dog. He has been stolen, I am positive. Have you seen 
him anywhere? He was a darling spaniel pup. I think those 
working men on the beach have him. They are only two 
miles away. Won't you please ride up there and take him 
away from them?" 

Mayor Phelan was a little startled, as he is not in the habit 
of hunting for the lost dogs of even beautiful forlorn maid- 
ens, but her wish was a command. He rode like Sheridan 
as he went to join his troops, and returned to tell the strange 
girl that the pup was not to be found. 

Again he was about to ride away when the girl called. "Oil, 
do you know Mrs. Blank?" He did very well, as she is a 
prominent society woman here. "I am staying with her.'" 
went on the girl, "and won't you please find her for me in 
the park, where she is driving, and tell her I am over here?" 

The lady could not be found, but a few days later the 
Mayor met her driving in the Park, accompanied by the 
stranger, and the girl recognized the man who had served 
her. Her hostess introduced them, and the maiden, who is 
from the interior, has not yet stopped blushing because she 
ordered about the Mayor of this big city as if he were a 
school boy. 

• * • 

Mr. Sol Bloom, the publisher of popular songs, who is to 
blame for the breaking out of "Coon, Coon, Coon," has been 
in town for the past week or two watching his business on 
this end of the continent. The man who publishes popular 
songs is more sore beset by cranks than the editor who 
prints poetry, and Mr. Bloom was obliged to hire a man 
especially to keep off the starving geniuses who flock to the 
Palace Hotel with unpublished hits of the season. He 
showed me a sample of the kind of stuff he had to buck 
up against. The song came by mail and was accompanied 
by a note which explained that it was a dialect song and 
"ought to kech on like wild-fire out West." Here is the first 
verse: 

"John Thompson was a very good man 

And worked in a founderay; 
He always did bring his wages home 
And worked hard ev'ry day." 

"I admire your San Francisco enterprise." he said, after 
a hard week battling with the songsters. "I picked up two 
songs by San Francisco writers while here, and I think they 
will be whistled on the street when they come around this 
way on the circuit." 

• * * 

It was a literary dispute of considerable calibre. On one 
side of the table sat Mr. Gelett Burgess and on the other 
Mr. B. J. S. Cahill, the architect, who forms a unit in the 



Jtnutry 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•3 



Mi < '..hill: 
Willi li 1 I 

"Mu-. 
Mr. Burgess, who certainly ougbl to know. rhomai 
v.as the author. If 1 am not mistaken.'' 

"Oh. no," saiil the architect There was decision in hia 
tone. 1 do not like to dispute with a literary man, but l 
think that I have read the book often enough to know 
wrote It." 

And .<■> the debate went on for some time, and llki 
tea nobody seemed to gain the least conviction 
tier's argument. 

"Well, let's leave it to arbitration," said Mr. Burgess at 
We'll call the waiter and let him decide 1" 

The waiter was accordingly called. He was a low-browed 
specimen with a barber's twist on his hair and the blank 
expression necessary to the profession. 
. "Who wiote 'Diana of the Crossways?' " asked Mr. 
C'ahill. 

"George Meredith," said the flunkey, as promptly as 
though he had been asked to give the bill of fare. 

The fact that both were wrong flashed upon them in an 
instant, for George Meredith did write "Diana of the Cross- 
ways." 

.Moral: Since Mr. Alonzo Sosso has climbed the steeps of 
Olympus bearing a pile of platters, the waiters are begin- 
ning to read up. 

* * * 

During the opera season I had in this column the story 
of a withering rebuke Madam Gadski gave a prominent belle 
at a dinner while here because the young lady innocently 
remarked that she had seen the prima donna at the opera 
with her grown daughter. Frau Gadski declared herself to 
be but twenty-nine. Now, from New York I hear that the 
San Francisco girl was right. The young lady was Frau- 
Uin Gadski, but she is to exist sub-rosa away from the eyes 
and ears of the public — for salaries go crown when the 
audiences realize that birds of song are growing old. 

* * * 

Signor Enrici Grau, the Peruvian Consul, is not only de- 
scended from the Spanish kings, but he is extremely proud 
of it. Sig. Grau is a charming man, but that is his weakness. 

For companions he usually endeavors to find men of nis 
own rank. General Seamans, who died in Washington, 
looked quite as royal as Mr. Grau is. It was a habit of the 
General's to wear all the medals he had received for shoot- 
ing, and a stranger looking at him would imagine him a 
potentate of high degree. 

Not long ago at a reception, friends of Mr. Grau observed 
General Seamans across the hall. Said one to the Consul of 
Peru: 

"Enrici, do you see that tall, distinguished looking gen- 
tleman over there?" 

The Consul cast a glance at the Adjutant-General. 

"Well," went on the jester, "he is the only Duke in Amer- 
ica, and strangely enough he is in business here in San 
Francisco." 

Immediately the Peruvian was interested. 

"One can see it by look that he is a patrician," observed 
the Consul. 

Then Mr. Grau's friend told a long romance of one of the 
French Dukes who was exiled during the early days of the 
French republic. This gentleman's descendants came to 
San Francisco, and the man opposite was the head of 
the great but impoverished family. 

Presently Mr. Grau, realizing that at last he had met 
some one of his own rank, asked to be presented to the 
General, and the jester left them alone. Mr. Grau began 
conversation something as follows: 

"I have been deeply touched to learn of the misfortunes 
of your house, sir." 

The General looked at the Consul in mute surprise, and 
ventured merely an interrogative: 

"Yes?" 

"I have always had the greatest admiration for the great 
heroes of your race." 

The General had not the slightest doubt that the Consul 
had the most agreeable intentions, but he feared he was a 
lunatic. He was positive of it when Mr. Grau explained to 



him wh> he bin 

king of s, 

of the 1 1 
of on] am ■ 

. the Hen. ral asked: 
• Whom do you 
"The link,' of Blank, the only Duke In America," ans- 

Tou have l a misinform) neral. "My 

mis have been Americans for two hundred years, and 
none of na ever spoke French." 

Then the Consul realized that he had been the victim of 
a joke, but he was silent. 

• * • 

Tin- new Princess David of Honolulu is a handsome young 
woman with a decided Hawaiian appearance. During the 
opera season she, with some relatives, was often at the vari- 
ous performances, but for some reason the society re- 
porters missed her, although her gowns were marvels of 
French art. Like many people who wish to avoid inaccura- 
i ies, she or the Prince David sent to one of the dailies a 
description of the frocks of the ladies in her party. The 
writer was not content with merely a description of the 
apparel of the others, but when she came to the Princess- 
to-be, she was described as a "handsome brunette." So she 
is. but a very pronounced brunette. 



Pure Cow's Milk, 
made sterile and guarded against contamination, from be- 
ginning to baby's bottle, is the perfection of substitute fee 1- 
ing for infants. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk has 
stood first among infant foods for more than forty years. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



This man is fav- 
ored with two of 
the greatest bles- 
sings that can be 
bestowed — one 
on the seat be- 
side him, the 
other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

MARKET and TENTH STS. 




StudebaKer, 



Rjumeo-t 



CHAMPAGNE 



RUINART pete et fife, RHEIMS, France 
Established in J 729 

HUBERT BROS., 21321s market street 



AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Fhelan Bldg.Tel Main 5387 San Francisco, Gal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




ocietv 



WM^WBg 




What a lot of tired young maidens there will be to-mor- 
row. And yet, is the debutante ever tired, or at least does 
she ever confess to that impeachment? However that 
may be, there are plenty of others who do not hesitate to 
say that the week's festivities have been just a trifle ex- 
hausting. To begin with, there was Mrs. Dean's "at home" 
at the Palace Hotel on Monday, Mrs. Thos. Magee, Jr., an. I 
Mrs. Whittell also receiving their friends that day. Mrs. 
George Wells and Miss Marie were at home on Tuesday, 
and Mrs. Lester gave a tea on Wednesday. The army dance 
this week was transferred from the Presidio to Angel 
Island, where on Tuesday evening a large party of city 
folk enjoyed the hop given by the officers stationed at that 
post, the McDowell making a special trip for their convey- 
ance over and home again. At the ball at the Palace on 
Wednesday evening the dancing was done to help replenish 
the coffers of the Bishop Armitage Orphanage, the plans 
laid for that purpose during the summer at Blingum having 
been so unhappily interfered with. There were a number of 
dinners prior to the dance, Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. Taylor. 
Mrs. Austin Tubbs and Mrs. Frank being among the givers 
of them. On Thursday evening the McNear dinner-dance 
of which the charming bride-elect, Miss Georgie Hopkins, 
was the motif, was one of the most delightful affairs imagin- 
able, and prolonged until a very late hour, at least the fan- 
tastic toe tripping part of it was. Last night La Jeunesse 
Club had its second meeting, which was not a whit less de- 
lightful than the first, and to-day just scan the list of what 
society is expected to go through, for this is to be another 
"tea" day, and the question is, can they all be accomplished 
by any one person, and if so, how many minutes can be al- 
lowed to each of them. The hostesses this afternoon are 
Mrs. George Gibbs, whose tea is for her neice. Miss Mabel 
Kane, who is spending the winter with her; Mrs. Henry T. 
Scott, who gives her tea as an adieu to her daughter, Mrs. 
Walter Martin; the Misses Mills, where the Misses Hunting- 
ton will appear as chief guests. Mrs. Julian Sonntagg is 
fourth in the line of tea givers to-day, and Miss Kate Brig- 
ham will be guest of honor at the tea to be given by Mrs. 
Brlce and Miss Gertrude Goewey. Then, as if this were not 
enough for one twenty-four hours, to-night Mr. James Phelan 
will be the host of a dance at the Palace Hotel, which will 
enable Mrs. Walter Martin to bid adieu to all her friends in 
her own especial "set." 

Luckily there will be to-morrow for rest, as no very impor- 
tant Sunday teas have been announced. Among next week's 
affairs will be the numerous at homes for which cards are 
out, including that of Mrs. and Miss Nichols on Tuesday. 
Miss Charlotte Ellinwood gives a luncheon in honor of Miss 
Scott on Wednesday, and Mrs. Adam Grant's tea takes place 
that afternoon; Mrs. E. B. Pond's second luncheon is on 
the cards for Friday, and Miss Bessie Huntington will be 
among Saturday's tea hostesses. The two most prominent 
dances of next week will be the Greenway ball on Thursday 
and the meeting of the Friday Fortnightlies the next night, 
when the second of the Schwabacker's dinner dances, at 
which Miss Jacie Schwabacker is the central figure, also 
t.tkes place. But there will be little if any let up the follow- 
ing week in the gay doings of the swim. Mrs. Kittle has 
received hearty welcome on her return to the fold as hostess, 
and her invitations to the dance she purposes giving on Tues- 
day evening have met with hardly a regret. Her neice. Miss 
Cornelia Scott, for whom the party is given, and who has 
become such a favorite during her visit to California, is 
on the eve of departure for her Eastern home. On Thurs- 
day evening Cotillion Hall will be the scene of the ball 
which Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Huntington are to give for the 
debut of their daughter, Miss Edith, and it has been ar- 
ranged for that date for so many weeks that it can scarcely 
be realized that it is almost here at last. An event of the 
following week will be the bal poudre at Cotillion Hall, to be 



given by a number of young ladies, which includes the 
Misses Brigham, who have inspired the idea, the Misses 
Harrington, Smith, Foster, Borel, Cooper, McClung, Allen, 
Coflin, Eells and Nuttall, and Wednesday evening, the 29th, 
is the date named for it to take place. 

Mrs. A. M. Simpson and Miss Edith will be at home on the 
21th and again on the 31st. 

The at homes given by Mrs. Will Taylor and Miss Georgie 
Hopkins, by Mrs. Jo Crockett and her daughter, Mrs. Laur- 
ence Scott, Mrs. H. E. Huntington, Mrs. Herrin and Mrs. 
Kittle, last Friday afternoon, were but the prelude to the 
evening's festivities, there being a rush to change gowns 
and be in time for the delightful vaudeville performance 
at the McCutcheon's, where one novelty after another fol- 
lowed each other in most bewildering variety. After that 
some of the guests took in the dance of the Friday Fort- 
r.igutlies at Cotillion Hall, where Miss Genevieve King made 
her debut. This party somewhat suffered in consequence 
of the other, so many preferring to remain and dance at the 
McCutcheon's, and those who did show up came late. 

Mrs. Adolph Roos, who is such an accomplished hostess 
that her absence in that role has been much regretted this 
season, gave the first of a series of entertainments in the 
form of a tea on Tuesday afternoon, which was very elabo- 
rate. It is said that Mrs. Roos meditates that recent fad, 
a progressive dinner and later a fancy dress ball before 
the end of the season, all of which her friends hope may 
not be merely rumor. 

The ladies of the Century Club are up to their eyes in 
preparations for the "afternoon" the last week of this month, 
when the minuet is to be danced by members of the club 
in costume, among whom will be Mrs. Jonn F. Swift, and 
v. hat a superb picture she will be in old Colonial dress. The 
hard part of it is that there will be no outside guests in- 
vited, the company to be restricted to Century Club members 
only. 

The whisper of the little bird to the effect that the Misses 
Spreckels have a real bal masque under contemplation has 
been hailed with enthusiastic delight by buds and belles 
alike. 

There are always two sides to every question, and the 
one under discussion has been the date for the Colonial ball, 
which has finally been named as the third of April. One 
side was that experience has proved that post-Lenten func- 
tions are seldom successes, for by that time many of the 
swim are out of the rut, so to speak, of parties, and as it 
will then be spring time they will have betaken themselves 
to their country homes. The other side was that with such 
a surfeit of dancing before Lent that the ball will come as 
a greater novelty after that long rest, during which there 
will be plenty of time for the preparation of costumes. In 
view of so much dancing the Chrysanthemums have wisely 
decided on giving a vaudeville show instead of the custom- 
ary ball in aid of the bed which they support at the Chil- 
dren's Hospital. All the details have not yet been settled, 
and it is to take place within the nest three weeks. 

We have had two of what may be called Hawaiian wed- 
dings of late, the participants all hailing from that erst- 
while Island kingdom. The first one was between Mrs. 
James Campbell and Mr. Samuel Parker, and took place 
last Friday evening; the second was the marriage of the 
first bride's daughter, Miss Abbie Campbell and Prince 
David Kawananakoa, which was solemnized on Tuesday at 
the Occidental, followed by a bridal dejeuner and the depart- 
ure of both couples for Washington, D. C. 

The engagement of Miss Carmen Mooie to Mr. Walter 
Starr was announced at a tea given by Mrs. A. A. Moore at 
her home in East Oakland last week. Another engagement 
announced on Monday last was between Miss Laura Denson 
and Mr. George N. Mott, Jr., of Sacramento, where the 
young couple will reside after their marriage in February. 
The engagement of Miss Edith McBean and Dr. Kierstadt. 
alter so many denials, Is at last an acknowledged fact. 

It has been rather cold in town this week, but down at the 
Hotel del Monte the weather has been beautifully warm 
and clear, making the guests forget that the winter season 
is on. 



January 11. 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



•IS \ .ill., i- Ured from 
military iluty last week. has. aecomponlad by V 
li-af, twin paying n \. Iciin. th.-y will g 

permanent home in Bsrkelej where Col. and Mrs Miller 
have also taken up their abode. Mrs. Darling's flail 
will be only a brief one on business, she having ( 
house at New London, where the family will pa 
months. 

Miss Cora Smedburg, who only remained to take hi 
In the programme at the McCutcheon performance, left for 
tbe East last Sunday, and will be lost to us for thi 
of the season. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin leave tomorrow 
on their long-deferred trip abroad, and do not anticipate 
ling for some time; they will pay visits in New York 
Uld Washington before sailing for Europe. Miss Florence 
Dunham also leaves for the East to-morrow. Mrs. Low an. I 
Miss Flora have taken up what almost promises to be their 
permanent residence at Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. Stirling 
Postley are visiting Mrs. H. N. Cook at Belvedere. 

Mrs. Jack rle Rhyter and Miss Ada Sullivan have arrived 
in safety the other side of the Atlantic, where they will 
remain several weeks. 

Miss Rowena Burns' luncheon to-rlay at her home in Octa- 
via street, is given in honor of Miss Maud Cluff, who leaves 
next Wednesday for several weeks' visit in the East. Mrs. 
George Martin also gives a luncheon to-day in the Palace 
Grill. The ball to be given by the Alumni Officers of the 
State University will take place at Golden Gate Hall on 
Thursday evening, January 24th. 

The delightful weather at the Hotel Rafael is attracting 
many guests. Among the recent arrivals are the following: 
Lieutenant H. L. Roosevelt, Mr. and Mrs. H. Levy, Mr. C. 
Wendell, Mr. A. A. Botkin, Mr. W. S. Lyon, Mr. C. L. Gage, 
Mr. E. G. McBaine, Mr. L. M. Starr, Mr. C. D. Starr, Mrs. J. 
H. Fritch, Mrs. J. M. Litchfield, Mr. H. L. Cook, Mrs. Arthur 
Brander, Mr. S. W. Forman, Mr. Monfroyd Sharpe, Mr. 
John Brock, Mrs. Z. J. Hatch, Miss Adeline Hatch. 
~ The Orientals will receive at Golden Gate Hall, 625 Sutter 
street, Tuesday evening, January 21st. 

Mrs. A. P. Hotaling, accompanied by her son Frederick, 
returned home last week, after four months' absence in New 
York. 



MONEY BACK 



The favor that the President suspenders has met with is 
a great tribute to its superiority. It is a marvel of con- 
struction, simple and durable, and the most comfortable 
suspender ever made. Its unbreakable ends are an improve- 
ment that will be much appreciated. All the metal trim- 
mings are non-rustable. The President suspender gives 
absolute comfort and perfect freedom of movement under 
all conditions. 



The San Francisco Chronicle's New Year number is al- 
ways awaited with interest, and this year it is better than 
ever. It is crammed full of all sorts of interesting matter 
regarding the resources of the State, presented in the most 
attractive form. A large portion of it is printed in colors, 
this part of the work being most artistic. 



Pictures and Frames. 

We have received during December over one hundred 
patterns of entirely new things in mouldings, which we have 
not had time to open until now. The Beauty, Originality , 
and Moderate Prices of these mouldings will please every 
one having pictures to frame. On sale after this date. San- 
born, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



rOmey & Goetting, stalls 33-34-45-46 California Market, 

always keep on hand the best and freshest of fruits and 
vegetables in season. They have only the best to be pro- 
cured. 



You will always be safe in calling for Mumm's Cham- 
pagne. It is known everywhere as the very best, is used at 
all the great banquets, and has the largest sales. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

Physicians would not recommend Jesse Moore Whiskey it 

they did not know It to be the best in the market. 




From $3.75 Up. 



Barler's 
Odorless 
OIL 
HEATERS 

are not found perfectly satisfactory 

Guaranteed not to Smoke or Smell. 

No Chimneys to Break. 

Made in Nine Sizes, from $3.75 Up. 

There are over 14,000 BarlerOil Heaters in 
line in San Francisco, more than all other 
oil stoves combined. There must be a 
reason for it. Think it over. 

Call and see them in operation, or send 
for descriptive booklet. 



Chas. Brown & Son 

807 Market Street, 

Flood Building, - - Near Fourth. 



RAGING! 

EVERY WEEK DAY, RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp. 

Ferryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1, 1:30. 2:30 and 3 P. m., 
connecting: with trains stopping - at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferry ickets to Shell Mound. Lost two cars on train reserved for ladies 
and their escorts, No smoking-. All trains via Oakland Mole connect with 
San I'ablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadway. Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue electric cava at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric cai-s g;o direct to the 
track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning-— Trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 p. in, and immediately 
after the last race. 

THOMAS H, WILLIAMS, Jr., President. 

R. B. MELROY. Secretary. 





Judge W. M. le Poer Trench, touring through Vancouver 
Island in a No. 2 Locomobile. 
Model to be seen at The Salesroom of the Locomobile Co. of the Pacific 
1622 to 1628 Market St. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




While the Solons now engaged 
Six Cents per Thousand in the manufacture of gas in 
Cubic Feet. San Francisco are cutting the 

throats of one another to the 
loss and injury of every person unfortunate enough to be 
connected with them in the business, a cloud has arisen upon 
the financial horizon, invisible to them of course, from 
which before long may be precipitated a deluge which will 
swamp them. In other parts of the world scientists have 
been and are now at work in an effort to reduce the cost 
of manufacturing gas, and in one case at least the cost has 
already been reduced to a figure which will possibly sur- 
prise people here who fancy that there is nothing in this 
particular industry left for them to learn. It may interest 
them to know that a company has just been brought out in 
England, with a capital of $5,000,000 under a special act of 
Parliament (Edward VII., Chapter cexli) to erect works for 
the manufacture of a gas which is to be utilized for power 
and heating only at as low as 2d per 1000 cubic feet. The 
act authorizing this company to charge 4d per 1000 cubic 
feet up to a consumption of 4,000,000 cubic feet per quarter 
and 3d per 1000 cubic feet for larger consumers. Tho 
company, however, is figuring on a plant which will be cap- 
able of producing 25,000,000,000 cubic feet for 300 days out 
of the year, which they will dispose of as low as 2d per thou- 
sand cubic feet. All of this product will be devoted to the 
supply of fuel and heat to the manufacturing towns within 
a large area, effecting a large saving in coal, which is now 
used entirely. The company will not enter the illuminating 
held at all, and this is especially provided for in the act 
mentioned. This is the first of the cheap gas producers 
to make its appearance before the public, but it is under- 
stood that there are others ready to start in competition, 
one of which is prepared to manufacture illuminating gas 
at 12 cents per thousand feet. They are already using gas 
made by the company now floated for driving engines 
coupled to dynamos for the production of electricity. By 
the process of manufacture about four times the amount of 
sulphate of ammonia is obtained as in ordinary gas making. 
The introduction of such economic methods in this quarter 
o( the globe, if practicable, ami there is no reason why not, 
Mould knock the more antiquated institutions silly for a time 
at least. 

The passing of the control of the 
The North Shore North Pacific Coast Railroad, with 
Railroad Company, its promise of improvements over 

the whole system, is viewed with 
i-, tense satisfaction by the traveling public. The new man- 
agement lias organized with Mr. John Martin, President; 
Mr. R. R. Colgate, Vice-President, and Mr. J. C. Coleman, 
Mr. A. Borel, Mr. C. de Guigne, and Mr. A. H. Small, Direct- 
ors. The name of incorporation is the North Shore Rail- 
road Company, with a capital of $6,000,000. President Mar- 
tin has already intimated that a policy will be pursued which 
will make the road popular. The roadway will be improved 
and a third rail will be laid so that both broad and narrow 
guage cars can be run, a heavier class of rail being laid 
than those now in place. New rolling stock lias been ordered 
including electric cars for service between Sausalito and 
San Rafael. It is expected that when the new system is in 
working order the time will be reduced between this city 
and San Rafael to a degree which will attract a large influx 
of residents to points along the line, and be the means of 
building up the county materially. The new management 
is made up of men of modern ideas, who are after business 
and disposed in every reasonable way to cater to the re- 
quirements of their patrons, which is more than could be 
said of the retiring officials, who were, in consequence, 
anything but popular with commuters. Mr. George H. Fair- 
child, at one time with the Market-street Railroad, and until 
recently with the Nevada County Railroad, has been ap- 
pointed manager of the North Shore Company. 



It may not be generally known. 
South African Mines while true nevertheless, that the 
Starting up Again. bulk of gold, amounting to a round 

number of millions sterling, com- 
mandeered by the Boer leaders when they closed down the 
Kandt mines, has been recovered by the British authorities 
from various depositaries since Johannesburg has been 
occupied. The mines themselves are now opening up again 
one by one, and work in the deep levels is proceeding as if 
nothing had ever happened. The financial world from now 
on will feel the reviving stimulus of a South African gold 
supply, which formed such an important factor in the market 
lief ore the unfortunate disturbance took place. American 
r.iakers of mining machinery will now doubtless profit by 
the requirements of the British companies, which suffered 
during the late war. The Empire may get roundly damned 
throughout the United States until eternity's bells ring out. 
on general principles, but there is nothing the matter with 
its coin. It's all right, you bet! 

There have been several little 
The Pine-St. Market, spurts in the market during the 
past week. Caledonia and Over- 
man took the up grade for awhile, as if they meant it, but 
sobered down eventually at a lower range of prices. More 
important work looking toward the exploitation of some 
good ground is given as the reason for the unexpected 
movement in these stocks, which are now in favor with 
some dealers as money makers. Another class pick out 
Potosi as a hummer on account of the drilling about to be- 
gin on the Brunswick property, owned by this company. 
This work ought to begin early next week, and as the drill 
goes down speculation should grow more active, if there 
is any left on the street. The north-ends have held firm 
during the week, but this is all that can be said. There 
has been no particular movement in any of the shares, 
and offerings have been few and far between. This being 
:i year of electrical possibilities in Nevada, it is more than 
likely that the market will be sustained more or less, or 
or in any event the south-end shares. More men find em- 
ployment at such seasons in order to keep up the crop of 
voters, and San Francisco, as usual, will help out. 

This has been an uneventful week on the 
The Local local Stock and Bond Exchange, and 

Stock Market, while business has been fairly active, 
there has been nothing to give the mar- 
ket any character. Gas and Electric, after dipping below 
40, worked back there with light transactions, and in other 
directions prices of stocks ruled steady under a moderate 
demand. Choice bonds continue in good request, and a num- 
ber of sales have been reported daily. A number of inter- 
esting annual meetings will be held during the current 
month, among them Gas and Electric, and Alaska Packers. 
The reports from both of these companies will be awaited 
with much interest. The election of a new board of direc- 
tors in the former has already been forecast, and it is now 
morally certain that the moving spirit in control will be the 
Spreckels faction for good or ill as the stockholders may 
view it individually. 

This mine is now being actively 

St. John Consolidated worked. The boarding house is 
Quicksilver Mine. being enlarged to accommodate 
an increased force of men. Cast- 
ings have been ordered for the repair of the furnaces, and 
the main tunnel is being pushed ahead with three shafts 
tc undercut the Jackson shoot. The shaft is being parti- 
tioned and lined preparatory to making another lift and 
opening up the 230-foot level in order to under-cut the 
raain tunnel shoot, and the San Miguel shoot of ore. The 
latter shoot is 14 feet wide. A winze is being sunk in the 
bottom of it, samples of which were received at the office 
cf the company, 306 Pine street, on Wednesday. Some of the 
richest ore ever discovered in California is now on exhi- 
The acts of generosity of Eastern men 

A Banker and a to their employes, reported from time 

Philanthropist. to time, appear strange to people in the 
Pacific metropolis, where the motto 
that "a lean hound runs the fastest," the inspired remark of 
a millionaire since departed to his reward, whatever that 
may be, is still in vogue. Following upon the Carnegie 
bounty to his workmen in the form of an opportunity to pur- 



January 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



shares in the plant at low rate nn<l oil 
and the J. P. Morgan lavish gifts to I 
of how Mr. Charles \V. M 
tioanl Unnk of New Amsterdam made money for his Bi 

When he took charge of the bank hr advised them 
t" buy the stock, offering to take their notes. Tiny did, 

■ for It. It has since doubled up. being now 
11400, enabling them to pay tbelr notes and clear 10 
ii the transaction. This bank has just paid 10 
cent in dividends during the past twelve months. A 
can truthfully boast of princes of her own. even it i! 
not wear the coronet. 

At the annua] meeting of thi 
Spring Valley holders of the Spring Valley Water 
Annual Meeting. Company two important reports 

read — one by President Howard, show- 
ing the prosperous condition of the company, and another 
by Engineer Schussler. which contained the pleasing state- 
i icnt that with the extension of the company's plant now 
pilder way. the city will have for all future times an 
abundance of water for all requirements. The stockholders 
re-elected the old board of directors, which consists of 
Mr. Charles Webb Howard. Mr. A. h. Payson. Mr. Thomas 
II. Brown. Mr. Homer S. King, Mr. Frank Simms, Mr. A. 
Uorel and Mr. Samuel Bigelow. 

The Oopperbelt Railway and Power 
A New Railroad in Company has been incorporated 
Shasta County. with Mr. Louis Auerbach, Mr. 
Thomas E. Ryan, Mr. C. P. Deering, 
Mr. John Ough, and Mr. F. H. Powers as Directors. Mr. 
Lewis Auerbach represents Lawson, the millionaire copper 
man of Boston, who is associated in the new enterprise with 
Captain H. J. De la Mar. The attorneys for the corpora- 
tion are Heller & Powers. The railroad will connect the 
Trinity and Bully Hill Copper Mines. 

Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from Decem- 
ber 31st to January 6th: 



STOCKS. 


SHARES 
SOLD 

loo $ 


RANGE OF 
PRICES 

25 @ •• 

29 ® 35 

50 @ F3 
3 40 @ 3 50 

20 @ 21 
5 2 1 @ 5 S7K 

3 ® 4 

35 @ 

7 ® ■■ 
7 00 @ 7 50 

20 ® 

7 ® 8 
1 15 @ 1 25 

21 @ 52 
1 65 @ . . 

5 00 @ 5 37>4 
18 ® 


GROSS 

8AI.ES 

2) 




8 214 






5,740 
4.(33 






13! 

1.232 

19 

315 


Thirty Three 


200 


70 

1.449 

40 




1,950 


140 


Stpr'i a 




4.5 


Monarch of Arizona 


3,500 

2,500 

86,570 


751 

330 

1 990 

450 

525,391 



At a regular meeting of the board of directors of the San 
Francisco National Bank, held on the 4th day of December, 
1901, a dividend for the six months ending December 31, 
1901, of 3 per cent upon its capital stock was declared, pay- 
able January 10, 1902. Yours respectfully, 

JAMES K. WILSON, President. 



Stops the Cough and Works Off the Cold. 
Laxative Bromo-Quinine Tablets cure a cold in one day. No Cure, No Pay 
Price 25 cents. 



The year '93 was known among wine men as one of 

the best vintage years in their memories; yet Doyen Cham- 
pagne, 93, sells for the price of ordinary champagne. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 610 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country. Tel. Main 1042. 

Southfield Wellington Coal 
recommended by the best dialers. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty, " Colton Gas" for painless teeth extracting 



Lonoh and dinner, 50 cents, at Felix's Rotlsserle. 537 California street, be 
ov Kearny: Sunday dinner, 75c. Best French restaurant in town 

' Ahercian Dispensary, 514 Pine street, above Kearney. 



When the bar-keep sets out Jesse Moore ' AA, 

customer the best in the house. 



he gives the 



1 i> llAMOl 

til Ktm>. 1st, 
Vtre-l'ro-liletil I 



I A .1 Ml Cons, 3„. 

i i, nL "I 



Tly ol 

PsrksAlaori 'vinrliTui (Mr 



HARRON, RICHARD & McCONE 



21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

Hiriing riachinery 

Mill. 



and 
Supplies 



Huntington Centrifugal Roller 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

C. F. MATTHEWS, D.D.S.. Manager 

MATTHEW5- DENTAL CO. 

SPECIALTY: CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 
128 Powell Street. 

Phone Red 2714 San Francisco 

THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Oal. 

Telephone. Main 389. 



Paper 



J. C. Zellerbaoh 



A. Zellerbaoh 



A. ZELLERBACH 
& SONS 

4J6tO 426 SatlSOme Street, N. E. Cor. Commercial 

4J9 to 423 Clay Street 

418 and 420 Commercial Street 



TEL MAIN 113. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Gray Bros. 



228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
205 New Hlerh Street, Los Angeles. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



'I've prescribed 
enough ... 

—Dr. Shhadt, 274 Lexington avenue. New Yorfc 

L. CAHErs & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 

Send for Pamphlet. 418 Saeramento Street. 

CRYSTAL PALACE 



CHOICE WINES AND' LIQUORS 
COMMERCIAL LUNCH A SPECIALTY 



_5 Hearnu Street 
12 Geary Street 



, Df UTCH, Prop 



C-PAPf F Books. Photoqrabhs, etc. Catalogue, with samples, 81.00 
aV/AKl/E Sealed letter post. 0. ABTIWR, 6 RucTf cluse, Paris. 

From Thomas', London 

MANUFACTURER OF 




Fine Shoes 

Near Waldorf-Astoria. 6n W EST 34TH ST. 

Between 5th Ave, and Broadway. New York. 

fiumboldt Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET. 

Directors— Adolph C. Weber, President; W.J. Lowry, Vice-President; 
W. S. Keyes; I. Kohn; G. H. Luchsineer. 
A D. Keyes and C. E. Hatch, attorneys; Ernest Brand, Seoretary. 



HEMS 



Business College 

4 POST STREET 
Illustrated Catalogue Free. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




«^i^ : l"F:Uj 



nsurance 




The Mutual Reserve Fund fake has 
Sues for Libel, sued a publication for criminal libel. 

Now, why does it not sue the Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of Maryland for libel? The afore- 
said Insurance Commissioner, in 'a way not by any means 
delicate, just fired the Reserve Fund from his State, and says 
in part as follows in his notice: "For many months past 
this department -has been receiving numerous complaints 
and inquiries as to the way and manner of your conducting 
business. Some of these complaints we have investigated 
thoroughly, and the facts, either admitted on your part or 
proved on the part of the complainants, show such a state 
of affairs as renders it absolutely necessary, if we desire to 
protect the interest of policyholders and would-be policy- 
holders in this State, that I notify you of my intention to 
refuse to issue a license to your company to do business in 
this State for the next year unless your action in laying 
liens against the old policy-holders shall be reversed." The 
Commissioner then goes further and does not mince either 
his manner or his language: "You have a number of old 
policyholders who have been paying their money into your 
treasury for some twenty years, and row, when they are too 
old to secure insurance anywhere else, you jump their 
assessments to nearly six times what they were originally, 
and, in addition to that, levy additional assessments and lay 
a lien on their policies of nearly one-half its face value. 
This action upon your part has had the effect of forcing out 
your old policyholders, who find themselves unable in their 
old age to bear such heavy burdens. The money they have 
paid in, with the idea that they were protecting their famil- 
ies and laying by something that would help them in the 
event of death, is thus swept away and lost to them forever." 
He then reviews the report of the Insurance Department of 
New York, made after an examination of the Mutual Re- 
serve. He says: "The report of the New York Department 
is anything but a compliment," and follows this by a volun- 
tary statement: "I did not order an examination of the 
company because there were sufficient facts admitted to 
be true to justify me in refusing to renew your license." 
It seems that here is a chance for the Reserve Fund to do 
something, and win, if not a decent, clean bill of health in 
Maryland, at least a chance to keep on doing business. 
The Reserve Fund will not do it. It failed to take action 
against the Insurance Commissioner of California's action, 
and it will not take any against Maryland's Commissioner. 
It is well to note anyway that the action against the pub- 
lication referred to is only criminal and not civil. 



acknowledged frauds will carry "insurance" below the regu- 
lar rate. It is hardly just to call such a year as the Coast 
has had from a fire underwriters point of view a "good 
tiling," but it is equally sure and true that bunco sharps and 
three shell men haunt the country where "the good things" 
are. The Insurance Department of California will not 
recognize or license any of the "companies for export trade 
enly," and if the public are beaten it is the public's fault. 
Insurance that insures is worth its market value, and any 
company or association offering to do the business at less 
than cost will not alone do business, but "do" the fool 
buyer. 

* • * 

The Insurance Commissioner of Washington admits he 
is overworked. He says that all the insurance "concerns" 
are seeking admission to Washington. It is presumed that 
under the nomenclature of "concern" he refers to the twenty 
odd fraternal co-operative schemes which he admits to do 
business in his bailiwick. 

* * * 

There are some notably small loss ratios accompanied by 
a fair average of business, but the News Letter prefers to 
give the accurate sworn figures later rather than talk of 
twenty-eight to thirty per cent now. 

* * * 

Mr. Rolla V. Watt is re-appointed for another term as 
Fire Insurance Commissioner. 

* * * 

The Union Central paid among others a $10,000 death 
claim in San Francisco in December. 

* * * 

The Christmas number of the Insurance Sun is a credit- 
able effort. 

* * * 

The Fire Association has placed Mr. Crawford in charge 
(.1 California and Nevada as special agent. 

* * * 

Mr. W. D. Madigan has connected himself with the Wash- 
ington Life in this State. 

* • * 

The Home Fire of New York has entered Canada. 



Burning Wood and Leather 
with our new pyrography machines is an artistic pleasure 
that any one can enjoy at small expense. Colored skins 
and all kinds of Wooden Articles for burning, as well as 
designs to work from, at Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market 
street. 



You always meet nice people at Zinkand's, which is 

society's favorite resort. It is a scene of gaiety and anima- 
tion after the theatre. A fine orchestra plays there every 
evening. 



For home use. for bar use. for physician's use. for every- 
body's use. Jesse Moore Whiskey Is always the oest and Is in 
most general demand. 



Acknowledgments are made and thanks given for the 
artistic calendars of the German of Freeport, Aachen- 
Munich, Equitable Life, Fidelity of Philadelphia, Phenix, 
Mutual Life, and for tape measure from the Home Fire 
and Marine, eraser of silver from Fireman's Fund, desk 
diary from the Home Fire, and for other advertising mater- 
ial from other companies. 

* * * 

The close of the year seemed fatal for wood working 
establishment fires from Tacoma to the Middle States. It 
looks as if there had been a fever in the air to liquidate 
some of these institutions at the expense of the companies. 

* * • 

The News Letter prophesied some weeks ago that an on- 
slaught would be made on California business by the smaller 
companies. It now seems that a forty per cent loss ratio 
is not tempting alone to that class of companies who "pike" 
or follow bushwhacker-like a good year in any territory, hut 
it is learned that the Lloyds and Mutuals are going to try 
the usual practices followed by wild catters. Circulars have 
come to hand during the past week from all kinds of 
"felines" from the Western of Aurora up to a semi-decent 
county mutual offering figures that these kindergartners or 



If you will watch the Sun- 
day papers for our special 
sales each week of drugs, 
medicines, toilet articles, 
you can save considerably 
over our regular cut rates. 
Telephone orders delivered 
at once. South 356. 

K6c Owl Drug Co. 

1128 MARKET ST., S. F. 
BROADWAY i. 10TH ST., OAKLAN D. 



January 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



18 



A VERY BAD MIX-UP. 



All of young Haakins' troublts came from trying 
> devoted court tci two young ladir- 
Mm a cravat order on a fashionable haberdas 
•mas. and he lost no turn In changing them ini 
He also told each young lady thai und< r do clrcunf 
mid ho wear any other cravat than the one she 
had given him. And they both believed him, in a way that 
confiding girls have. 

It happened that the other afternoon one of these youag 
ladles gave an afternoon reception, to which young HaskinS 
was Invited. While dressing he looked over his stock ot 
Cravats that he had on hand. There were tics from sis- 
ters and cousins and aunts, from his prospective hostess and 
from the other young lady. He tried hard to pick out the 
one that the former had given him. At last he found it, 
donned it, and hied away to the reception. 
He met the other young lady there. 



Business and club-men have found that Fay & Fos- 
ter of the Grand Hotel Cafe, are putting up the best commer- 
cial lunch in town. It is served daily from 11 to 2, and is 
of a qualUy that suits everybody. 



When you get ready for spring house-cleaning don't 

make the mistake of having your carpets beaten with a 
club. You will find it far easier and cheaper to send them 
to Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, 
where they are thoroughly cleaned and returned looking like 
new. Goods called for and delivered. 



The name is a guaranty of its purity— Jesse Moore Whiskey 

is always right. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMAN8 FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 



LNSUBANOE COMPANY (Limited) 



OP LONDON. ENGLAND 



C. P- MTJLLrNS, Manaeer, 416-41S California street. S. P. 
FIRE INSURANCE 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OP HABTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Oa»h Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manaeer 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Pranolsco aeent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(limited) OP LTVEBPOOL 

OiriTiL (6.700,000 

BAXFOTJR. GUTHRIE A CO., Aeents 316 California street, S. P 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of EBFTJBT, GERMANY 
Capital, 12,260.000 Assets. 110,984,243 

VOSS, CONBAD & CO., General Manaee 

Paolflo Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome .treet S. P. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg:, Germany 
N. Schleaalnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery BL, 8. T. 




INSURANCE. 



INS RAICG COMPANY 




O.T FRKKPORT 



G. M.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sar. Francisco. Cal 
Phone. Main 6601. 



Founded A. t>. 1792 

Insurance Uompany of / lorth firmer 



ica 



OF PHILADELPHIA. PKITIf. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Aeent, 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 



Capital Paid Up, t3.446.100 

Surplus to Policy Holders, ts. 930 .431.41. 



Assets. t24.662.043.35 
Losses Paid Over. Jl84.O00.O0O.00 



PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manaeer 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Manaeers. 
FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

op New Zealand 
Capital, 16,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company 'e bulldlne. 812 California street 

W". P. THOMAS, Manaeer 
Hookee A Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Aeents 



413 California street. S. P. 



Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manaeer 
219 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fire, Llebtnine. and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, 83.000,000 Gross Assets, $13,687,833 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $7,631,926 
H, L. Roff, General Aeent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of 
General and Special Agents r- sident in the Pacific Coant States, ensur- 
ing: prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the 
insuring public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and 
Payment of Lo sses _^ 

THE AMERICAN GREDIT- 

INDEMNITY GO. of new york 

9. M. PHELAN, President. 
CREDIT INSURANCE ONLY 

The Leadlne Meroantl'e Houses of the United States 
■ endorse this system. 

Correspondence Solicited. A business producer and profit protector. 
GEORGE J. STERNSDORFF. 211 SANSOME STREET 

PaciBo Coast Aeent Tel. Blaok 4434 SAN FRANCISCO 



WE 

PAY YOUR 

losses ■ 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 
Assets over $62,000,000. Liabilities 853,01)0.000, Surplus over $8,000,000 

Issues policies for all approved forms of insurance; adapted to all stations 
and circumstances of life. Policies are free from restriction" as to travel 
and residence; are clear, oonolse business contracts, and conditions are 
plain and pimple and easily understood. 

Home office— New York City. Pacific Coast head office. 419 California 
Street, San Francisoo. .„.,,« « 

Jonn R. Heceman, President; Haley Piske, Vice-Presid*nt; Geo. B. 
Woodward, Secretary; George H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; James 
S> Roberts, Assistant Secretary- 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The American Away from Home. 



By Ben C. Truman. 
After having encountered the American man everywhere 
throughout his own domain and in nearly all the other civ- 
ilized countries, I am constrained to place him quite con- 
spicuously above all others so far as a net assay may de- 
duce. And I am fortified in this daring declaration by an 
almost unanimous opinion of many notable observers compe- 
tent to judge — for instance: 

I was one day, during the summer of 1887, a guest of Mr. 
George Augustus Sala at lunch at the Savage Club in Lon- 
don, and he said to me: "After a careful and energetic 
study of men, at home and abroad, I have concluded that 
the American heads the procession. He knows more of the 
every-day history of the world than any other; he is the 
most congenial person next to an Irishman on earth; he 
outranks all others in a business way; his dress and his 
manners are surely better than our own, and his English is 
acceptably better English generally than the English of Eng- 
lish people." I once met Mr. Sala after he had visited the 
United States, and in the course of an animated burst of 
praise of almost everything American, he concluded: "From 
one side of the continent to the other the glory of the 
American came upon me. I beheld his greatness as a miner 
and a manufacturer, and as a merchant and farmer; I saw 
him in politics, in finance, at home, at the hotel, and at the 
club. I mingled with the brightest and most radiant set 
of fellows at the Bohemian Club in San Francisco I have 
ever come in infectious contact with in my life." 

One June evening in 1889, in company with Mr. Harold 
Frederick, the American novelist, I was a guest at dinner 
at the Reform Club in London of Mr. MacDonald, managing 
editor of the Times, and I remember that he said: "The 
American is a superb blend — not of blood, altogether, but of 
good taste, good sense and good fellowship. He is charm- 
ing at dinner, and never cumbersome like the English. I 
am thoroughly happy when at the dinner table with Ameri- 
cans." 

Once upon a time Mr. George Alfred Townsend and I were 
strolling along Oxford street, and met Olive Logan, who in- 
vited us to accompany her to a tea at the garden home — up 
the Thames a short distance — of Miss Braddon, the novel- 
ist; and here we came across Mr. Henry Irving, Mr. Rider 
Haggard, young Mr. Dickens, and a number of others, who 
went on for an hour extravagantly about Americans, and 
especially regarding American manufactures, American 
newspapers and American girls. Mr. Irving just let himself 
out and remarked to Miss Logan about as follows: "The fact 
is, Americans are essentially cosmopolitan, and they adapt 
themselves far more easily to new surroundings than we 
English. They are, moreover, more free from prejudices. 
Of course, among 50.000,000 human beings there are some 
who are objectionable; but Americans on neutral ground, 
such as Paris, Switzerland, etc., are as a rule, a very great 
ueal more appreciated than we are, and this, I am sure, not 
because they are richer, but because they are mure pleas- 
ant and better mannered. We, rather than they, are, I am 
inclined to think, open to the reproach of being unendurable. 
We are either too brusque or too shy. Among ourselves we 
get on very well, but with foreigners we are not popular. 
Few Americans remain long enough in England to go into 
society. Those, however, who do, are always well received, 
and their manners undoubtedly contrast with considerable 
advantage with those of a very large number of English- 
men." And he said many more things regarding Americans 
in even a more complimentary way. 

Dr. Russel! (better known in our country as "Bull Run 
Russell,") who visited California as a guest of the Santa 
Fe Railroad Co. some seventeen years ago, said, in a book 
that he subsequently published: "It is rare that an Ameri- 
can man is not a good talker. He may have devoted more time 
to heaping up dollars than to the cultivation of art, sciences, 
or literature, but he has gained much curious experience in 
his avocation which he is ready to impart, while on general 
matters there is a freshness, shrewdness, and mental activ- 
ity, often allied with considerable humor, which makes his 
remarks worthy of attention. Although the accumulation 
of dollars may have been his particular mission, there is 
nothing mean or paltry in his mode of thought; he is a 



stanch friend and a pleasant acquaintance. Whether 
has won his fortune honestly or dishonestly, he knows h 
to spend it nobly. In this island of ours, where convent! 
alities are law and gospel, it is a relief to meet with a 
one who does not bow down before them, and who 1 
some sort of individuality." 

I could easily reproduce hundreds of similar observatic 
oil foreigners of note, but content myself with these f 
outspoken exaltations from notable Englishmen — themseli 
proverbially slow and deliberate in unequivocal recognitl 
of aggregated human excellences beyond their own lai 

Outside of our own country what has impressed me t 
most, by comparison, is the code of good manners ma 
tained by the American, and especially at the public tablf 
at the hotel, restaurant, and buffet. To be sure, in dr( 
he is nowhere alongside the Parisian, who ranks all oth< 
in this respect, and who is steadfastly so well apparel 
as. to be picked out readily. In fact, the Parisian is a clel 
looking, sleek-looking person, from occiput to toe. He 
variably top-dresses himself with a silk hat. rain or shii 
His shoes are like mirrors, so excellent have been thi 
polishing. His clothes are always in fashion and wi 
brushed. He seldom appears on the boulevards or at otB 
public places ungloved, and he generally carries a neat li 
brella or cane. He never presents himself at dinner in otk 
than evening dress. The stylish Spaniard, then the Italil 
then the Russian, Austrian and German follow in quail 
and neatness of attire. Continuing the sequence the Ej 
lishman comes next, in Paris, Berlin and Madrid, althou 
such is not the case in New York and San Francisco, espi 
tally hi the latter place, where the visiting Briton genera 
appears monstrously absurd or fantastically and inapp 
priately gotten up. Everywhere in Europe and in Egypt, 
ocean steamer and Nile boat, the Englishman dresses i 
dinner and sometimes for dejeuner. Coming to the Anuj 
can, he is the least punctilious of all regarding his hah 
ments, at least on the streets; for nearly every gentlenJ 
you meet on the Capucines and Italiens in Paris, on Bd 
and Piccadilly in London, and in the main thoroughfai 
cf Vienna and Berlin, with a slouch hat and seeming ca 
lessness of attire is an American. I do not mean that 
is shabbily clad or in the least repellant — he is the sal 
American you see going to and returning from business; 
American cities, especially in most places west of the Ol 
river; the same American you observe at the race-traj 
at the theatre, in the bar-room and on the promenade. ! 
disdains the maximum of style — his slouch or derby, I 
sack or cutaway, seems good enough for him. Nineteen I 
of twenty of the business millionaires of New York, Bosl 
and Chicago essay derbys and cutaways every day in 1 
year except Sundays. The same classes in other parts 
the world would wear redingotes and top hats. 

It is a fact well worthy of note that the table mannt 
of the American abroad are far better than of many of thl 
more genteelly costumed. He is less impatient, less roll 
of language, picks his teeth less, ana uses his pocket ha 
kerchief less boisterously than any others. At Shephei 
Hotel in Cairo, the Grand at Nice, the Cafe Martin nj 
Mentone, Grand at Monte Carlo, and Esteral at Cannei 
where Englishmen, Americans and other nationalities n 
be divided into about thirds, from December to Marc! 
without exception all but Americans attend dinners 
either evening dress or Casino suits. But it is a curious f 
that Englishmen always enter a salle a manger with bj 
hands in their breeches pockets and leave it with woo> 
toothpicks in their mouths. In conclusion, the Amerij 
in the smoking room or other rendezvous uses better H 
hsh than the Englishman; he is more respectful and m 
tolerant of the views of others, and he is a wittier, bet) 
informed person and much the better fellow all roul 
and especially is this the case with the "IrlBh-AmeriJ 
(so-called) of culture, travel and wealth. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the mofl 
It falls to euro. E. W. Grove's signature Is on each box. Price 25 cent* 

Trusts and combinations do not affect Jesse 

lis lame Is established, Its quality Is the finest nn.l ic is «!■ 
the best. 



January 11, 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



5>6e Last Rehearsal 

By Francis T. Cooke. 
Scene— The stage of vaudeville theatre. Thi . urtalu is 
<!own. and chairs, tables, rugs, lamps anJ other "Inside 
props" are piled about In chaotic contusion. Carpenters 
arc pouading at the scenery, and stage hands are carrying 
in merchandise. Enter Miss Uaud Morreau. who is starring 
In the thirty-minute sketch, "A Wifely Loi 

Maud— Nothing doing yet. (Petulantly). Those lobsters 
nevet do a thing but break their dates. How do 
n bard-working girl to make a success of a show when her 
(ompany never shows up to a rehearsal? 

(Enter Chaunrey McGowan cautiously.) 
Chauncey— Hello. Maud. YVaitin' for anybody? 
Maud— Waitin' for anybody! Naw, the shows through 
and I'm jusl waitin" for the gate receipts. Say, what d'you 
think I'm waitin' for? 
Chauncey — Say, Maud, don't get sore. Here comes Fitz- 
. hugh Morris, and we can rip off a yard of rehearsal in one, 
two, three order. 

(Enter Fitzhugh Morris. The three proceed to center of 
stage and begin.) 

Maud— Let's cut out the first part of the turn and begin at 
the goo-goo reconciliation scene. 

Chauncey (clasping her in his arms and reciting) — 
Gwendolyn, darling little wife, don't you remember (aside) 
Hully gee! What's the next? 

Maud — You lobster, why don't you learn your lines? 
Don't you remember the little cradle in the nursery upstairs 

where- our 

Chauncey — Oh, yes — don't you remember the nursery up- 
stairs where our chubby little boy played with the toys that 
now lie neglected and unused? 
Maud (reciting) — Don't, Charles, don't! 
Chauncey (reciting) — You loved me in those days, Gwen- 
dolyn, my wife — do you love me now? 

Maud (reciting)— Yes, Charles, dearest! (Aside)— Why 
don't you squeeze me tight when I put my head on your 
shoulder? Anybody would think that I was up against a 
lamp-post. Why don't you limber up? 

Chauncey (aside) — Shoot that wad of gum — you make me 
nervous. Where did we leave off? 
Maud (prompting) — Yes, Charles, yes! 
Chauncey (reciting) — Gwendolyn, my own loyal wife! 
(Beckoning to Morris off stage) Come on, why don't you? 
Maud — My husband! (falls on his neck.) 

(Enter Morris oriskly.) . 

Morris (reciting) — I represent the firm of Plunger & 
Bluffer, and I have been delegated to tell you that there is 
?25,000 in the bank at your disposal, dividends from your 
investment in the Bedrock Oil Company. 

Chauncey (stepping front center and taking Maud's 
hand) — So, Gwendolyn, you have made me the happiest man 
in the world and a firm believer in A Wifely Love. 

Maud — That's the curtain. Now, let's get in and go over 

that love scene again 

Chauncey — Nay, lady, me and Fitzhugh have got a date 
at Spaghetti's and it's a case of skip along. 
(Exeunt Chauncey and Morris.) 
Maud (sol) — Now, ain't that a daisy gold brick to hand out 
to an audience? 



THE BURGLAR AND THE MERCIFUL JUDGE. 



John A. Swift, a special policeman, had his star taken 
away from him last week because he won the affections of 
Gertie Penebsky by dint of falsely representing himself as 
a son of Sergeant Michael Joseph Conboy. Gertie had 
evidently heard of the doughty Michael Joseph, for when 
she gave ear to the speedy Mr. Swift's wily allegations, she 
fell on his neck without a demur. Michael Joseph ought to 
take the young woman's act in the light of a sincere flat- 
tery. In fact, it is up to him to claim as a blushing bride 
the trustful Gertie, who counted mere relationship to Ser- 
geant Michael Joseph Conboy as a sufficient matrimonial 
guarantee. Perhaps Gertie traced the family resemblance 
through the skillful blarney of the deceitful Swift. 



By Elwyn Hoffman. 
rglar who for years had piled 

His thrifty trade both far and wide, 

At last was caught, 'spite of his guile, 

And brought before a Judge for trial. 

He pleaded guilty, and the I 

Who thought compassion not all fudge, 

And that the cracksman's honest plea 

Entitled him to leniency, 

Was just about, in accents grave, 

To pass, upon the contrite knave. 

The lightest sentence that his case 

Would warrant, when, with pleading face, 

The burglar said: "I freely own 

My misdeeds, and I'd fain atone. 

Indeed, your Honor, had the Law 

Not seized me in its iron maw 

Just when it did, another day 

Had found me on the narrow way, 

Reformed, and never more to err — 

I was about to marry, sir." 

The Judge was silent for awhile, 
Then looked down with a kindly smile. 
"I'm glad you told me that," said he, 
"For I'm a married man, you see, 
And know full well what fate were yours 
If soon you pass the prison's doors, 
And free of jails, resigned your life 
Into the keeping of a wife. 
You've done much evil in your day, 
But after all we're common clay, 
And though a Judge, I'm still a man 
And must show mercy as I can. 
I'll serve you, so restrain your tears — 
Clerk, make his sentence ninety years." 



MANSFIELD SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

Golden, Gate Hall, 629 Sutter Street. Tuesdays and Fridays at 3:30 p. m. 
Pupils may enroll at any time. Private lessons at your residence or Hall. 
Residence, 961 Geary Street. Phone Larkin 2643. One Lesson Free. 



Mr. Charles J. Anderson, the wealthy Klondiker, has prob- 
ably concluded by this time that poverty has its compensa- 
tions. He made a fortune in the icy north and married a 
variety actress, who got most of his fortune. He went back 
and made a lot more money, with which he came back to 
San Francisco and wooed Miss Alma de Brettville. She con- 
sented, after long persuasion, to marry him. Now he has 
concluded that he will stay single, and Miss de Brettville 
has sued him for ?50,000 damages. From all accounts, Alma 
didn't want to marry him anyway; also, he purchased a 
bunch of the pictures she painted at enormous sums, and 
showered diamonds upon her. If, in addition to all this; 
Alma gets $50,000 for being thrown over by a man she 
didn't want, she may be congratulated upon having struck 
a little Klondike of her own. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR AND MOLES DESTROYED. 

Madame Boling, 407 b Hyde Street. 
Superflous hair and moles destroyed with the electric needle. Refer- 
ences given. Terms, 83.00 an hour. Hours 1 to 5 p. m. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. 

JAMES M. F. DAVIS. Plaintiff, vs. NETTIE DAVIS, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court, City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California, and the complaint tiled in said City and County of San 
Francisco, in the office of the Clerk of said Superior Court. 

The People of the State of California send greeting to Nettle Davis, de- 
fendant. 

You are hereby directed to appear and answer the complaint in an action 
entitled as above, brought against you in the Superior Court. City and 
County of San Francisoo, State of California, within ten days after the 
service on you of this summons, if serveii within this County; or within 
thirty days If served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unlesB you so appear and answer, the 
said plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of said Superior Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California, this seventeenth day of Aug- 
ust. 1901. WM. A. DBANE, Clerk. 

(Seal.) By E. M. THOMPSON, Deputy Clerk. 

NOTICE. 

The nature of the cause of action set forth in and the relief demanded by 
the above mentioned complaint are as follows: 

The action Is brought to seoure a divorce from defendant on the ground 
of the willful desertion by the defendant of plaintiff: and the relief sought 
is the dissolution of the bonds of matrimony now holding together plaintiff 
and defendant. 

PETER T. RILEY and J. F. RrLEY, Attorneys for plaintiff, 416 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 




^^j ar im 




A CHRISTMAS MINUET. 
(Minns Irvine, in The Crtic.) 
When silver flutes and violins 

In Christmas-land are sighing 
A dreamy waltz that sets the feet 

Of youths and maidens flying, 
I see among the plain black coats 

And girlish rosebud faces 
Strange figures of the long ago 

Come out and take their places. 

In stomachers and gay brocades 

That Time has stained and faded, 
In buckled shoes and velvet suits 

With gold belaced and braided, 
They tread a stately minuet, 

The courtliest of dances, 
And underneath the mistletoe 

Renew their old romances. 

When chimes are rung and carols sung 

And snow the landscape covers, 
The spirit of the olden time 

Around the holly hovers. 
Then every shadow to my gaze 

A powdered head discloses, 
And all the air is faintly sweet 

With lavender and roses. 

With lifted skirts of pink and blue, 

They courtesy down the middle, 
I hear, above the stops and strings, 

The spinet and the fiddle, 
The creaking of a coach and four 

Between the pines and laurels, 
And footsteps in the frozen snow 

That vanish with the carols. 



WE MAY LOVE. 

(.John Vance Cheney, in the Atlantic Monthly.) 
From the withered, bitter ground 

Every sweet has taken leave, 
Joy there's none, of sight or sound : 

Naught to do but sit and grieve? 
Look — the blue! bent close above. 
Close above; 

While it hovers we may love, 
We may love. 



ONE POET TO ANOTHER. 
[By Katharine Pearson Woods.) 
(Accompanying a manuscript sonnet — with emandations). 
My True-love's lute I love to tune aright, 

So truly doth he sing of truest love; 
His lightsome lay makes night's cold shadows bright. 
When his clear lute is truly tuned aright, 
Each note glows golden to the ravished sight, 

Each soul of man doth with that music move — 
When his true lute my True-love tunes aright, 

And sings, to Heaven and me, of deathless love. 

His lightsome lay makes night's cold shadows bright, 
For, at his singing, see, my sun doth rise. 

Then all my life is radiant in men's sight. 

My earth outheavens Heaven's own golden light. 

As night grows day, so day is dimmed to night. 
But the true measure that my True-love tries. 

His lightsome lay makes night's cold shadows bright, 
For, at his singing, see, my sun doth rise. 

Now, since my life is radiant in men's eyes. 

My True-love's lute I seek to tune aright; 
And all my flow'rs, gathered 'neath twilight skies 
(Ere, to his music, my life's sun did rise), 
I twine about, to please the world's cold eyes, 
His lovesome lute. 

Ah! fragrant flow'rs and bright 
For me he sings! 

Therefore my sun doth rise, 
Whether or no his lute be tuned aright. 



The 
Tribune 



NEWSPAPER NOTE 

OAKLAND'S 

GREAT 

EVENING 

NEWSPAPER 



|c managed, for San 

" Francisco advertising business, 
by F. R Porter, whom 
consult; tariff inviting. 
9 Powell street, Columbia 
Theatre Building, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
ESTATE OF GILES S. BROWN, also known as G. 8. BROWN, De- 
ceased. 

Notice la hereby given by the undersigned, GEORGIE BROWN. Execu- 
trix of the last will and testament of D cea»ed, to the creditomof, and all 
persons having; claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necess-ry vouchers, within four month- after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said GEORGIE BROWN, Executrix, at the office of J. F. 
RILEY. Attorney-at-Law, Rooms 65 lo&H. 410 t alifornia street, fan Fran- 
cisco. California, the same being her place for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estnte in the City and County of . San Franolsoo, State of 
California. 

GEORGIE BROWN. 
Executrix of the last will and testament of GILES S. BROWN, also 

known as G. S. BROWN. Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco, December 23, 191,1, 

J. P. RILEY, 
Attorney for Executrix, 416 California street. Booms 55-68. 

DISSOLUTION OF COPARTNERSHIP. 

The copartnership heretofore existing between R. C. RoBonberg, G. A 
Rosenberg, and L. R. Rosenberg, and Mary Rosenberg, doing husiness in 
the City and County of San Francisco, Stale ot Californ a. and also in ilie 
City of Boston, Htate of Massachusetts, under the linn name and style of 

'JACOB ROSENBERG'S SONS." Wool C mission Merchants, is this day 

dissolved by the mutual consent of the respective parlies thereto. 

It. O- Rosenberg will continue in the said business under Ihe same name 
of "JACOB ROSENBERG'S SONS," at No 221 Front Street, San Fran- 
cisco, and will liquidate all the partne ship debts contrnoted In the State of 
California. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have hereunto executed 
these presents in duplicated this thirtieth day of July A. D, 1901. 

R. C. ROSENBERG 
G. A- ROSENBERG- 
MARY ROSENBERG. 
L. R. ROSENBERG. 




ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 



423 Post street- between Powell and Miuiod, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. Y'.iZ 



W. E. Brldee. proprietor. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Blake, Moffit & Towne Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall 4 Co. Por"and Or 



Telephone Main 199. 

DEALERS IN PAPER 

5-57-59-61 First street S. F 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA 
BITTERS, the great 

Mexican remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 

Depot at 323 Market St., San Francioco. Sena for circular 

Pacific Towel Company no. 9 uck piece 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels Si per month; 12 hand or 
roller towels 81. 50 per month. Tel. Main 1780. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

582 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F, 

Deposits July 1. 1901... f28,97S,M0 Reserve Fund 1126.99 

Paid-up Capital 1.000,000 Contingent Fund «5.617 



E. B. PON D. Pr esident 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



W. O. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Maeree, W. O. B. de Fremery. CO 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jaoob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may bo made In checks payable 
In San Franolsco, Post Office, or Welle Farico A Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commenoes only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No chance is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenln&rs, for receipt of de 
posits only 6:3U to 8 o'clock. 






January 11, 1902. 



London and San Francisco Bank, usm 

4M CALIFORNIA STRKKT. 
HKAf> OmOM I-omb»r.J Hi— I, London. 

QkplUU Authorised. llJOn.OOO. CkplUtl PfeM Dp. $1,400,000. 

lMrector*-Henrr Ooschen. Chairman. LondODi ChrUtliin de Gulgne . 
S*n Franctaeo; Cfclllt Henierr. London; John L. How»ni. Son Fran- 
olooo; Bondli Koppol. Ix>n<lon : tircviiic Konlny PnlmoT, London ; Norman 
It Mdoonl. San Fmnd»co: Arthur Scrivener. *<ondon. 

In»p*otor of Hr*nch^«. QiiiUt Frlederle* 

ArnU In New York. Moonro. J, P. Ki «u A Oo. 

BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon: 1 -j^ua. Wash.. Seattle. Wash- 

letter* of creilll (uuod arallahte lor traveler* and the purchase of mot- 
< ti»mH«e In any city ol the world. Deal In foreign and domestic cxcha nee 
AeeounU ol country banks received. Terms on application. 

IOC, Ckahlet W. Mackintosh. M«im ep r 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With whloh (s amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital, t8.000.000- Reserve Fund, 92,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over 9S5.000.000- 

Hon- Geo- A- Cox. President: B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager, 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St.. E- C-. S. Cameron Alexander, Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Plaoe. Alex- Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTAJtIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson, White Horse: British Columbia: Atlin, Cranbrook. Fernle 
Greenwood, Earuloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Rosaland 
Sandon, Vancouver. Victoria- In the United Slates— New York, N. Y. San 
Frandsoo. Cat. Seattle. Wash- Portland. Ore- Skagway, Alaska. 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franolsoo Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kains, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansohe and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 92.600,000 Paid-Up Capital, 92,000.000 

Reserve Fund. 91,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London. E. O. 

AGENTS: New York— Agenoy ol the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited. No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres A Cle, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager. 

B. AI/TSCHTJL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Franolsoo 
Jas. K. Wilson, President "Wm. Piebcb Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Gowqill. Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL 9500,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. 9130,000. 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, Win. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierre, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank : 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London--* 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 91,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, 9300,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts ol individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
faid on tbubt dbposits and savinos. Invbbtkbntb carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A. Frederick, vice-President : H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Exonenberg, W. A- Frederick, Fred A. Kuhls, E 
A, Denioke, A- G. Wieland, Fred Woerner. J. O, Rued, Fred O. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Capital Authorized 96,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Agents at New York— J. A W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
grapblo transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LHJENTHAL. Managers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

BANKING. 



23 



Paid Up 91,500,000 

Reserve Fund... 700,000 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St Mills Bulldlne. 



Interest paid on deposits. 



WIUlamAlvord 
William Baboock 
Adam Grant 



Loans hade. 
DIRECTORS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 

W. S, Jones 



Wells Fargo & Company Bank 



l*rc«tdenl 
Manager 
fashler . 

udiib . 
2nd. Asat. Cashier, 



JOB* J. VaI F.NTISK, 

8. Kin. j. . 

M. \V \ li»H I'KTll 
I*. L IlI'MAN. 
II. I- Mn.rn; 



( Portland. Or.. 



San Kranclnco 

. . Bai 

Nun Francisco 

■ Hull 1'rr.i 

Sun Kranolsco 
II. H. PABtOm. < iwilitcr 

J. K. Hi it ii. v. Oaahlar 

U. I.ki Bum, ' ii.Iilrr 

Statement of Condition at Close of Business, July 31, 1901. 
Loan. ASSETS 

Benin Stocks and Wr.rraxte *'" i!i '°'-' ,',', 

Real Estate ? JXlSmK 

Ml.oellancous Assets mImm 

I>u-j from Banks and Banksrr, 1.1M.MB.U 
■■'.'.'. a'mS,«llM 



LIABILITIES «1W»M»..7 

^vwedPioiw.::;:::::::::::::::::::::::;:;.:::::::: KfffflS 

Deposits. Banks and Bankers '. llaiiS'S 

dividual :::::::::::::;::::.":: sKmSS 



„ , . 819.589.558.17 

.1, w "il i?"* bu9,1, < !88 1 in "II "« branches. Correspondents throughout 
the World. Accounts received on favorable terms. 



B. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MeCutohen 
B. H, Poase 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 82.000.000. 

Surplus, $1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits, October 1, 1901, 12,851,860.11. 

i¥rSir£ K ; ^i 5 !? 01 ^ Vice-Pres'l I. P. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ATJ ' K " M - CLAY Secretary I SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltlmore-r-The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
SKri , v. e Sr„ ni i n . 0l . s Tru8t and Savings Bank; Plrst National Bank. 
™ 1? delphla-Phlladelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
M™ City, Nev.— Aeency of The Bank of California. London-Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild <fe Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothsohlld Preres. Berlin— 
JJlrection der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China. Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank ol Australia, Ltd.. and Bank ol New Zealand. 

Letters of oredlt Issued, available tn all parts of the world. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,316,381.43 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000,000 00 

Deposits December 31. 1901 30.766.033.17 

BOARD OF DIREOTORS-President, B. A. Becker: FlrBt Vice-President 
John Lloyd: Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 
, H. Horstmann. Ien. SMnhart, H. B. Rusa, Emll Rohte, N Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. B. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, Georee Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attor 
ney, W. S. Goodlellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Bulldlne. 

Guaranteed Capital Jl.OOO.OOO. Paid Up Capital tSOO.OOO 

James D. Phblan, President S. G. Mubpht, Vice-President 

Geoege A. Stoey, Cashier Johh A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobsoh, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, 8. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Prank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Clias. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fareo & Co., or Exchange o» 
elty banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital..$12,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8250,000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members el vine first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Oal. 

Wm. Corbin, General Manager 

Crocker-WoolWortk National Bank 

OF BAN FRANCISCO 
Ooenkk Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital tL.000 000 

Wm. H. Ceookbb, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

C. E. Green, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant cashie 

Directors — W. H. Orooker. B. B Pond. Georee Crocker, O. E. Green, G.VV 
Kline, Henry J. Orooker. G. W, Scott 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 



OBITUARY. 



Death has called John A. Russell, who for thirty-four con- 
secutive years was clerk of the San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors. He died at his home in Alameda last Satur- 
iay morning. Mr. Russell had been ill for two years of 
jaralysis, and his death was not unexpected. Mr. Russell 
vas a native of Scotland, where he was born sixty-nine years 
igo. He came to California in 1850, and worked as a miner, 
ater coming to San Francisco. In 1866 he was made assist- 
int clerk of the Board of Supervisors, and on the death of 
he chief clerk in 1868, he was appointed to that office. He 
leld his position longer than any official ever in the employ 
>f the city, his merit gaining him re-appointment from each 
lew Board of Supervisors. He made himself an authority 
m municipal affairs, and his advice was often of great 
jenefit to the city's rulers. He was a Mason, and the 
uneral took place from Masonic Temple Monday. The de- 
leased left three daughters — Mrs. Edgar Painter, Mrs. Ed- 
vard A. Younger, and Miss Ada Russell. He died liked and 
espected by all who knew him. 

Mr. J. Richard Freud, Civil Service Commissioner and 
secretary of the Merchants' Association, died at his home 
n this city Monday morning of heart trouble. His death 
vas sudden and unexpected. Mr. Freud was hardly more 
han forty at the time of his death, but he had made 
limself one of the leading citizens of San Francisco. He 
i.'as in business for awhile, then studied law, at the practice 
}f which he was very successful. He had been the sec- 
retary of the Merchants' Association since its formation, 
ind through his connection with that body became inter- 
ested in municipal affairs, making a study of all economic 
juestions. He was appointed by Mayor Phelan to the Civil 
Service Commission. Mr. Freud's death is a loss to our 
:ity, and is mourned by thousands. He left a widow and 
wo sons. 



HUNDREDS OF ACRES OF SEEDS. 
The development of the seed-raising industry in California 
las been wonderful. Large tracts of land are devoted to 
his branch of agriculture, as is the case with the Cox Seed 
io., of San Francisco, which now has eighteen hundred acres 
levoted to the raising of vegetables and flower seeds of ail 
arieties. They have recently purchased five hundred acres 
n the San Joaquin Valley, which is now being prepared for 
lse for the coming season. While visiting the company's 
store a few days ago the writer was shown an order from a 
seed house in France for seven thousand pounds of seeds. 
rhere is scarcely a seed house in the United States that 
loes not receive a large bulk of its supplies from the Cox 
5eed Co. One can purchase from them either a small packet 
ir a ton of seed. The fact that they are all raised in 
California, and that the company supplies other houses in- 
stead of drawing supplies from them gives the purchaser 
issurance that the seeds are genuine and fresh. The 
jompany has just issued its annual catalogue, profusely il- 
ustrated, and containing quotations on the seeds of every 
lower or vegetable known. It is worth perusing. 



Dr. S. A. Knopf, of New York, says that consumption is 
lot contagious. Others of equal enlightenment on the sub- 
ject say that it is contagious. There is hope that in a few 
hundred years from now doctors may know something about 
lonsumption. It seems at present that they merely know of 
ts existence. 



Position wanted as secretary or governess by young Eng- 
lish lady, refined, experienced; understands shorthand and 
:ypewriting; university education; highest references. Ad- 
Jress Miss Harriet Follis, care Y. M. C. A., Oakland, Cal. 



Evenings Profitably Spent. 

J. W. Griffith, Principal of Heald's Business College Night 
school, at 24 Post street, City, reports large attendance of young 
ind middle age people. The Night School's popularity is due un- 
ioubtedly to the excellent opportunity afforded persons to secure a 
thorough business training without interfering with their occupa- 
tion during the day. The course includes commercial and English 
training of the most practical character, and qualifies its pupils for 
.ucrative positions in the best business houses. Terms moderate. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For tbe eix months ending December 31, 1901, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company, as follows; 
On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of 3 per cent- per annum, free of taxes, and payable on 
and after Thursday, January 2, 1902- Dividends uncalled for are added to 
the principal and bear the same rate of dividend as the principal from and 
after January 1. 1902. J. DALZELL BROWN. Manager. 

Office — Corner California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending with December3l. 1901. a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three (3) per cent, per annum on nil deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Thursday, January 2, 1902. 

GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 

Officc-526 California Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1901, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and forty-two one-hundredths 
(3 42-10i>) per cent, on term deposits and three (3) per cent- on ordinary de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday. January 2, 1902. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 

Office— 532 California 9treet, corner Webb. San Francisco. Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-eighth (3%) 
per cent- per annum on all deposits for the six months ending December 
31. 1901 ; free from ail taxes, and payable on and ufler January 2, 1902. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones street, San Francisco. Cal. 

December 30, 1901. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending December 31. 1901. dividends on term deposita 
at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, and on or- 
dinary deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent, per annum, free of taxes. 
will be payable on and after January 2, 1902. 

S. L. ABBOT. JR.. Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery street. Mills Building. ?a» Francisco, Cnl. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The board » f directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1901, at the rate of three and one-eighth (3%) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1902. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the 
principal from and after January 1, 1902. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31st, 1001, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three (3) per cent, per annum on all deposits, free of 
taxes, and payable on and after Thursday, January 2, 1902. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Spring Valley Water Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held nt the office of the company, No. 125 Stockton street, 
San Francisco, California, at twelve o'clock M., on Wednesday, the eighth 
day of January, 1902, to elect Trustees to serve for the ensuing year and for 
the ti-iinsuctlon of such other business aa may be brought before the meet- 
ing. PELHAM W. AMES, Secretary. 

Sun Francisco, December 25, 1901. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
San Francisco Gas and Electric Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas and 
Electric Company will be held at the office of the company, 415 Post street, 
In the City and County of San Francisco, at 12 o'clock M-, on Tuesday, 
January 21st, 1902. The transfer books of the company will be closed from 
January 10th, 1902, to atid including January 21et, 1902. (Signed) 

WILLIAM G. BARRETT, Secretary. 

Dated San Francisco, January 6, 1902. 

MoetSc 
Chccndon 



CHAMP <\GNE 



WHITE SEAL and BRUT IMPERIAL 
Celebrated Vintage of 1893 
Unsurpassed in quality. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 



Mrs. Kathleen Aethdr Duff, pupil of La Jennesae, Royal College of 
Music. Stuttgart method endorsed and approved by LWat, Stephen 
Heller and others. From 2 to 4 p. in. 618 Golden Gate Ave. 



216-218 MISSION STREET 



Pacific Coast Agents. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ary 11. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 




'1 Ml Is ikowi llir 
m \ i.r In. I|i I. ni Hi. 
V Wk Of Ilir 

PRESIDENT 

SUSPENDERS 



C. A. F.DOAKTOV Mil. 
ill n°x '-' II, Sklrlrr. Ma 



MNING FOREIGN GOVERNMENT 

CONTRACTS. 

ere probably Is no more interest- 
eature of the broadening of Amer- 
commereial horizon than the bid- 
for foreign government supplies. 
B Is a plcturesqueness and a flnan- 
rlltter about the awarding of large 
acts which seem extremely at- 
Ive to our manufacturers. It is 
Aing to sell a dozen bales of eot- 
:oods to a local importer in Tien- 
and quite another to supply under 
act to the Chilean Government 
ay material valuer! at four million 
rs. or five hundred thousand bar 
of flour to feed the British forces 
Juth Africa. Such contracts are 
I means uncommon; in fact, hardly 
ek passes without seeing one or 
important contracts awarded to 
id States manufacturers. The pres- 
■ear promises well in foreign gov- 
ent work for supplies, 'in railroad 
ing is this especially true. Several 
hs ago the Belgian Government ap- 
!d estimates for the purchase of 
us rolling stock for the State rail- 
I The statement was sent out 
the office of the Minister of Rail- 
Post and Telegraph, No. 11 Rue 
ain, Brussels, that about 15,000,000 
s ($2,895,000) had been appropri- 
for the acquisition of 155 heavy 
lotives of various types, 180 ten- 
and a quantity of other railway 
rial. Within the past six months 
•agua has placed an order with its 
; in New York for 2,400 tons ot 
rails for the new central branch 
e National Railroad, which is be- 
onstructed by a German engineer, 
contract is significant, because of 
act that heretofore Nicaragua has 



Soft 
Harness 

You can make your har- 
ness as soft as a glove 
and as tough as wire by 
using EUREKA Hur- 
tle as Oil* You can 
lengthen its life— make it 
last twice as long as It 
ordinarily would. 

EUREKA 

Harness Oil 

mokes a poor looking har- 
ness like new. Made of 
pure, heavy bodied oil, es- 
pecially prepared to with* 
stand the weather. 

Sold everywhere 
In cans— all sizes. 

Made by STANDARD OIL CO. 



always pun ' In Germany and 

England, and doublj because the 

contractor Is a German In thin case, 
as In the majority, it is the all-im- 
portant question of time From no 
country could the ral ■ '-n ob- 

tained in the time required. 

\ survey of the Held proves beyond 
peradventnre thai the p sent year win 
in the num- 
ber of important contracts to be 
awarded by foreign governments and 
individual corporations. The cessation 
of hostilities in South Africa is bound 
to result not only In renewed commer- 
cial activity but also in the inaugura- 
tion or completion of public works. It 
will be necessary to repair the rav- 
ages of war. and to restore the trans- 
portation lines to their former degree 
of efficiency. A new railroad is to be 
built in Korea, and the bids for equip- 
ment are certain to be given to Ameri- 
can contractors. Reports from China 
indicate that the modern electric tram 
soon will roll through the narrow wind- 
ing streets of more than one Mongolian 
city. Other countries are contemplat- 
ing extensive improvements in many 
fields. 

A visit recently made to a number of 
the foreign legations in Washington de- 
termined the fact that American export" 
ers will be enabled to bid on many valu- 
able contracts during 1902. It is the 
rule of a number of countries to ad- 
vertise impending public works through 
their legations abroad, but it is only 
during the past two years that the 



The beginning of Window Happi- 
ness lsnahado roller that Is obedi- 
ent and faithful— one that is guar- 
anteed not to give trouble. 

THAT ONE IS THE GENUINE 




United States has been considered a 
factor in this important distribution of 
commercial chances. The sudden and 
spectacular entrance of this country in- 
to the arena of foreign trade has altered 
conditions so radically that the majority 
of the legations in Washington now re- 
ceive and exhibit all the official specifi- 
cations issued by their respective coun- 
tries. The Secretary to the Japanese 
Legation in Washington stated to the 
writer that the only fault to be found 
with the American exporter is that he 
seems too busy with the domestic 
branch of his business to keep himself 
informed of foreign market conditions, 
also that there is a paucity of mediums 
in this country by which such import- 
ant intelligence as pending foreign con 
tracts can be published. "In Japan," he 
added, "we have our gazettes and also 
quarterly publications devoted to that 
purpose. I understand, too, that both 
France and Germany have periodicals 
whose sole duty is to see that their 
manufacturing and contracting interests 
are kept in touch with commercial op- 
portunities in every part of the world." 
— The World's Work. 



Pat — So Kelly is dead? Mike — Yis. 
He hadn't an inimy in th' wur-r-uld! 
Mike— Phat did he die of? Mike— He 
was killed in a foight! 



The lamp with 
wrong chimney is 
like a letter without 
a stamp : Don t 

Macbeth. 

! 

! 

i My name on every one, 

i If you'll send your address, I'll send yon 
the Index to Lamps and their Chimneys, to 
tell you what number t > get for your lamp. 
Macbeth, Pi i:burgh. 



"Well, madam," said the head of the 
house, who has apparently got out ot 
bed on the wrong side, "what have you 
got for breakfast this morning? Boiler 
eggs, eh? Seems to me you never have 
anything but boiled eggs. Boiled Ere- 
bus! And what else, madam, may I 
ask?" "Mutton chops, my dear," says 
the wife, timidly. "Mutton chops!" 
echoes the husband, bursting into a 
peal of sardonic laughter — "mutton 
chops! I could have guessed it. By 
the living Jingo, madam, if ever I eat 

another meal inside of this house " 

And, jamming on his hat and slamming 
the door, the aggrieved man bounds 
down the stairs and betakes himself to 
the restaurant. "What'll you have, sir?" 
says the waiter, politely, handing him 
the bill of fare. "Ah," says the guest, 
having glanced over it, "let me see. 
Bring me two boiled eggs and a mutton 
chop!" 



Hewitt — What a homely girl she is! 
Jewett — Well', I should say so; even her 
pictures in the pewspapers flatter her. 



The Patient— You idiot! Didn't you 
tell me the pain would be all over in a 
second? Dentist — Well, don't you feel 
the pain all over you? 



THE NAME OF 

vose 

upon a piano does not add 
to its cost, but it is a gen- 
uine guarantee of 

Excellence of Tone, 
Honesty of Construction, 

and 
Absolute Durability. 

Call and see for yourself if the 
piano does not bear out the 
assertion. 

Sold for cash or on the monthly 
payment plan and for rent. 
We sell other makes of pianos 
at prices that defy competi= 
tion. 

One price to everybody. 

BENJAMIN CURTAZ & SON, 

1 6 to 20 OTarrell St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 



Some Public Misbehaviors 



A Commentary on the Manners of People on the Street, and 
Some Rules for Public Conduct, with a Disquisition on 
the Holding of Hands in Public, as Furnished Me by the 
Shade of Cotton Mather. 



In afternoon or evening rambles along our city's principal 
highway, the Market-street of the town, one who is of an 
observant or critical turn of mind may see many things 
which call for at least admonitory, if not harsh, criticism. 
The writer of these lines does not wish to appear in the light 
of a censor — few, indeed, are qualified to fill such a posi- 
tion; but it is within the province of the humblest of us 
to note such actions among our friends and neighbors as 
do not tend toward the public welfare, and do not conform 
to the rules of conduct set forth by people who are quali- 
fied by birth, training or education to lay down lines of de- 
portment for the guidance of others. 

This main thoroughfare of the town is, on every fine after- 
noon and evening, crowded with a vast concourse of our citi- 
zens, many of them idlers from choice, and many, alas, so 
sadly unfortunate as to be unable to exchange the labor of 
their hands or brains for the wherewithal to obtain their 
daily sustenance. But it is chiefly with women of discreet 
years that this street is thronged, especially on Saturdays 
at about the hour of five in the evening, at which time 
the play-houses finish their performances. They come forth 
all tricked out in their gayest finery, watching from the cor- 
ners of their eyes for glances of approval from idlers of the 
opposite ses, and smirking complacently when they receive 
them. The men, I am sorry to relate, are not backward in 
returning these glances, and in that way they are often 
trapped into association with women of such character as 
no gentleman should be seen with. 

It is not alone the impropriety of such conduct upon which 
1 wish to dwell, but I wish to call attention to the reprehen- 
sible example it sets the young. There are to be seen on this 
street, at the times mentioned, many youths and maidens 
who, just released from their occupations, use this thor- 
oughfare on their way home. There are apprentice girls 
from factories, girls who serve food to patrons of the various 
eating houses of our city, and others who wait upon cus- 
tomers in the many huge shops that line this market thor- 
oughfare. They all take example of their elders, and it is 
no uncommon sight to see a youth just out of his teens turn 
around and speak to a damsel of still less years, making ap- 
pointments for future meetings, much to the scandal of 
the morally and religiously inclined, who hold, and justly 
so, that all social intercourse between people of immature 
years should be carefully guarded. 

- The holding of hands, except between betrothed or wedded 
couples, and then only to a limited extent and in private, 
is a matter to which too stringent rules cannot be applied. 
The extent to which people indulge this pernicious habit 
in public is appalling to one of sober and staid mind. The 
fact that generally an attempt is made to conceal the act 
Joes not lessen its viciousness. But often couples may be 
observed, generally from the suburban localities parading 
our principal highways and byways with hands clasped, 
totally unconscious of the disapproving or laughing gaze of 
the passing multitude. Some contend that their so doing 
betokens innocence, but to me it is an inherited wickedness, 
which will call for terrible torture in the next world. But 
worse than these, because they add deception to the other 
sin, are they who hold hands in secret. They deceive many, 
but practice and an earnest desire to reform the universe 
has trained my eye so that they are unable to deceive me. 
They may be seen on public conveyances, with hands clasped 
under the men's cloaks, and, with a devil-born cunning, en- 
deavoring to appear innocent of crime. The habit is also 
very prevalent on the ferries that ply between our town and 
the villages on the other side of the bay. The play-house, 
to which a spirit of investigation sometimes leads me, is 
also a favorite place for these wrong-doers. I believe that 
the large hats which maidens now wear are especially de- 
signed so that when they are taken off there is room for 
s pair of hands under»them. At the play the other night 



! noted a maiden who had the prettiest blue eyes and peachy 
cheeks and a smile that would rattle a bishop. Say! She 
was a little queen, and — ah! I find that contact with this 
vicious world is corrupting me, and that if I do not put a 
curb on myself I will soon become even as the wicked 
throngs I meet each day. 

W. J. W. 



The San Francisco Fire Dispatch receives alarms 

simultaneously with the Fire Department. A subscriber 
is immediately notified if the fire is near his place of busi- 
are immediately notified if te fire is near his place of busi- 
ness, and is taken to the scene of the fire. 



Good food, good wines, good music and exceptionally 

good service make Techau Tavern the most popular place 
in town. A favorite after-the-theatre resort. 




GHj^MPAGNE 




Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 

_-_ . (Formerly In Mllla Building 

Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 

Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL MILL" 

Devotes if b entire revenue to the embellishment of its grounds. Burials 
are continuing as heretofore- Plots and Graves for Male, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perpetual care of Hume. Within '.() minutes of Kearny Street. 
Many street car lines pass the gate. 

Tel weBt68. Bush and Central Ave., San Francisco 

GEORGE GOODMAN 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Sehilllneer's Patent) in all its branches. Sidewalk 
and garden walk a specialty. 

Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, San Francisco 

D icl-*^^C For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
fjll JSr 1 C^ S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, oannera 
*— " *-* dyers, flour mills, foundries, lauudrles, paper-limit:- 

ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, taUers, etc. 

BUCHANAN BPUS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St, S. F. Tel., 661 



January 11, 1902. 



SAN FRANciSCO NEWS LETTER. 



k7 



The Banner o/the Pork and Soap Arlington Hotel 



Jan. 



mule, ye mo. ian lis on jroui Uuom 

T« k who hol.l 

By iiint of indent pedlgn 
BehoM. the Yankee has arrived— 
-n your jobs, abii.i Ion hope 
Before the splendor of his arms. 

The Banner of the Pork and Soap. 

ir border see them come 

All jingling bolts and shingle nails. 
The Yankee dish-pan is their dram, 

Their ordnance is cotton bales. 
With Yankee shoes and Yankee booze. 

With Yankee corn and Yankee rope, 
Tliey scale your walls and hail your halls 

Beneath the flag of Pork and Soap. 

From Tartary came Ghengis Khan, 

Hengist once from Northland wild, 
The Normans bore their arms of 

To overthrow the Saxon's child — 
But what a sign of war is this 

Across old Europe's horoscope. 
When Yankee warriors bear afield 

The Banner of the Pork and Soap! 

What boots your fast decaying pomp. 

What boots your blazoned banners furled? — 
The business man American 

Is making tooth-picks for the world, 
The van of Trade has battered in 

The frontier walls of King and Pope, 
While crowns and scepters fall to earth 

Before the Sign of Pork and Soap. 
5, 1902. WALLACE IRWIN. 



Mr. Ernest Seton-Thompson, or Mr. Ernest Seton, or Mr. 
Thompson, or Mr. Ernest Thompson-Seton, or whatever his 
name may happen to be at the time of going to press, has 
failed to practice what he has made a fortune preaching 
about, for he is in sore trouble in Colorado for the reason 
that he has been breaking the game laws and there is a box 
full of pelts of slaughtered deer and bear to show for it. 
That Mr. Thompson-Seton has been ruthlessly killing his 
friends of hill and wood seems a piece of base ingratitude 
in the face of the fact that these same friends have made 
:■ fortune for the writer. The News Letter always supposed 
that his surpassing nature love was a profitable pose on the 
part of the author, and recent developments have proven the 
supposition conclusively. 



The Old Hump-Backs 

are not to be compared to our new Patent Back, flat-opening 
Blank Books, which cost not more than the old style and 
are. infinitely better. Daily Journals, Calendars, Diaries and 
Calendar Pads for 1902 at the right prices. Sanborn. Vail 
& Co., 741 Market street. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter journey across the continent. 



There are still a few people who don't know the merit 

of J. F. Cutter Whiskey, but that is because they have never- 
tried it. One trial will convince anyone that it is the best- 
flavored and purest whiskey made. It has a delicious flavor 
and leaves no bad effects. E. Martin & Co., 54 First street, 
sole agents for the United States. 



—r^— Instead of buying a new suit try the experiment of 
sending an old suit to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing 
Works, 127 Stockton street, to be cleaned and renovated. 
They achieve marvelous results. They also clean gloves, 
neckties, laces, tapestries and such articles. They call 
for and deliver goods, and do work promptly. 



SANTA JARBARA 
The finest summer climate In the State. Sea bathing 
every day In the year. The best green turf golf links 
In California; five minutes' street car ride from the 
hotel. Special low rates during the summer. 

E. P. OUNN, Proprietor. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park) 
Finest cafe In this city. 



THB very center of the city, convenient lo 
all tho hie stores and all places of amusemei t 
European plan. Ii a day and upwards. 



Milton Roblee. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

Ne w York Gity 

A Hleh Cla«s Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan nl modeiate ratts 
Acoessibly and Deliehtfully located. 
W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 

Mortimer M. KEt.LY. Manacer 




RIGGS HOUSE 

Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 

of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 0. G 
Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

PARAISO HOrSPRINGS 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 

Monterey County, Cal. C. T. Romie, Proprietor 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B, Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

An ideal spot in the Santa Oruz Mountains. Two hours 
from San Francisco. Five miles from Los Gatos. No 
tiresome stating. Delightful climate. Mineral water 
and table unsurpassed. Boating:, swimming and flshine: 
and all out-door sports. One of the best tennis courts. 
on the Coast. Entire new management. 

A. S. OLNEY, Manager. 

BALDWIN ANNEX 

CAFE AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

926-928-930 Market Street and 56 Ellis Street. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Everydelicatessen 

Domestic nnd Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 11, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 



leave] 



Feom December 6, 1901 



[abbive 



7:00 A Benlola, Sulsun, Elmlrn, and Sacramento 6:55 P 

7:00 A Vacaville. Winters. Rumaey 7:55 P 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Call at oca, Sanla Rosa... 6: 5'P 

8:00 A Davis, Woodland, KnlirhtB Landing, Maryevllle, Orovllle 7:55 P 

S:0Oa Atlantic Express, Oeden and East 8: 5 A 

8:00A Nlles. Lathrop. Stockton 7:25 p 

8:00a Niles. Mendota. Hanford. Visalla. Porterville 4:55 P 

8:30 A Shasta Express — Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Sprints), Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff, Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville. 

Marysville.Chico. Red Bluff. 4:5 p 

8:30a Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne... 4: 5 P 

9:00 a Haywards, Nlles, and war stations .11:55 A 

9:00 a Vallejo 1: 5 P 

9:00 a Los Angreles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced, FreBno, and Los Angeles 7:55 a 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 A The Overland Limited— Oerden, Denver, Omaha, Chicaeo g:5 p 

tl:00 p Sacramento River Steamers f :00 P 

3:00 p Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento. Woodland. Knlirhls Landing 

Marysvtlle, Oroville 0:i5 A 

3:30 P Haywards, Nlles, and way stations 7:55 p 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Oallstoea, Santa Rosa 9:55p 

4:00 p Nilea. Llvermore, Stockton, Lodl 1 : 5p 

4:30p Hay wards, Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore t8:55 A 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare. Bakere field, Saugus for 

5:00 p Port Costa, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton 0:5 A 

5:00 P Martinez. Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno :5 p 

6:00 P Hay wards, Nlles. and San Jose 755A 

T6:00p Vallejo :l J 

• :00p Oriental Mall— Oeden, Denver. Omaha. St, Louis. Chicaeo... 4:5 P 
7:00 P Oregon and California Express — Sacramento. MaryBville, Red- 
ding, Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p a n Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations : 5 a 

t8:05 p Vallejo 7:55 P 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). {Footof Market St.) 

8:15 A Newark, Centervtlle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations. 5:50 P 

t2:15 P Newark, Centerville. San Jose. New Almaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4 :15 P Newark, San Jobo, Los Gatos t«:50 A 

09:30 P Hunters* Train— San Jose and way stations., J7:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— t7:l5, 9:00, and 11:00 

a. m. 1:00. 3:00. 5= 15, P.M. 

From Oaklanp — Foot of Broadway,— f6:00. J8:00, t8:05. 10;00 A, u. 12:00. 
2:00, 4:00 P.M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Tuwnsend streets.) 

6:10 A San Jose and way stations 6:40 A 

7:00 A San Jose and way stations T8:00 p 

f7:00A New Almaden */4:l0 p 

8:00 A Coast Line Limited — San Jose. Gilroy. Salinas, San Luis 
Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and Principal intermedi- 
ate stations 10:45 p 

9:00 a San Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 

Luis OblBpo. and principal intermediate stations 4:10 p 

10:30 a San Jose and way stations 8:*G a 

ll^SO a San Jose and wav stations v 9:46 A 

t2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park. Palo Alto, Santa Clara.San 
Jobo, Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz, Salinas. Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove t!0:45A 

3:30 p San Jose and way stations ....... 1 :30 p 

t4:15 p San Jose and principal way stations 5:30 P 

4:50 p Sunset Limited — Mondays, Wednesdays. Fridays, for Los An- 
geles. El Paso. New Orleans and New York. Arrives Sun- 
days, Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:15 a 

T5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos. and principal way stations t9:00 a 

5:30 p San Jose and principal way stations 6:30 p 

6:30 p San Jose and way Btatlons 7:30 r 

7:00 p New Orleans Expre«s — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los 

Angeles, Demlng. El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:30 A 

oll:45 P San Joso and way stations 7:30 p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

X Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
Information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p.m., fo r 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

leaning *t Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
-trith steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. Jannary 2 1. 1902 

Doric fvla Honolulu) Saturday, February 15. 1902 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 13. 1902 

GAELIC (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 8, 1902 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 121 Market street 
Corner First. I>. D. STUBB3. G*q9t»1 Maoa ger . 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Lessees S. F. and N.P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TrnrroON Febbv — Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00, 11:00 a.m.: 12:35,3:30.5:10.6:30 P.M. Thursdays— 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:0o 9:30, 11:00 a.m.: 1:30, 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 p.m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAY8-6:10. 7:50, 9:20. 11:10 A.M.: 12:45. 3:40. 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and6:35 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10,9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.3:40 5:05, 6:25 P.M. 

Between Sau Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 



Week days I Sundays 

7:30 am x:00 am 

3:30 PM 9:30 AM 

5:10 pm I 5:00 pm 



In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 | Arrlveat San Francisco 



730 AM 

3:30 Pm 



Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa RoBa 



7:80 AM 

7:30 am 

_3:30J^m_ 

7:30 am 

5:10 pm 

7:3' 
3:3 



8:00 AM 



Fulton. Windsor, 

Healdsbure. Lytton, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 



Sundays I Week days 

10:40 am I 8:40 am 
6:05 pm 10:25 am 

7:35 Pm I t>: pm 



I 10:25 AM 
7;35 pm I 6:22 PM 



8:00 AM 



Hopland. TJklah 



8.00 AM 



8:00 am 
5:00 pm 



7135 Pm 



Guernevllle 



7:35 pm I 10:25 am 



AM 

Pm 



8:00 am 
5:00 pm 



Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 



9:15 AM 
6:06 PM 



8:40 , 



SebaBtopol 



10:40 AM 

7:35 PM 



10:35 AM 
6:22 PM 




SS _ Australia." for Tahiti. Jan. 10, '02. 10 a. m. 
SS ""\ entura,"ior Australia. Thurs. Jan. 1G. 10 a.m. 
SS Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat., Jan. 25, 2p,m: 
Line to Oooleardte, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS&BROS.CO.. 
Aeents, 043 Market Street Freleht Office. 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teamers,eaTeBroadw *!' wii > r f 

San Franoisco. 



fe| 



For Ketchikan. Juneau, Tread well 'c, Douerlae City, 
Skacway. etc., Alaska, 11 a.m.: Jan. 1. 6. 11. 16, 21. 2(5, 
31; Feb.5. Chanee to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B- C and Putjct Sound Ports. 11 a. m. Jan. 
1. 6.11. IG. 21,20.31; Feb.5. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:30 p. m. January 2. 
7. 12.17,22.27; Feb. 1. 

For San Dieco, stopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 

Los Angeles and Redondo (Los Aneeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa." Sun- 
days. 9 a.m.; Steamer "State of California." Wednesdays; 9 a. m. 

For Lob A nee lee. calllntz at Santa Cruz. Monterey. San Simeon. Cayucos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Obispo) °Gaviota, Santa Barbara. Ventura, 
Hueneme. East San Pedro. San Pedro, and 'Newport. ,*Bon,tnonly.) 

Steamer Bonlta. S a. rn., Jan. 2, 10, 18, 26; Feb- 3. Steamer Coos Bay. 9 
a. m , Jan, 6, 11, 22, 30; Feb. 7. 

For Mexican Ports, 10 a.m., 7th of each month- 

For further information obtain folders. 

Rights reserved to change steamers or sailing; dates, 

TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

G00P ALL, PERKIN S & CO.. Qen.Ag ta. 10 Market St., San Francisco 

Going East, take the 

UNION PACIFIC 



"The OVEKLAND ROUTE." carrying Un- 
united States OVERLAND MAIL 

Three through trains EVERY DAY in the Year 



'TME OVERLAND I I'll HO" 



NO CHANGE to.... 

DENVER, KANSAS CITY 
OrlAEIA, CHICAGO 

Less than 3 days to Chicago, 4 days to New York 

I>aily Tourist -ervice. Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions from °an 
Francisco Wednesdays to Omaha. St. Paul and Chicago— WITHOUT 
CHANGE. Through to Boston every Friday, 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, Gen. Agt. U. P. R. R., 
1 Montgomery Street. San Fbancisco. 

Chicago in less than 3 Days 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO AT 10 A. M. 

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buflet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la earte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Franciso o. 



Price per Copy, 10 Cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, ISM. 

t jtM rftANeiteo 



Annual Subscription, S4.00. 




(ftalif ovmVXbbtxti scv. 




Vol. LXIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 18, 1902. 



Number 3. 



The San Francisco Km Lnrsu Is printed and published every Sutures; 
Bj toe proprietor FREDERICK MARRIOTT, Hi Kearny si.. San Francisco 

Entered at San Francisco Poitofflee as second-class matter. 

The offlce of the 9. F. NEWS LETTER In London Eng., Is at SO Cornhlll 
K. C. London, England, {(Jorge Street & Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 

Chloae-o Representative— Arthur C. Quick. Room 500, Mascfe Temple 
Chios gro. 

New York Representative — C. IroDnioneer, 116 Nassau Street, New York 
Boston Representative — W. H. Daroett, 36 Broomfleld Street, Boston. 
All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 5 p.m. Thursday previous today of Issue 

Many of us are sorely disappointed that the Mayor's first 
present was a gavel instead of a baton. 



If the brigands keep lowering Miss Stone's ransom she 
will soon feel like a bargain-counter specialty. 



The new Christian Science Church in Oakland means more 
work for the officers of the Board of Health. 



Senator Hoar, in characterizing the Philippine war as "a 
painful controversy," expressed mildly what the thinking 
nation feels at large. 



Sir Thomas Lipton is already contracting for a new chal- 
lenger. Sir Thomas would be wise if he built his vessels 
on the fifty-year contract basis. 



In choosing Mr. D. O. Mills and Judge Morrow for trustees 
o: his $10,000,000 university, Mr. Andrew Carnegie did the 
right thing by California. 



The Pope has appointed a commission to answer modern 
Questions about the Bible. The News Letter predicts that 
the commission will be kept busy. 



Mr. Charles Schwab, president of the billion dollar steel 
trust, will probably find before he succeeds in breaking the 
bank at Monte Carlo that buying it would have been cheaper. 



The gentlemen of the Chicago Board of Trade who want 
the Schley-Sampson case revived by Congress evidently 
imagine the balance of our national legislation to be of small 
concern. 



If the News Letter were in the puzzle business it would 
offer prizes each week for answers as to how many revolu- 
tions there are in South America, who are revoluting, and 
why. 



By shipping short weight in quinine tablets sent to the 
Philippines, Clinton E. Worden & Co., of this city, may have 
cheated the Government, but they certainly did a great ser- 
vice to the soldiers. 



When Prince Henry is through being entertained by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and Admiral "Bob" Evans he will be able to 
return to the Kaiser and tell a thing or two about American 
strenu'osity. 



A Spaniard living in Nebraska says that he blew up the 
Maine. Perhaps he tells this story as a joke. If so, he would 
get a more sympathetic audience outside the boundaries 
of the United States. 



True to its instincts the Union Labor party has broken up 
into two factions, the Parry faction and the Delany faction. 
This, as an indication of the final dissolution of the body. 
is a hopeful sign. 



We might do well to imitate to some extent the Yuma In- 
dians, who sacrificed their medicine man because he didn't 
carry out his promise to stamp out an epidemic of small-pox. 
We could get along with half our physicians and still be sick 
enough for all ordinary purposes. 



Sybil Sanderson has gone abroad just to pronounce the 
San Francisco dramatic critics mean and horrid. If she 
would only keep still the Londoners might not know what a 
Great White Frost she scored in this city. 



The Hearst papers are trying to make Marconi revive the 
Trans-Astral telegraph fake to Mars, but if the inventive 
genius is as wise as recent events have indicated, he will 
hoot at yellow enterprises and stick to the earth. 



Complaints are being raised that the Broadway jail is 
overcrowded. If the law would be more prompt in getting 
culprits across the bay and innocent men free there would 
be no undue overcrowding in the county jail. 



If Minister Wu follows out his threat and terminates the 
commercial treaties with China — by which we are allowed 
more privileges than any other nation — we may reflect 
philosophically that we are but reaping tne logical rewards 
of Chinese exclusion. 



The "Trades and Labor Gazette," of London, in character- 
izing American workingmen the slaves of capital and say- 
ing that he is, in a political sense, the most degraded of 
creatures, shows even a more profound ignorance of Ameri- 
can institutions than English papers are generally credited 
with. 



A. Boston physician is gathering notes about Leon Czol- 
gosz, the assassin of President McKinley. and lays special 
stress on the fact that the streets in the neighborhood of 
the anarchist's home were not paved and that there were 
no shade trees. Czolgosz is probably in similar environ- 
ments now. 



The London Times claims that the obscene cartoons which 
the German papers are directing against the English are 
too insulting to be borne with equanimity. The Times de- 
clares that it is next in order to retaliate. The vengeance 
lies either with the British army or the British artists. 



"Billy" Abbott, of wide infamy, and Charles Schwartz, a 
rival in bad repute, had a quarrel in a down-town resort. 
Abbott leveled a revolver at his enemy, but the other man 
was too quick for him, and floored him with a beer glass. 
If the antagonists had aimed accurately and shot simultane- 
ously, the police would have had cause for relief. 

James Donahue, of New York, has made several hundred 
dollars delivering bogus express packages to prominent peo- 
ple, fleecing among others Lord Pauncefote, the British Am- 
bassador, to whom he delivered a common red brick and col- 
lected eighty-eight cents. The gold brick fraternity will 
probably be waiting to take him into the fold when he gets 
out of prison. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



"A VESTIBULE TO A CEMETERY." 

M. Waldeck-Rosseau, the Prime Minister of France,' was 
induced last Sunday to visit one of the hospitals of Paris. 
On his emerging from the building an immense crowd called 
upon him for a speech as to what he thought of the hospital. 
"It is not a hospital!" he cried, "it's a vestibule' to a ceme- 
tery!" One would think that he had been visiting the hos- 
pital of this city and county; to which the phrase he used 
is exceptionally fitting. Patients do not go to our so-called 
hospitals for remedial medical treatment, but to die and be 
buried with as little decency, not to say ceremony, as pos- 
sible. It is an entrance to the grave for an average of over 
two San Franciscans a day, who are done to death on coarse 
food, nursing in name only, and who may be heard almost 
any day in the year thanking God that He is about to re- 
lease their bodies from as cheerless a hovel as there is on 
this continent. "It is a disgrace to San Francisco!" exclaims 
our newly-elected workingman's Mayor, and so have all of 
our Mayors exclaimed for twenty years past. But yet noth- 
ing is done. The old wooden rookery still trembles with 
every breeze that blows, as if it were about to come down, 
and bury its wretched inmates beneath its debris. And per- 
haps that is not the worst end that can come to it, so long 
as it is an end. It is now killing its patients in a more lin- 
gering and painful way. With its rotten walls, its choken 
drains, its disgusting closets, and the hidden filth of its 
dead-house, the germs of blood poisoning are always getting 
in their deadly work. Doctors and nurses take all possible 
precautions to avoid these contaminations themselves. They 
smell aloud from the disinfectants they use, and they take 
care to spend not one unnecessary moment on the premises. 
For porters and night scullions they employ patients without 
funds, but. unhappily, possessed of an incurable disease, and 
these are given their food in exchange for all the work that 
is in them. Sufficient assistance could not be attracted to 
the hospital in any other way. It is a bad way, from many 
points of view, but it is the best the circumstances will 
permit. In very anguish of spirit we exclaim: "How long, 
oh, Lord, how long" is this state of things to be permitted 
to continue? Where are our men of civic pride, our Labor 
party, the political organizations of all parties, that they 
do not arise in their might and wipe this disgrace from the 
escutcheon of the much vaunted Queen City of the Pacific? 
For long years the Supervisors promised to add the cost of 
a new hospital to the city tax rate, and, if we remember 
rightly, they did so once or twice, but they always ended 
in getting away with the coin, just as they did the other day 
with the money to purchase St. Mary's Place. Two years 
ago the people almost unanimously voted a loan that would 
have given us a magnificent hospital, but the Supreme Court 
stepped in and found a miserable, petty little technicality in 
the proceedings that was more important in their eyes than 
the miseries of the poor and the sick. Our new Mayor says 
privately that "he will procure a new hospital or die in the 
attempt." May God speed his efforts. 



A RIDICULOUS SCREECH OWL. 

There is an old fable about a mountain which, after a 
prodigious amount of labor, brought forth a mouse. Many 
people imagine that this is a grotesque caricature of a 
human characteristic, rather than a quaint way of illustrat- 
ing a great truth. But those who are of this mind shoulu 
read the Call of last Tuesday in regard to County Clerk 
Mahoney. Anything equal to the wild vaporing of this 
paper has seldom been heard outside of a lunatic asylum. 
In circus poster type it announces that the official in question 
"signed a pledge which now subjects him to removal" by 
the Mayor, and that the latter official had promised to re- 
move Mr. Mahony from office upon proof that the charges 
are true. The charge relating to Mr. Deane is supplemented 
by the further allegation that the County Clerk borrowed 
money from a saloon keeper; that he received financial aid 
during his canvass from a firm of warrant brokers, and 
that he failed to find places for all who thought they had 
political claims upon him. If all these things were true — 
and they are, as a matter of fact, incoherent three black 
crow stories — they would not give the new Mayor the right, 
of removal. The Charter gives the Mayor authority to sus- 
pend elective officers who have been guilty of wrong doing 



in connection with their administration of their offices, but 
the power of removal rests with the Board of Supervisors. 
No one has power to either suspend or remove an elective 
municipal officer because he has borrowed money or prom- 
ised more places than he has in his gift, or even accepted 
financial aid in his campaign from the Prince of Darkness 
himself. The aim of the Charter is to establish a certain 
control over public officials during the time they are officials 
rather than to interfere with private citizens during the 
time they are seeking official station or to aid silly news- 
papers in doing kindergarten politics. When these simple 
and basic facts and principles are borne in mind it becomes 
obvious that our unesteemed contemporary on Tuesday last 
was a victim of a political mirage, and that its halucination 
led it into a very gross exhibition of journalistic blackguard- 
ism and political mud-slinging. When this was in progress, 
of course Mr. Herrin came in for a share of the abuse. A 
political assault by the Call with Mr. Herrin left out (no 
matter how disassociated with the subject he might be) 
would be like the play of "Hamlet' with the character of the 
melancholy Dane left out. But gentlemen do not conduct 
their political contentions in that way. Those are the meth- 
ods of the hoodlum. 



AS TO THE ILLEGALITY OF BOYCOTTING. 

Judge Troutt, a well-meaning but not a great judicial offi- 
cer, has just decided that the practice known as boycotting, 
in the many forms it has taken on, is entirely proper and 
legal. In doing so he has flown in the face of the recent de- 
cision of Judge Sloss in the Creamerie case. Furthermore, 
he has ignored all the recent decisions of the Federal Courts 
in this class of cases. They are numerous. Within the past 
two months the Federal Courts sitting in Milwaukee and De- 
troit have sent men to prison for disobeying the order of the 
court to cease boycotting certain premises. Judge Troutt 
was misled by the attorney for the labor unions in taking 
the libel law as the basis for his decision. That law says: 
."That every man may speak, write, and publish his senti- 
ments upon all subjects." But that law doesn't mean all 
that it is read to mean. Else any man could go up and down 
the streets speaking his "sentiments" in regard to any man 
or woman he pleases, disturbing the peace, attracting a 
crowd and practically putting an end to business. Arrests 
and punishment for using language calculated to lead to a 
breach of the peace are common. Crowds are dispersed 
whenever the police are that way minded. During the last 
Presidential campaign they were not only dispersed, but 
beaten with batons for no other crime than listening to an 
eloquent orator, and on one occasion a speaker was arrested 
because he spoke his "sentiments" in a manner the police 
did not like. They were all "obstructing the sidewalks," 
and the law was not at all in doubt. How, then, can it be 
said that a passionate, excited crowd of a not too well con- 
trolled set of workers may assemble in front of a baker's 
shop (as was the case in this instance), yell like demons, 
threaten to break up his business, which indeed was their 
object, and the law may not restrain them? Every man 
is, or ought to be, protected in the peaceful pursuit of his 
own business, and when he is not, democracies have become 
the worst of tyrannies. 



HARD TIMES IN GERMANY. 
Our rich and generous fellow-citizens of German birth have 
a grand opportunity before them just now to help the poor 
and needy of the Fatherland. It has been a hard Christmas- 
tide for hundreds of thousands of Germany's sons of toil. 
Soup kitchens and free food depots have sprung up all over 
the land. The Salvation Army is leading in this movement 
oi charity. The head of the Salvationists' work in Berlin is 
reported as saying: "Recent figures relative to the unem- 
ployed in Berlin, putting the number at 36,000, are wholly 
inaccurate. Official investigations by the city authorities 
show that 45,000 are out of work in the metal trades alone. 
Half of those counted as employed are working only half 
time. There appears no reason to doubt the figures of the 
Socialist Party that Berlin is harboring no fewer than 
100,000 workless men and women." This would appear to 
surpass our own hard times from 189S to 1895. And yet the 
world was but recently given to understand that Germany 
had beaten all her previous records in the matter of her in- 






January 13, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW3 LETTER. 



•lustrlal prosperity. Things must have coine to a soar; 
when the highest authorities In German> og to 

deprive the poor man of bis beer N i'-rson than 

v ilser Is investigating its use in the factories wltl 
purpose of suppressing It. The workmen av 
an average of a gallon a day. which not only makes them 
lethargic, but consumes much time, with the reauli 
the output of the factories is not what It ought to be. How 

'iisumption Is to be stopped is another thi.ic 
within the life-time of the present generation a successful 
revolution was started in Bavaria because of a slicht risi 
In the price of beer, which was then a Government monop- 
oly. The Bavarians could stand their king and his Lola 
Montez. but they revolted at the thought of his pleasures 
being paid for out of their pot of beer. William III should 
study that part of history. It seems a poor time for the 
agrarians to be Insisting upon higher duties on American 
food products when the Salvation Army is feeding the poor. 



OUR THREE HEROES. 
The Presidential bee is said to be busy in the bonnets of 
our three naval and military heroes. The doughty Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the United States army wants to be the 
next Democratic nominee for President of the United States, 
aid wants two far more heroic figures to run as tails to 
his kite. That is to say, he desires either Admiral Dewey 
or Admiral Schley to run as candidates on the same ticket 
with him. as candidates for the vice-Presidency. But the 
trouble with both those gentlemen is that they want to 
head tickets of their own, and it must be admitted that 
the persecution of Schley, so unjust in itself and so distaste- 
ful to the country, would make him a v°ry formidable candi- 
date. Dewey and he did the conspicuously heroic work that 
specially distinguished our late war with Spain. The coun- 
try holds them in grateful remembrance, and has every dis- 
position to exalt rather than belittle their services. But 
has the country need of fighting he-oes for Presidents, any- 
how? Have we not had enough of them? Was there ever, 
or is there ever likely to be, a good commander of men an 
equally great commander in statesmanship? Even Napoleon 
was nothing without a Talleyrand, and an English cabinet, 
with Wellington as a member, was nothing without Peel. 
History will not say that U. S. Grant, great soldier as he 
was, made the best possible President of his country. Much 
more might be said from this standpoint, but we do not 
care to pursue the subject. The best use to make of our old 
fighting men is to keep them from making fools of them- 
selves. General Sherman was right. When asked to take a 
nomination for President, he said: 'Oh, no. I am no states- 
man, iify brother John is. Take him." If General Miles, 
Admiral Dewey, and Admiral Schley were to stand off the 
politicians and say: "Take my brother," in the widest sig- 
nificance of the term, they would lessen future intrigues in 
the army and navy, and prove themselves heroes indeed. 



LEGISLATORS AT SEA ABOUT THE PHILIPPINE 
TARIFF. 

It is astonishing how far off our Solons in Washington 
are in regard to Philippine tariff matters. The other day 
members of the Finance Committee waited upon the Presi- 
dent with a proposition that American goods should be ad- 
mitted into the Philippines duty free, whilst goods from all 
other countries should be subject to tariff exactions. It 
was an astonishing proposition to emanate from a select 
committee of educated legislators, although we have seen 
the same idea .broached by the editors of some of our dailies, 
hut then one does not expect much of them. President 
Roosevelt promptly told the members of the committee 
present that their plan "was impossible." It was in viola- 
tion of the "open door" policy of this country, and of all 
others. There was no doubt the President was right, but 
he forthwith proceeded to commit as bad a blunder as the 
one he had corrected. He said: "I'll tell you what I wish 
you would do. Repeal or greatly reduce the tariff on all 
goods imported into this country from the Philippines." 
His proposition was about as "impossible" as the other. 
We are doing business with the world on the basis of "the 
most favored nation clause," and must treat all others as 
we treat ourselves. It is true, that we were allowed with- 
out protest to, enter into a little arrangement with Hawaii 



that seemed to violate this rule, hut nobody gave much heed 
to the CotnmartM of the Sandwich Islands In those days. 
Things have changed lines then Now then Is nothing mop- 
likely to azclte acute attention than the violation of a com- 

il treaty. We are certainly taking a long time to fully 
shoulder what the President was pleaaed to call "our Philip- 
pine burden." We are only securing a little more of the 
Hade of those islands than we did before the war, and Ul« 

ise Is more than accounted for by the wants of our 
own civil and military establishments. If we had kept our 
people at home, they would have added much more to local 
consumption than to our foreign exportatlons. 



THE MODOC TANGLE. 

It seems highly probable that nothing definite will come 
of the efforts to bring the Modoc lynchers to justice. The 
further the trial proceeds the worse the tangle grows, and 
the feeling that has been aroused on both sides increases 
daily in bitterness. Two men, Hutton and Morris, have 
confessed their share in the crime, accusing several 
others. The Grand Jury indicted some of them, but from all 
accounts the indictment will not hold good on account of 
obvious prejudice on the part of the members of the jury. 
The lawyers for the defense are using to an unreasonable 
extent their cross-examination privileges, with the result 
that judge, jury and spectators are really at a loss to know 
what the witnesses have told. It is an almost laughable 
fact that the jail is not large enough or strong enough to 
hold the prisoners, and the lawless element is so strong 
that it i3 hard to procure deputies to hold them. 

Worse than anything else, the judge is incapable. He is 
a fearless man, who asserts his willingness to fight the 
world, by individuals or en masse, and he is on the side of 
justice, determined to do his duty without favor or impar- 
tiality. But he is not well-groundea in the law, and has no 
dignity at all. The court room is a scene of constant squab- 
bling between the attorneys and between the judge and the 
attorneys. That "familiarity breeds contempt" is well-illus- 
trated in Alturas. It is a small community, and lawyers wno 
are in the habit of drinking with a judge or slapping him 
on the back in public cannot be brought by any ordinary 
means to a realization of respect due him in court. 

This trial should never have taken place in Modoc County. 
A change of venue was asked for, and should have been 
granted. As it was not, Governor Gage should have sent 
another judge to try the case, as was within his power. 
Some able jurist, a total stranger to all the parties con- 
cerned, would have expedited matterB, and might have suc- 
ceeded in convicting some one of the crime of hanging the 
Halls and Yantes. Legal fog and no convictions must result. 



BEAUTIFY RUSSIAN HILL. 

To lovers of the picturesque and beautiful, San Francisco's 
hills are its chief attractions, giving as they do views hardly 
excelled anywhere. Russian Hill, Telegraph Hill, Rincon 
Hill, Nob Hill, are the chief landmarks of the town, and to 
an incoming visitor they give our city an appearance of rug- 
ged beauty extremely attractive. The plans now under con- 
sideration to beautify some of these hills are laudable, 
and we hope they will meet with favor from every one. 

Russian Hill, in particular, is admirably adapted for park 
purposes. There is a full block there, bounded by Val- 
lejo, Green, Taylor and Jones streets, that is full of possi- 
bilities. It could be purchased by tee city cheaply enough— 
and certainly at a less price now than in the future. The 
view from Russian Hill is the most magnificent in town, 
embracing a panorama of the entire city. The Presidio, the 
Golden Gate and the ocean lie apparently at its feet. San 
Francisco Bay can be viewed to where it melts away in the 
southern distance. The cities across the bay, with tne 
Marin and Alameda hills in the background, and, Tamalpais 
and Diablo looming grandly up in their midst, are in 
plain view. Altogether it is ideal, and the formation of the 
hill affords all sorts of opportunities for terraces, walks and 
decoration. The air up there is fresh and pure, and it would 
soon become a favorite recreation ground. Car lines are con- 
venient, which cannot be said of Telegraph Hill, and Rus- 
sian Hill happily lacks the others' squalid surroundings. Hill- 
tops are the proper places for small parks, and San Fran- 
cisco claims no more beautiful location than Russian Hill. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



THAT SCANDALOUS TRIAL. 

There is just ended in London a scandalous trial, the 
evidence taken at whicn the press very properly refused to 
publish. The verdict of the jury, accompanied by certain 
editorial allusions to the case, were published, and decent 
people learned with no small degree of relief that the two 
wily adventurers had been convicted and sent to the peni- 
tentiary for long periods. As the Standard very discreetly 
said: "It would be a gratuitous addition to the scandal of 
an incident which has already caused pain aad offense to 
all men and women of wholesome minds if any inference 
were made to the details disclosed in the evidence or to 
dwell on the theatrical demeanor maintained to the very 
end by the female prisoner." A more profitable subject of 
contemplation than the abnormal and degenerate crimes of 
this couple is the abyssmal credulity which allowed them to 
find unwitting victims and unconscious patrons. No plum- 
met has ever yet fathomed the depth of human credulity. 
We talk of progress, the march of intellect, the advance of 
mind. But in every age, in every civilization, under all 
institutions and religions, the same depths of folly exist. 
The jargon alters, the fraud and folly remain. And in each 
age, unhappily, men and women are found, some for gain, 
others in mere thoughtless wantonness, to pander to the 
rogues that fish in those noisome depths. Fortune telling, 
hand reading, necromancy, spiritualism, astrology, and so- 
called "affinity" marriages are amonj; the devices invented to 
cike in the unwary, and their signs are emblazoned on every 
hand. One of the most successful traps set by the London 
pair was the use of marriage advertisements. Grave is the 
responsibility of those who for gain open the avenues of 
publicity, without any safeguards or guarantees to those 
who are decoyed. It almost passes comprehension that in 
these enlightened days as we are accustomed to imagine them, 
girls of average education should be so imposed upon by such 
frauds and shams as were practiced by this pair of crimi- 
nals, and frequently under the guise or form of religion. This 
unspeakable pair have had quite an American career. Two 
years ago they were ordered to get out of New Orleans 
within twenty-four hours, because of something more than a 
suspicion that they were guilty of crimes similar to those 
for which they are now under sentence, by which some of the 
leading families in the city were affected. Before that the 
woman had a prosperous career in New York as a spiritual- 
istic medium. She then held out that she was "Princess 
Editha," and declared that she was the daughter of the 
King of Bavaria and the notorious Lola Montez. She was 
ultimately detected in a series of gross frauds, and had to 
put as much space between her and New York as possible. 
The one touch of humor in the sickening business turns out 
to be the way in which she exploited and took in Mr. W. T. 
Stead, the author of the scandal known as the "Maiden's 
Tribute." Stead has already spent two months in jail 
for crimes very similar to those of this Miss de Bar. It 
Blight have been better if his sentence had been as long 
as hers. 



MR. CHAMBERLAIN DOES NOT BACK DOWN. 

There is no back down in Mr. Chamberlain's moral make- 
up. The outcry against him in the German Reichstag 
troubles him not. He repeats his words, and says it is un- 
worthy of a great nation to deny the truths of history for 
no higher or better purpose than to pick a quarrel with the 
Minister of a friendly power. He then pretty bluntly hints 
at, some further German history. He says it is not the cus- 
tom in England to get rid of Ministers of State by mere back- 
stair influences, and that ill will it fare with the independ- 
ence of the British Parliament when its responsible members 
can be frowned into silence by a foreign Minister, no mat- 
ter how high his station may be. In those few words there 
are couched about as many home thrusts as Chancellor Von 
Buelow will care to stagger under for some time. Already 
he is reeling back from the onset. Berlin says that it is 
he, and not Chamberlain, who will have to go. He has 
committed a very obvious blunder, and the Kaiser is not one 
to keep a blundering first Minister around him. Strange to 
say. the European press has turned tail, and are now as 
anti-German as they were recently anti-English. They say 
that if Mr. Chamberlain bad shrunk from maintaining his 



own words, others would have had to have done it for him. 
The truths of history, they declare, concern more nations 
than one. It should be recalled that Mr. Chamberlain did 
not apply his comparison solely and pointedly to the Franco- 
German war. He referred also to the subjugation of Poland 
and the Caucasus, to the conquest of Tonquin, and the for- 
cible occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and of course 
thereby brought Russia, France and Austria under compara- 
tive review. Why did not the speech of the British Colonial 
Minister arouse the angry displeasure of the other powers? 
Because they knew it to be true, and descriptive of a policy 
that all the great powers have to resort to occasionally. If 
it were not for Mr. Chamberlain's admiration for America, 
and love for his American wife, he might have gone on and 
included the United States in his indictment. We all know 
what is going on in the Philippines, and that it is the part 
of discretion for us to keep mum on that question. Says the 
Vicstmk Europa, perhaps the leading political magazine 
published in St. Petersburg: "It were the blackest of infam- 
ous libels to compare the conduct of the British troops in 
South Africa with that of Germans in France thirty years 
ago. The angry clamor raised in Germany against Mr. Cham- 
berlain's passing and comparative allusion has been alto- 
gether artificial, unjustifiable, and essentially hypocritical." 



SHARP WORDS PASS BETWEEN THE DOMINION 
AND THE COMMONWEALTH. 
Canada and Australia are just now getting up a little 
tempest in a tea cup in regard to their mutual relations in 
respect to tariff matters. The Parliament of the Common- 
wealth is busily engaged in passing a protective tariff that 
bears heavily on Canada's lumber trade. Of course, all 
duties, including those on articles from England, are uni- 
form. Oanada seems to think that as a British colony she 
ought to have been favored by differential duties, and, be- 
cause she has not been, has complained to the Home Govern- 
ment. Mr. Barton, the able and astute Premier of Aus- 
tralia, has responded in a document so full of acute logic 
as to be practically unanswerable. He claims that the 
Canadian Minister is ignorant of the basis of the Constitu- 
tion of his own land that knows no such thing as an appeal 
to the home country on matters of taxation. He regrets 
that a colonial Minister should be the first to take the view 
that the mother country can interfere in the internal affairs 
of the independent possessions that recognize and support 
her policy in strictly imperialistic affairs only. He pro- 
tests that Australians have shown themselves willing to 
aid Canada in all matters that do not conflict with their 
own settled policy. In evidence of that fact, he quotes the 
liberal subsidy paid to the Canadian Pacific Steamship line 
and the large bounty voted in aid of the trans-Pacific tele- 
graph line. He adds that Canada long had a protective 
system of her own, and still has one, that is largely protec- 
tive, and has thereby built up numerous industries. He 
thinks that she should not now object to Australia obtaining 
like good things by like means. He is willing to prophesy 
that it will not take Australia half the time to get those 
things tnat it did Canada. Moreover, he does not believe 
differential duties are constitutional. The most favored 
nation clause, found in all British treaties, forbids the grant- 
ing tariff favors, just as the treaties of the United States will 
stand in the way of the operation of the proposed reciprocity 
treaties. We cannot have a low tariff for one country and 
a high one for another, and for the good reason that we shall 
do no such thing. The treaties of comity between nations 
prevents it. Every one of Mr. Barton's objections seem fatal 
to the Canadian complaint. Some day Great Britain and 
the colonies may join in an Imperial Zolverein, but before 
they do, other powers, the United States, for instance, will 
have something to say about it. The British colonial mar- 
kets have grown too vast to be ignored. 



In entering a ball room Monday night President Roose- 
velt stepped on the train of his wife's dress. It takes more 
than San Juan Hill to test our Chief Executive's supreme 
courage. 



In giving a negro footpad twenty years for taking four 
dollars from a drunken sailor Judge Caroll Cook betrayed 
F truly Southern prejudice. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.I 

(14 SACR-\NENTO ST. 'PHONL MAIN 1918. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



SOLE AGENTS PACIFIC COAST FOR 
DEUTZ & CELDERMANN'S 

AT. FRANCE. 



DUFF GORDON 
SHERRY. 




DUFF CORDONI&CO. 

PORT ST. MARY'S, SPAIN. 



CHAMPAGNE 



SWAN GIN 




J.J. MEDER&ZOON, 

SCHEIDAM, HOLLAND. 




The Celebrated 

"GIBSON RYE" 





In Cases and CAsks. 

FINE OPORTO PORTS 




BOORD'S 

(LONDON, ENG.) 

OLD TOM, DRY, OR 

SLOE GINS, 

ORANGE BITTERS, Etc- 



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A. DE LUZE & FILS. 

BORDEAUX, FRANCE "WHITE HORSE CELLAR" 

SCOTCH WHISKY 
MACKIE &. CO. 

ISLAY, SCOTLAND. 



FINE CLARETS 

and 

SAUTERNES. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 




asures 



QJkoby 



Wand 

ty no wand but Treasure's 

Tom ^ioort. 




There is something doing at the Alcazar this week. 
They've a new play on, "For the White Rose;" that is, it is 
new here — it was played in Rochester, N. Y., for a week last 
year. It is a beautiful play, but there isn't a bit of sense in 
it — not an ounce. It is laid in the time of the War of the 
Roses in England, and has an Irish hero, an English heroine, 
both of whom are under the Wbite Rose flag, an Irish and 
two English villains, who are traitors to the cause of the 
snowy flower, one thrilling, surprising climax, and a scene 
from "Heartsease." 

The hero, Larry Kavanaugh (Mr. M. L. Alsop) arrives on 
the scene with dispatches to some one not clearly defined, 
which, for some unexplained reason, the villains do not "want 
him to deliver; so they tie him up, then go out and get a 
drink, preparatory to killing him at their leisure. The hero- 
ine, Rosamund Kent (Miss Marion Convere) comes strolling 
along and rescues him. They fall in love with each other 
at once. The villains come back, but Larry kills one of them 
and scares the others half to death, and Rosie takes him to 
the Earl of Warwick's castle. As the Earl hasn't yet discov- 
ered the villainy of the villains they are also inmates of the 
stronghold, and they make things warm for Larry and Rosie. 
v/ho are becoming more smitten with each other every min- 
ute. They lie to Rosie about Larry, and though they 
can't destroy her love they sort of shatter her faith. Then 
they tell her that she must lead Larry into the garden, where 
he will be captured and sent back to Ireland, threatening 
to kill him if she does not comply. He comes in at that 
moment. Two villains stand behind him. one with sword 
drawn, the other with a knife poised over his shoulder, and 
blandly suggest that he go into the garden with Rosie. 
pantomiming to her meanwhile that she'd better be a good 
girl and do as she's told. Rosie appears to assent, steps 
forward, then suddenly jumps between Larry and the vil- 
lains and screams "treachery!" Wow! There's trouble 
then! Larry jumps into the corner, Rosie with him, pulls 
his sword and does the "Come one, come all" act. The 
Earl comes in just then, and is satisfied with Larry's ex- 
planation that they're "just having a bit of a time." It's a 
stirring climax. Then they leave Larry to himself, but trap 
him by locking all the doors but one, through which Rosie 
comes and tells him that the villains intend to come and 
kill him, making their entrance through the window by 
means of a ladder. Larry agrees to escape if Rosie will 
take to the woods with him. She consents and goes out 
to pack up. Then ensues a scene like that in "Huckleberry 
Finn," where Tom and Huck lead the nigger out of the 
smokehouse to perfect arrangements for his escape from it. 
Larry, instead of going out the door with Rosie, lets the vil- 
lains climb in at the window, ne meanwhile hiding behind 
a curtain, then goes down the ladder by which they came up. 
pausing long enough to give them the "ha, ha," and takes 
the ladder away. They, as well as Larry, seem blind to the 
fact that they might go out by the door through which 
Rosie came and went. 

Well, the persecuted ones get away to the tall timber, 
where Larry is captured by the villains, one of whom he 
badly punctures, and is about to be hanged when the Earl 
drifts along and rescues him. 

It is in the woods that the famous Heartsease scene is 
used. Rosie leaves Larry for a time, and he foolishly prom- 
ises not to fight until she returns. There's a little sense in 
the Heartsease affair, because there the hero simply prom- 
ises not to fight a duel, but Larry even vows not to draw 
even in self defense. He is sorely tried, and Rosie gets there 
just in time to keep him from breaking his vow. Then she 
absolves him, and he doesn't do a thing to the villain. 

Mr. Alsop is pretty much of a failure as Larry. He does 
many things extremely well, and one would think that 
he would be an ideal dare-devil Irishman. But he is very 
tame, is hampered by self-consciousness, and forgets his dia- 
lect about two-thirds of the time. Mr. George Osborne, who 



plays the evil Hibernian, Hugh Kitel, is very much better — 
is extremely good, in fact. Mr. Howard Scott, who takes the 
part of Edmund Ball, labors under the disadvantage of be- 
ing exterminated in the first act, so doesn't get much of a 
chance. Mr. Frank Bacon, as Simple Peter, has a good 
chance, which he takes little advantage of. I opine that he 
has a good part in the next play, and is saving himself for it. 
Miss Convere makes a very sweet and lovable Rosamund, 
and looks better than she acts — and she doesn't act at all 
badly, either. Miss WaUlorp is a graceful and charming 



Dorothy. 



_ .jit 



The three Faust sisters at the Orpheum are dancers. They 
dress in green, carry green sunshades, and wear red hair. 
Their resemblance to each other leaves no room for doubt 
as to their relationship, though there is much to create the 
suspicion that one is the mother and the others daughters. 
It would be ungallant to designate the suspected one. The 
Jaust sisters are lithe, sinuous and serpentine. Their 
movements are graceful and apparently without effort. There 
is nothing sensational in their work, but it is restful in its 
effect. They seem to drift aimlessly along, the dance doing 
itself of its own accord, and leaving them totally serene and 
undisturbed. They vary their turn by a little floor-sprawling, 
merely an exhibition of acrobatics, contortion and anatomy. 

Kara the Great is the best juggler that ever followed the 
circuit, and is always welcomed by the Orpheum patrons. 
His dexterity is wizard-like, and he plavs battle-door and 
shuttlecock with everything except the footlights and the 
scenery, he was a little off-color Wednesday night, missing 
a few of the billiard balls and bruising his lip with a big 
table that he was dancing over his features, all of which 
brought forth a savage Teutonic scowl. But this was merely 
a demonstration of the fact that he is really a human being 
— a fact which some of his tricks cause one to doubt. 

Mr. Alt Holt, the whistler and mimetic comedian, is a good 
entertainer. Buckner, the trick bicyclist, has, impossible 
as it may seem, a lot of new feats on the wheel, which he 
rides in all sorts of positions. 

* * * 

The small audience that assembled at the Columbia 
Monday night didn't expect much of a "Macbeth" after last 
week's rather tame presentation of "Henry VIII." But it 
was better than they had looked for — very nearly satisfac- 
tory in most respects, and in one or two scenes coming up 
to all traditions. For one thing, it was magnificently staged, 
the banquet scene in particular being a lavish display of 
the scenic artist and property man's talents. Madam Mod- 
jfska and Mr. James wore robes in this act that were truly 
royal in their magnificence and richness, and the others in 
the cast were adequately costumed. Then the martial music 
behind the scenes — brass and drums and fifes — was gay, 
war-like and inspiriting, gory in its suggestions. 

Mr. James makes a far better Macbeth than he does a 
Cardinal Wolsey. The Cardinal is too subtle a part for 
him — too full of suggestive action, fine shades of expression 
and intonation, and other delicacies of histrionic art to which 
he cannot rise. The part of Macbeth is full of straight 
away, vigorous acting — and Mr. James is nothing if not vig- 
orous. And let it be said to his credit that he does not 
rant through it — he is merely legitimately noisy and strenu- 
ous. 

Mr. Norman Hackett was surprisingly good as Macduff, 
carrying off a large share of the honors of the evening. 
His announcement of the death of the king and the arousal 
of the household was particularly good, only he didn't 
dare batter the unsubstantial settings hard enough with 
his sword to match the vigor of his words and actions. 
Grief at the death of his wife and children was well simu- 
lated, showing capabilities that promise to ripen with age 
into the stuff that stars are made of. 

Madam Modjeska's Lady Macbeth fills one with a desire 
to have seen her play it ten years ago. 
* • • 

Leader Steindorff put on the soft pedal in selecting the 
numbers for his symphony concert Friday afternoon of last 
week, giving us music nearly all light, fairy, fleeting. This ' 
second concert under his leadership was better than the first, [ 
showing a greater precision, more grasp, breadth and unanl-l 
mity than in the first concert. The autjience, too. was an* 



Jonu-iry 18. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



:ii In the manor of slxo ov« the first, and wm 
his In l(« appreciation of lh.- musicians . rr 

nirc." thv opening number, li ■ llti 
leasing in that it made enjoyment i 
numbers more keen Wallhera Prize Song 
rsinger was the second on the programs 
a ready response in the audience. Verj Uttli 
could be found with Its presentation. 

The scherzo movement of Mendelssohn's "Midsummei 
Night's Dream" was beautifully executed. It Is full of 
icj music, rippling movements and dalnt] 
dies. It brought forth an encore. 

The last number was Beethoven's C minor Symphony, 
Number 5. It is one of the most ambitious things Mr, 
dorff has yet attempted, and was played in a most creditable 
manner. \y. j, \v. 



A second series of symphony concerts will be given at 
the Grand Opera House under the auspices of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Society. They will take place on the after 
noons of January 31st and February 14th and 28th. Among 
the numbers to be produced under Leader Steindorff's 
baton aro the Dvorak New World; a Schumann number, D 
minor; MacDowell. Indian Suite; Victor Herbert, Suite Fan- 
tastinue, first time here; Lalo. Rhapsodie; and Olinka's 
overture, "The Life of the Czar." The sale of seats win 
begin at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Monday. Prices for the 
series from $1.25 to $3.50. 

• * * 

On Monday evening the Tivoli will present "The Toy 
Maker" with the same cast as when it was put on last sum- 
mer, including Messrs. Hartman, Fogarty, Cashman, Cunning- 
ham, Webb, Annie Myers, and tne rest. Miss Anna Lich- 
ter will arrive from ths East next week, and "The Ameer" 
will be given on January 27th. There will be a toy matinee 
for the children next Saturday. 

• * * 

"For the White Rose," the romantic drama that had its 
initial San Francisco production at ine Alcazar this week, 
will be continued next week with the same cast. "The Dan- 
ites" will follow. 

• * • 

The Da Coma family, acrobats, will be seen at the Or- 
pheum next week. The Taylor sisters are trick and fancy 
skaters. Ada Arnoldson is a Swedish singer with a contralto 
voice; Kara, the juggler, has a new act, and the Faust sis- 
ters will change their dance. The other holdovers are 
Buckner, the bicyclist, Jacques Inauda, the mathematician, 
and the biograph. 

• * * 

Next Monday night the Kirke Sheile Opera Company will 
commonce an engagement, presenting the comic opera, "The 
Princess Chic." Margaret Sylvian is the star, and the 
soubrette is Edna Floyd. There is a quartette of comedians, 
composed of Messrs. Edward S. Metcalf, Walter A. Lau- 
rence, Thomas C. Leary, and Neil McNeil. 

• • • 

Mr. Josef Hoffman, the pianist, will give two recitals at 
the Columbia Theatre on Tuesday afternoon, January 28th, 
and Friday afternoon, January 31st. The advance sale of 
seats opens at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s next Monday morning. 
Prices, ?2, $1.50, $1.00 and 50 cents. 



Mr. William Lee Greenleaf, the monologist, is making a 
very successful tour of the Bay Counties circuit, giving his 
■ Bill Nye and James Whitcomb Riley lectures. 



-Does your dealer keep " 
Jessie Moore Whiskey? 
If not, Insist on his 
Getting it for you. 
The finest in the world. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty. " Colton Gas" for painless teeth extracting 



Lunch and dinner, 50 cents, at Felix's Rotlsserie. 537 California street, be 
ow Kearny: Sunday dinner, 75?. Best French restaurant in town 



Amekcian Dispensary. 514 Pine street, above Kearney. 



Although Doyen Champagne, '93, was made in 1893, 

one of the best vintage years ever known among wine men, 
it sells for the price of ordinary champagne. 



Alcazar Theatre. * mM * T " u *2SV& ~ 

trti Bomanth 

FOR THE WHITE ROSE 

Thr Ur*i lime OH Ibl I'*- Ml I i Dw Iftrtd !•■ b« Ihfl srreale*. plur 

e\er written on ibr nuv «>f < Mvalry. 

ItcguUr Matinee ftoftordajr ■IMS Hiindny. H« • lire »ca!i» in advance bv 

phoning^ li. .v nfli< o, Main 2M. 

I'm. m, ISO, 2V. Me. 50o ami 790, 



Columbia Theatre. " OTT ""' ES-*.^ «.„«.„. 

Beginning Next Monday. January 3D. Every night, including Sun- 
day. MatinM SiHurHny. 

KIRK La SHELLE OPERA COMPANY 

in the Merry Mu*icnl Jmioccbs, 

TME PRINCESS CHIC 

A Superb Open. Combine. 

Prices— $1.50. 8i. 75o. SOc, 35o and 25c. 

Grand Opera House. — SPECIAL 

Friday Afternoons, Jan. 31. Feb. 14 and 38. SECOND SERIES 

THREE SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
under the auspices of the 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 
Paul Steindobff, Director. 
GlULlo Minetti, ConeertraelBter. Orohestra of Fifty-live musicians. 
Subscription Price for Series, 83.50, $2.25, $1 .75 and $1.25. S tie opens 
at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s Monday, January 2oth, at 9 a. m., and closes 
Saturday, February IStli, at 5 p. in. Seats for single concerts, $1.60, 
31.00, 75c and 50o. 

T!./~li n««»--. H«..«^ Mse. Ernestine Krkling. 
I V O II U Dera n O USe . Proprietor and Manaeer. 

Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp I 
To-night and to-morrow night. Last of 

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD 

Monday, January 20th— The Famous Hit! 

THE TOY MAKER 

Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Orpheum 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, January 19. 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



DA COMA FAMILY; Taylor Twin Sisters; Ada Arnoldson: KARA 
THE uReAT, Mr- and Mrs. Gardner Crane; Three Faust Sisters; 
Arthur Buckner; The Biograph, and Last Appearances of cJACQUEa 
INAUDI. 

Reserved seats, 25c; Balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats, SOc. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 




RAGING 



EVERY WEEK DAY, RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m- sharp. 

Ferryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1. 1:30 2:30 and 3 p. m., 
connecting with trains stopping at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferry ickets to Shell Mound. Last two oars on train reserved for ladies 
and their escorts, No smoking. All trains via Oakland Mole connect with 
San Pablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadwayi Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue electric cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric ears go direct to ihe 
track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning— Trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 p. m, and Immediately 
after the last race. 

THOMAS H, WILLIAMS, Jr., President. 

R. B. MtLROY. Secretary. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is soolety's gathering place after the theatre 
is over 

C. F. MATTHEWS, D.D.S.. Manager 

MATTHEWS DENTAL CO. 

SPECIALTY: CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 

128 Powell Street. 

Phone Red 2714 San Franolsco 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 




Library&abk 



som:-?- 



m 



_ 




When Mr. Crawford writes a new story with 

Marietta. Italy for its setting, we feel like exclaiming, 
with Mr. Dooley: "Praise be!" Its legends, 
its poetry, its history, its enchantments are all his own, and 
in "Marietta, A Maid of Venice," he gives some vivid pic- 
tures of Hie in Venice in the Middle Ages. The story is 
historically true, and is taken from a pamphlet entitled 
"LArte del Vetro in Murano." Its action and interest cen- 
ter in the household of a master glass-blower, a member of 
one of the most powerful Venetian trade corporations 
which had many rights and curious privileges. The glass- 
blowers were a sort of nobility, and patricians of Venice 
rfarried the daughters of glass-workers without affecting 
their own rank or that of their children. Old Angelo Bero- 
viero, very rich and one of the greatest living artists in 
working glass, has an only daughter, Marietta, for whom ne 
has planned a great match. Lord Jacopo Contarini is will- 
ing to barter his name for the munificent dowry that goes 
with the glass-worker's daughter, but Marietta has ideas 
of her own about marriage, defies customs and traditions, 
and asserts her right to be free to love and live like every liv- 
ing creature God ever made. Her heart has gone out to 
Zorzi, a Dalmatian waif, who has been long in her father's 
service, and who has learned to be a skillful worker in glass, 
but is barred out from the privileges that would have ac- 
crued to him as a Venetian because he is a foreigner by 
birth. The love of these two young people, their trials and 
tribulations, and the final fulfillment of their hearts' de- 
sire, make up a story so human that it takes a strong hold 
on the mind of the reader. Nothing more charming has ever 
been written than the description of the unfolding of 
Marietta's love for Zorzi, the delicate revelation of that 
love, and her efforts to make him tell her that he loves her. 
Although ho loves her with all his heart, and would give 
every hope he has for the pressure of her hand in his, he 
dare not reveal his passion, and that he should dream of 
winning Marietta for his wife is something too absurd to 
contemplate, he reasons with himself. But love itself does 
not reason, and at last these two, so honest, so earnest in 
their affections, find the happiness which is akin to that 
peace which passeth all understanding. Mr. Crawford's 
pen draws deft sketches of Saint Mark's and the buildings on 
the Guidecca, the gondolas, the songs of the boatmen, 
and Venice — the Queen of the Adriatic — all light and color 
and splendor, but it is as a love story, idyllic and full of 
charm, that Marietta will be best remembered. 

The Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 51.50. 
The name of Mr. George F. Cram 

Minette: A Story of is widely known for, for three de- 
the First Crusade. cades or more, he has been a suc- 
cessful and prolific publisher of 
maps and atlases of all kinds. For the first time his name 
now appears on the title-page of a book as author, 
under the title "Minette: A Story of the First Cru- 
sade." Mr. Cram has written a spirited romance 
which ends with the capture of the Holy City from the Sara- 
cens. A love story full of deep pathos runs through it. The 
style is dramatic and the interest exceedingly well main- 
tained, and Mr. Cram is to be congratulated upon having 
very deftly mingled history and romance into an unconven. 
tional story, the characters of which seem very real. The 
book is handsomely bound, and has an appropriate cover de- 
sign and numerous illustrations. 

John W. Iliff & Co., Publishers, Chicago. Price, $1.50. 

Richard Longsword is the hero of Mr. 

God Wills It. William Stearns Davis' tale of the First 
Crusade. "God Wills It," and around the 
adventures of this redoubtable young Norman cavalier, set- 
tled in Sicily, the story revolves. He rescues a Byzantine 
Princess, Lady Mary Kurkuas, from a robber band, and in 
time wins her heart and hand. The news that his grand- 



father is nigh unto death in France calls him from her side. 
On arriving at his destination he finds his grandfather dying 
and learns that an old-time enemy, De Valmont, has blinded 
him. He seeks vengeance, attacks the castle of the de Val- 
n'ont's, and kills the young Gilbert de Valmont. Overcome 
by remorse, he swears to go to Jerusalem. Mr. Davis has 
depicted admirably the great gathering of the nobles anl 
people to hear the Pope preach the Crusade. In Syria, 
Richard Longsword's rival in love steals from him his 
bride, but at the storming of Jerusalem by the French he 
ivgains her under most romantic circumstances. With the 
time when the name of Jerusalem was a talisman for every 
mortal woe, when "God Wills It," the cry of the Crusader 
was on every tongue, when young and old swelled with holy 
rage against the infidel, when lands, fame, home, friends, 
love, were all put by in order to draw forth the sword and 
go forward, Mr. Davis is evidently very familiar. He writes 
not only with dramatic power, but with keen appreciation 
of the historic importance in fiction of those stirring events 
which made memorable the eleventh century. 

The Macmillan Co., Publishers, l\ew York. Price, $1.50. 
Charles Henry Webb, who is per- 
With Lead and Line. haps better known under his pen- 
name of John Paul, has recently 
issued a little book of poems entitled "With Lead and Line 
Along Varying Shores." He writes in a natural, bright, 
spontaneous manner, and is a witty, as well as a versatile, 
singer. The present collection includes not only humorous 
verse, but vers^esocieU, and many sweet and tender lines, 
as, may be seen by the following pair of quatrains: 

Love is a day 

With no thought of morrow, 
Love is a joy 

With no thought of sorrow. 

Love is to give 

With no thought of receiving, 
Love is to trust — 

Without quite believing. 

Surely no truer definition of love was ever given. To those 
who appreciate good poetry, dainty humor and tender feel- 
ing, we can conscientiously commend Mr. Webb's latest 
volume of verse, for it is the work of a rare nature, who 
"from his heart 
Pours Poesy's choicest wine." 

Houghton, Mifllin & Co., Publishers, Boston and New 
York. Price, $1.10. 

Struggle, sacrifice, and sword, play no 

St. Nazarius. small part in Mrs. A. C. Farquharson's 
recent novel, 'St. Nazarius." It deals 
with the so-called Platonic affection of a young man who 
is destined to the priesthood, and with his loyalty to his 
cousin, when he finds that they have both set their affec- 
tions upon the same woman. The monastery of St. Nazar- 
ius is in the heart of a deep forest surrounding the castle 
.of Oldenburg, therefore the reader may surmise that the 
scene is laid in Germany, but of local color there is little, 
and the characters are quite as shadowy as the setting. In- 
deed, at times it is rather difficult to follow the author's 
meaning, and one lays down the book with a vague sense 
of unreality and disappointment. 

The Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 



Books Received. — A. M. Robertson: "In the Footprints 
of the Padres," by Charles Warren Stoddard, price, $1.50. 

Neale Publishing Co. — "The Goldsmith of Nome," by Sam 
C. Dunham, price, $1.00. 

The Stanley-Taylor Co. — "From Fair Hawaiiland," by P. 
Maurice McMahon. 

The Macmillan Co.— "Topical Discussion of Geography," 
by W. C. Doub, price, 25 cents. 

MARY E. BTJCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 126 



Post Street 



January 18. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



UA 



CTchti Crier j 

- - > '.rtat th* dttil art /tat ' *._^g] 

'OBt t\lt Wltptdf t** dr. • - p. ",i?u ' 




Oh. Senator Hoar has raised a great roar 

About the vile Anarchists sen! to nur shore. 

He wants thi-m all shipped to some sea-begirt pile 

To stand In the atlas as Anarchy Isle. 

Anarchy Isle. Anarchy Isle. 

To stand in the atlas as Anarchy Isle. 

Where the Isle is located it hasn't been stated 
Perhaps it Is yet to be found or created. 
But It will not be long till the Anarchists file 
To the dangerous precincts of Anarchy Isle — 
Anarchy Isle, Anarchy Isle, 
To the dangerous precincts of Anarchy Isle. 

There the Anarch at will can slaughter and kill 

And there his degenerate destiny flu, 

With the logical sequence tnat after awhile 

There won't be an Anarch on Anarchy Isle — 

Anarchy Isle. Anarchy Isle, 

There won't be an Anarch on Anarchy isle. 

Trance clairvoyance, palmistry, fortune-telling, and parlor 
magic may no longer be regarded as mere catch-penny 
trades since Sir Henry Prichard (sir Henry, if you please!) 
has gracefully descended from his seat in the peerage and 
deigned to take out full-page advertisements in the even- 
ing papers, describing himself as "Eminent Psychist. Palm- 
ist and Trance-Clairvoyant, direct from Cecil Hotel. London, 
England." Brewing, I learn from various books on peer- 
age, first became respectable when it was pursued by those 
bearing titles. And now the next trade to become decent 
through the magic touch of the aristocrat is clairvoyance. 
God wot, it has needed something to make it respectable. 
Now will Ismar the Gypsy be good? Mow will Sir Harry 
Westwood Cooper promise to reform? "As a test Sir Henry 
will tell you your full name, etc.," the advertisement prom- 
ises in closing. That is very obliging of the nobleman, but 
1 for one would feel more relieved if he would reveal his 
own full name "as a test." 

Another faker, as picturesque, if less aristocratic than 
the mediumistic Sir Henry, "late of the Hotel Cecil, London, 
Eng.," is Professor Paul Poze Plato of San Jose. I have kept 
my eye on this ungainly charlatan for some time past, and 
I am now coming to the conclusion that the time is approach- 
ing when he should be stopped by the police. He goes 
abroad clad in a costume that is a cross between a night- 
mare and an Orpheum skit. His graft is the advancement of 
the human race. A few months ago he had published a 
pamphlet in phonetic spelling, and accompanied by a por- 
trait of himself which ought to have sent him to Agnews 
or San Quentin. His latest project is a railroad to belt 
the continent and to be paid for at several hundred dollars 
per share. If the Professor fails to rake in the shares he 
keeps the stamps sent by the credulous. (Every little helps, 
you know.) When this modern Plato is a crank he is amus- 
ing or nauseating, as the case may be, but as soon as he 
becomes a swindler, it is time for the majesty of the law to 
step in. 

Perhaps the witnesses for Mrs. Reeves Atkinson are tell- 
ing the truth when they declare in court that it was a par- 
rot that made all the screams that emanated night and day 
from the ill-omened Sutter-street institution. Perhaps, 1 
repeat, it was a parrot, out if so it was a rara avis indeed. 
Strange bird to have bruised and maimed so many of the 
patients sent to the sanitarium for treatment! Maybe it 
was because of the parrot and its rude ways that stark 
bodies were hurried down the stairways into the dead wagon 
before the false dawn should betray the ghastly work. Per- 
haps, I repeat, it was the parrot that did all these things — 
if so, Mrs. Reeves Atkinson ought to be sent to jail for keep- 
ing such an inhuman bird. 



"Foltom PrfSOfl i than Bll I Mr 

•"hurl' minbly n 

i and a member of the California Prison Commission, 
in addressing the Men's League In tie- Uollj P 
Church this week. If what Mr. Montgomi true, 

'tis pliy. but it is my personal belief that ti. ommli 

never been to Siberia. .\,r. Montgomery is tak- 
ing around with him an ex-convlcl lecturer named King, who 
to be making a good living convincing the public 
that released Jail-birds ought to be received into the 
of the higher professions instead of being treated ai 

with more past than future. Now, this Is all Tommyrot. 
Even if Tolsom prison is a Siberia (which it is not i the 
Crier for one is not going to shed any tears over the fate 
of the man who sandbags him for a living. California's 
prisons are the most home-like and high-toned in the world, 
and as a consequence plug-uglies and thugs flock to our 
shores for the purpose of getting in on the rival Paradises 
a' Folsom and San Quentin. 

I hate a knocker — and San Francisco gives me plenty of 
opportunity to indulge my feeling. If there is any one thing 
more than another that keeps our city back it is the fault- 
finding, back-biting spirit that prevails. The continued at- 
tacks being made upon Mr. William Bunker by the Evening 
Post is a case in point. Mr. Bunker was sent to Washington 
by the Chamber of Commerce to represent the Pacific Coast 
'lining the present session of Congress. We have all sorts 
o! interests that needed looking after, and from the re- 
ports that come Mr. Bunker is representing us in a more 
than satisfactory manner. Yet the Post lampoons him stead- 
ily. Do you know why? A few years ago Mr. Bunker was 
proprietor of the Report, an evening paper, and of course a 
business rival of the Post. The Post has not forgiven him 
that horrible crime, and never loses an opportunity to 
abuse him. It is for no other reason that it is trying it3 
best to counteract the good work he is doing in Washington. 
If you will tell me of a cheaper motive for abuse I will eat 
a copy of the Post. I would make the forfeit greater if I 
could think of any worse penalty. 

Every once in a while the Board of Supervisors does some 
foolish, parsimonious trick that causes me to wonder what 
on earth we elect them for. One of their latest moves in 
this line is refusing to pay a ? 10,000 bill of Gray Bros., who 
have the contract to clean our streets, some busybody in- 
terfering and claiming that they have not been doing the 
work according to contract. I, for one, know that I have 
swallowed less dirt and street filth since Gray Bros, have 
been cleaning our thoroughfares than during any time in 
my career, and others have had the same experience. If 
the Board of Supervisors' record was as clean as our streets 
have been lately we would have a far more decent city 
government. , 

Why doesn't Mr. Andrew Carnegie get liberal and give the 
quiet town of Oakland a decent jail? Penology is not my 
specialty, but it occurs to me that an ideal prison is a place 
where men may be kept as long as the law sees fit. In the 
last month or so there has been about seven wholesale jail 
deliveries, and the escape of three burglars from Oakland's 
rickety donjon-keep on Tuesday night was so small a mat- 
ter as to hardly awaken a languid interest on the part of the 
dozing citizens. Instead of the conventional "All Hope 
Abandon Ye who Enter Here," the Oakland jail bears the 
gilded legend "Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make, Nor Iron 
Bars a Cage." If I were a burglar I would certainly set up 
shop in Oakland. 

I confess much surprise at the action of the four Sutro 
heirs, who are trying to further tangle up the settlement of 
that long-litigated estate by putting forth the claim that 
Adolph Sutro was insane in 1882 when he made the will 
they are disputing. It shows the weakness of their contest. 
Whatever Sutro may have been just previous to his death, 
anyone who knows anything about him will testify to his 
perfect sanity in 1882. There was not a Keener, shrewder 
business man in San Francisco. I am afraid this quartette 
ot will smashers will have to bring forward something besides 
insanity if they want to increase their share of the Sutro 
millions. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 




Upon a nickel telephone 

A little microbe sat. 
"Alas!" said he, "they're after me — 

Now, whot d'ye think o' that? 

"They've chased me from the paving stones, 

They've chased me from the sink. 
They've done me brown in Chinatown — 
At least, that's what they think. 

"And now here comes the Board of Health 

To catch me here alone. 
And sprinkle Anti-Microbe Juice 
Upon the telephone." 
* • • 

People are wondering just now how long the Mayor 
is going to permit Mr. Ruef to prepare his speeches for him, 
and tell him what to do. The reporters are constantly 
amused by hearing Mayor Schmitz publicly reproved or re- 
buked, as the occasion demands, by the new Warwick. 
Tuesday morning the ofQcers of the French cruiser Protet 
paid an official visit to Mayor Schmitz. The reporters were 
given a view of the dress rehearsal for the reception. Mr. 
Ruef said to the Mayor: 

"Now, seat the Commander there." Mr. Schmitz boweu. 
"Then you take your seat here." 

Mr. Schmitz did as he was bid, although he squirmed a 
little. 

"Then," went on the maker of great men, "after we sha.l 
have talked a certain length of time vou arise and drinn 
to the health of the Commandant. If I were you I should 
net attempt French. Of course, if I were Mayor, I could 
give a French speech, but you would better say something 
as follows." 

Then Mr. Reuf composed a speech on the spur of the 
moment, and asked Mr. Schmitz to repeat it after him. The 
Mayor did so. It was a very excellent speech, for Mr. Ruef 
is constantly in practice, as the Mayor has many speeches 
to make, but it is doubtful if he will ever acquire Mr. Phelan's 
skill. The ex-Mayor is said to be the readiest speaker in 
the State. 

• • * 

General Hughes, who has just returned from the Philip- 
pines after a long stay, will tell you that a simple private 
on sentry duty is, for the time being, a greater man than 
the wearer of stars. And he learned this from an Irish pri- 
vate of the volunteers. 

The soldier was guardian over a captured Spanish store- 
house, and he had orders to pass no one without a special 
order from the Provost-Marshal of Manila, which position 
General Hughes at that time held. When the Provost-Mar- 
shall drew near the store-house he became suddenly aware 
that if he persisted in moving forward he would impale him- 
self on a triangular Springfield bayonet. 

"Halt!" cried a voice in rich brogue. "You can't go in 
there." 

"Why not?" asked the General. 

"Niver mind," replied the private. "I know me orders. 
You can't go in there without a pass from the Provost-Mar- 
shal." 

"But I'm the Provost-Marshal myself," said General 
Hughes. 

"I don't care if you're the President. Divil a foot do you set 
inside till you show me a pass." 

The General smiled, and drawing a memorandum from his 
pocket scribbled a few lines on a leaf. He handed this to the 
sentry. 

"Very well, sor," said the private when he had carefully 
perused the pass. "But why the divil didn't you do that ip 
the first place?" 



On the other side of the pond Mr. John W. Mackay is 
much more talked of than in America. The newspapers of 
London and Paris give a good deal of space to the sayings 
and doings of Mr. Mackay and his wife. The latter, who 
is the leader of the American colony in the French capital, 
is always put down as a typical American, while Mr. Mackay 
is hailed as a character from Bret Harte or Mark Twain. A 
Londoner writes as follows: 

"When Christmas time comes John Mackay always begins 
to think of all his old associates who have not done well In 
the world, and who look forward to his helping them al- 
ways at this period of the year. And then he goes over the 
list with one of his confidants, and this is something like the 
conversation : 

"'Poor Bill Adams! Put him down for five hundred dol- 
lars — Bill is a good fellow.' 

"A pause. 'Say, I wonder if Bill is still as fond as he used 
to be of a drop of whiskey? Yes, I daresay he is, and he'll 
certainly get rid of that five hundred on a bit of a spree, and 
then he'll have nothing. Put him down for another five 
hunt] red dollars.' 

" 'There's Jack Hynes. Jack is a good fellow; he ought to 
have done better; put Jack down for five hundred.' 

"Another pause. 'But Jack's dreadfully weak about the 
girls; he's sure to spend that five hundred dollars on some 
petticoat that has caught his fancy. Yes — put him down for 
another five hundred dollars.' 

"I know only one person as kind-hearted as Mr. Mackay, 
and that's his wife — that vivacious, fiery, pretty little 
woman, with her vehement affections and her strong dis- 
likes and her inflexible staunchness in friendship. The 
other day she offered by telegram to come over all the way 
from Paris to nurse a countrywoman, whose name the 
reader can guess." 

• • * 

According to the exclusionists the Chinese are an unpro- 
gressive race, but the younger Americanized generation of 
our Chinese quarter are anything but behind the times. Som • 
few weeks ago Editor Shew of the Chinese daily in this city 
went on a lecture tour through some of the Eastern. States, 
and with him went a Chinese male quartette from the 
Young Men's Club here. The members of the quartette 
are fine looking chaps, sons of merchants of the better class, 
and in their occidental costumes they present a very natty 
appearance. Young Low, whose father is a well-to-do mer- 
chant, sings a very sweet tenor, and the quartette as a 
whole makes good music. And now I hear that the lecturer 
and the warblers are returning home with more experience 
than cash, for a lack of proper business methods stalled the 
travelers in many Eastern cities where the turn might have 
been made a sensational success. When Mr. Shew and his 
musicians go forth again I hope they will take with them 
a business manager who understands the importance of the 
Great American Ad. 



This cold weather revives the memory of a good story 
on Mr. Arthur McEwen, one of the best newspaper men 
San Francisco ever turned out, and who is now lending 
brilliance to the columns of Eastern papers. Mr. McEwen 
is very fond of telling the story on himself, so I am violat- 
ing no confidences in repeating it. 

It happened in early days, before Mr. McEwen's abilities 
became well known enough to entitle him to a large salary. 
He and several other reporters and writers, in various stages 
of impecuniousness, had rooms in a hi use out in the Latin 
Quarter. The top floor was occupied by an eccentric million- 
aire, who, for reasons of his own, elected to live in semi- 
obscurity. 

One cold winter night there was desolation in the quar- 
ters of the Bohemians. There was no coal in the hopper. 
A consultation was held and Mr. McEwen said: 

"Boys, for to-night I'm a Socialist. That plutocrat up-stalrs 
has a big bin full of coal. I'll bet a whole car-load of him 
wouldn't have as much brains as one of us. and here we are 
freezing to death, while he's reveling in coal. I'm going to 
go up. pick the lock and get some of it." 

The others were glad to assent to a scheme in which 
some one else took all the risk, so Mr. McEwen took the ho.l 
and tramped upstairs on his burglarious errand. He had 



January tS, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISO' NEWS LETTER 



no tn tb.' i «iil Inn, which stood in the ball 

■ millionaire's door, «r In Dlllng tbi 
igratulntlng him.- If on his link, whi 
. of the bod being overfull, a lump Jroppi.il to t ) • - 
with a tremwdoi li- held hi* breath Hi 

a step, a knob turning, and the tnllllonaii' 

atcBwen stood frozen with terror. The othi i 
up his Inuip, turned it full upon the culprit for a moment, 
led him critically, then Btepped hark into his room 
and shut the door. 

One night then- was an Immense banquet, 
dej by all the big men of the town. Mr. McBwen, who 
while had climbed into public notice, was sent to report 
I: After the feast was over he was taken around and Intro- 
; to some of the prominent men. He was going through 
It all swimmingly, his ready conversational powers smooth- 
he way for him, when to his horror he noticed that hi 
was being led up to the man from whom he had filched the 
Wild thoughts of flight darted through his brain, but 
it was too late. He was led up to the sacrifice, and the 
iduction was made. 
"Ah. I have met Mr. McEwen before/' remarked the pluto- 
crat, while every one listened. 
For once the newspaperman was dumb. 
"It was a very dark occasion," continued his tormentor. 
Mr. McEwen looked at him appealingly. The other's eyes 
twinkled, and the culprit knew he would not be betrayed. 
"But," he says in telling it, "I have never stolen any coal 
since." 



Now that Mayor Schmitz has been entertaining the officers 
of the French cruiser Protet, it seems a good time to tell 
of a rather ambiguous French compliment which one of 
these executives handed to a witty society beauty while in 
the port of San Diego. I am not sure whether it was Commo- 
dore Bernaud or one of his subordinates. There were four 
i.. the group standing on a veranda of the coronado Hotel — 
two buds, an American officer, and the Frenchman. During 
the conversation the chic beauty with the glib tongue deliv- 
ered a bon mot that tickled Monsieur. 

"Ah," he exclaimed, "Miss Smith is charmante! She is 
so — what do you call it? — so foolish!" 

* * * 

Archbishop Riordan is not known as a wit, although re- 
cently he has been accredited with several good things. 
His Grace has the old-fashioned idea that when a woman 
becomes a grandmother she should dress like an old woman. 
He does not realize that to-day women never become old. 
In order that the Archbishop's remark be understood, I 
must explain that in the Catholic church girls of about 
hfteen are dressed in white for a certain religious cere- 
mony. On this occasion they are called "Daughters of 
Mary." 

The Archbishop was at a Catholic fair when he spied Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin and some other ladies of her age dressed 
in white, and His Grace said, gravely: "Ah, I see we have 
some Daughters of Mary with us this evening." 



Tho Earlcourt, at 1011 Pine street, has the distinction of 
being the smallest and most exclusive family hotel in San 
Francisco. What it lacks in size it makes up in the luxury 
and elegance of its appointments, being undoubtedly the 
most lavishly fitted up hotel in the "West. 



Mr. George Heimrod, recently appointed U. S. Consul to 
Samoa, sailed for Apia Thursday. On Wednesday afternoon 
he was given a most enjoyable farewell banquet by a dozen 
or more friends. 



It lightens the burden of life to drink Old Crow Whis- 
key, yellow label. It possesses all the qualities that go to 
make up a good liquor. 

You will always find the very best quality of fruits 

and vegetables at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-45-46 Cali- 
fornia Market. They keep everything in season. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, Stm Francisco. 



Pears' 

What is wanted of soap 
for the skin is to wash it 
clean and not hurt it. 
Pure soap does that. This 
is why we want pure soap; 
and when we say pure, 
we mean without alkali. 

Pears' is pure ; no free 
alkali. You can trust a 
soap that has no biting in 
it that's Pears'. 

Established over ioo years. 




This man is fav- 
ored with two of 
the greatest bles- 
sings that can be 
bestowed — one 
on the seat be- 
side him, the 
other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

iStudebaker, market and tenth sts. 



Rjumeo-t 

CHAMPAGNE 

RUINART pere et fits, RHEIMS, France 

Established in 1729 
HUBERT BROS., 21321s market street 

AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Phelan Bldg. Tel. Main 5387 San Francisco. Gal. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 190 




■ . 



ociety 




With so many teas to choose from last Saturday, each 
with its corps of lovely assistauts, it is impossible to award 
the palm to any one of them. Possibly the most elaborate 
decorations were seen at Mrs. Mills', where the Misses Hunt- 
ington were guests of honor; at Mrs. Brice's tea Miss Alma 
McClung was decidedly the prettiest girl present; at Mrs. 
Henry Scott's Miss Georgie Hopkins carried off the honors 
ir that line. It was quite noticeable how many of the fair 
demoiselles and young matrons wore white, which has 
sprung into great and deserved popularity this season. 
Nearly everyone was talking of the delightful party la Jeu- 
nesse had proved the night before, and how grateful they 
should all feel to Mrs. Voorhies and Mrs. McClung, who had 
labored so hard to make the hall the scene of Oriental 
beauty that it was. The cotillio:i. which was led by Mr. 
Percy King, only lasted an hour and a half, but after supper 
there was general dancing for a couple of hours. A delight- 
ful wind-up of that day of teas was Mr. James Phelan's 
dinner-dance at the Palace, where u.is. Eleanor Martin and 
Mr. Frank Sullivan acted as chaperons and received the 
guests who composed the party. The decorations were 
palms and a profusion of American beauty roses on a horse- 
shoe-shaped table, where the guests enjoyed themselves 
from seven-thiity till eleven p. m., when the room was 
cleared of furniture, and dancing was in order for several 
hours. Contrary to the general expectation, teas were to 
the fore last Sunday, the desire to "talk it all over" counter- 
balancing the fatigue resulting from the multitudinous affairs 
of the preceding forty-eight hours. Miss Kate Herrin possibl] 
having the lion's share of visitors. 

With the exception of the large tea at Mrs. Adam 
Grant's on Wednesday and at Mrs. Huntington's to-day, en- 
tertainments have this week rather run to luncheons and 
dinners than teas. Monday last was largely given over to 
the hotels, so many ladies making their homes this winter 
at the numerous hostelries at which Monday is reception 
day. One exception was the little informal tea given by 
Mrs. Albert Dibble for her sister. Mrs. Green, at which Miss 
Juliette Williams assisted her. At the Century Hall on 
Tuesday the Mills Club was in great form, holding one of 
the largest club receptions of the season, upwards of five 
hundred guests being present, and the "at home" of Mrs. 
Nichols and Miss Mary the same afternoon was largely 
attended. Miss Stella Fortman's luncheon party of ten 
last Tuesday was in honor of Miss Maud duff; Mrs. Sidney 
M. Smith also gave a luncheon on Tuesday at her home on 
Broadway and Webster. Miss Bernice Landers gave a pink 
dinner on Tuesday evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Wheaton, to meet whom eleven other guests were invited, 
and Mrs. Jo Tobin was the hostess of a dainty dinner the 
same night. Miss Cornelia Scott was chief guest at Miss 
Charlotte Ellinwood's luncheon party of eighteen on Wed- 
nesday; Mrs. Winthrop Lester's dinner on Wednesday was 
in honor of her guest, Miss Georgie Jones. Miss Pearl 
Landers and Miss Mabel Hogg were joint guests of honor at 
Miss Fanny Danforth's luncheon on Thursday; Mrs. E. B. 
Pond's second luncheon took place yesterday, and Miss 
Bessie Huntington gives a tea this afternoon. Miss Elsie 
Sperry, one of the season's buds, gave two young ladies' 
luncheons this week at her home on California street, one 
on Tuesday, and the other on Thursday, and will to-morrow 
be the hostess of a Sunday tea. 

Some of our San Francisco belles lent their assistance at 
the tea given in Oakland last Tuesday by Mrs. W. L. Oliver, 
for the debut of her daughter, Miss Anita, which was one 
of the largest given across the bay this season; a dinner 
party followed the afternoon reception. Tuesday evening 
was one of interest on both sides of the bay. In Oakland, 
the first "Assembly" of the season was held in Reed's 
Hall, many going from this side of the bay to participate in 
the dance, and in San Francisco the first of the Greenway 



balls — as they are termed — came off with eclat at Native 
Sons' Hall. Mr. Percy King led the cotillion at the Friday 
Fortnightly dance last night. Mrs. Robinson was the chap- 
eron of the lunch party given on board the revenue cutter 
McCullough at Sausalito last Friday by Lieutenant John 
Mel. It was a jolly affair, despite the fact of its being the 
very coldest day of the cold month January has so far 
proved to be this year. 

The change in the date of Miss Eleanor Morrow's mar- 
riage to Lieutenant Roosevelt, U. S. A., which came as a 
surprise to her friends, was necessitated by the groom's sud- 
den orders for the Philippii.es. The marriage took place 
last Wednesday at two o'clock at the home of Judge Mor- 
row at San Rafael; it was a white wedding, the ceremony 
being performed by the Rev. A. A. McAllister, chaplain at 
the Mary Island Navy Yard. The bride, who was robed in 
white organdie trimmed with lace and orange blossoms, and 
carried a bouquet of white carnations, was attended by Miss 
Alice Wilkins, whose gown was of white point d'esprit and 
her bouquet of pink carnations. Dr. John E. Page, U. S. N., 
officiated as best man, he and the grocni both appearing in 
full dress uniform. A biidal dejeuner followed the cere- 
mony, at which about fifty guests were seated, those invited 
being limited to relatives and a few intimate friends, and 
on Thursday the young couple sailed by the transport Kil- 
patrick for Manila. The invitations are at last out for 
the mairiage of Miss India Scott and Mr. Arthur Spear on 
Saturday next. It is to be an evening wedding at the home 
of the bride's aunt, Mrs. Willis, on California street, and 
everything she does is in such a finished way that great ex- 
pi < tatioas are abroad. The fair bride will not have any 
"grown up" attendants; the young maid. Miss Louise Lord, 
v. ho is to officiate as maid of honor, is still of tendir years, 
as is Marion Stovell, who is to be flower bearer. Both will 
be gowned in pink. The groom will be supported by Mr. 
Milton S. Latham as best man, and the nuptial knot will be. 
tied by the Rev. Bradford I.eavitt. The next very large 
wedding on the tapis is that of Miss Maud Mullius and Dr. 
John Rodger; Clark, February 5th being the date set for 
the ceremony, which will tak" place at Grace Episcopal 
Church. Miss Leontine Blakeman is to officiate as maid of 
honor. 

Easter Monday is the date now set for the marriage of 
Mr. Willard Drown and Miss Edith Preston. 

Those friends of Miss Addle Murphy who were so jubi- 
lant over her promised return here next month, after her 
long absence abroad, and the prospect of having her once 
more at home with them, were rather premature in their 
rejoicings, for though she will come, her presence here will 
be but temporary, owing to her engagement to Mr. J. 
Outhout Seibeit of Washington. D. u., of which the news was 
received here last Tuesday. Her future home will of course 
be the other side of the continent. Still, there is as com- 
pensation for her loss the wedding to look forward to, and 
that will for a certainty be as brilliant a ceremonial as all 
the Murphy functions have heretofore proved to be. 

From Alameda has come the news of the engagement of 
Mary Augusta Gibbons to Mr. Wallace Dana Evans, who. as 
well as the lovely bride, is prominent in San Francisco's 
social world. 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan. Pimples. Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 53 years mid is so harmless U e 
taste it to bo sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of si mi )nr nauie, 
l>r. I.. A.Sayre said to a ludy of the 
haut-tou (a patient : "As you ladli 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
iiml's Cream' aa the least harmful ol 

all the skin preparations." For sale 
by nil drueririHt* and Fanoy-iroods 
Dealers In the I' nil e.l Slates. Ciumdas 
nud Europe, 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
.17 Great .Tones street. N. Y. 



January 18, 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



Mrs. H> is in 1 1 1 « - llghl ol 

bone i i.i her da«n 

Smith will 
burs*. ^. Mrs. Fred Tallaut's 1 1 > 1 1 

day will be given In honor uf Miss Pearl l^anil- 

reoing the dance at Mrs. Kittles is being anticl- 
wlth much pleasure, Miss rzelen Dean gll 
ladies' tea at the Palace on Wednesday afternoon, and a 
number of dinners are being arranged to pi Huut- 

ingto.i ball on Friday evening, which gives promls 
one of the events of the season. 

There will be a hop at the Presidio next Monda] ■ fenlng. 

I'repartlons are being made by the lady managers of the 
California Bye and Ear Hospital for a benefit to be given 
al the Grand Opera House on the' evening of January 
in the yearly benefits heretofore given, San Francisco has 
nobly to the front in aiding and appreciating this 
hospital, which is the only one of us kind west Of Denver. 
The Board of Managers is comprised chiefly of prominent 
i hili-women. and those well known in society are enrolled 
as active and associate members. Unquestionably it will 
be the leading social event of the season. No energy 
ing spared for the complete success of the affair. An excel- 
lent programme is in preparation. Among those having ii 
In charge are: Mrs. .1. D. Murphy, Mrs. Clarence Mann, Mrs. 
John i. Babln, Mrs. J. L. Mattel. Mrs. A. Clarke, Mrs. Edward 
Partridge. Mrs. Irvin Wiel, Mrs. Clyde Payne, Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Babcock, Mrs. Redmond Payne, Mrs. G. J. Bucknall, 
Mrs. M. R. Roberts, Mrs. C. T. Deane, Mrs. G. R. Sneath, 
Mrs. W. J. Dodd. Mrs. Robert White. Mrs. Walter Graves. 
Mrs. William Willis. Mrs. A. 0. Haselhurst. Mrs. Arthur Corn- 
wall, Mrs. Isaac Hecht, Mrs. John Lawrence. Mrs. Henry 
Hodger, Mrs. Henry Sontag, Mrs. J. G. James, Mrs. Rodney 
Kendrick, Mrs. R. Jennings, Miss Gertrude Gates, Mrs. James 
Kirk, Miss Anna Cora Winchell. 

Preparations are already being made for the summer sea- 
son at the Hotel Del Monte. The winter guests are having 
a very enjoyable time. 

Miss Marks, daughter of Secretary Marks of the Pacific 
Mutual Life Insurance Co.. is very ill with pneumonia. 

Mrs. A. M. Simpson and Miss Eduh will have their first 
al home next Friday afternoon; Mr. and Mrs. Lawson S. 
Adams were at home yesterday, and will be again next 
Friday at their pretty home in Belvedere. Friday, the 24th, 
and Friday, the 31st, are the days named for the at 
homes to be given by Mrs. Ellinwood and Miss Charlotte. 

Miss Helen Wagner is visiting her friend. Miss Bertha 
Dolbeer; Miss Ollie Holbrook has returned from her visit 
to Virginia City; the Floods are also back again from their 
brief visit to New York; Colonel and Mrs. Ruhlen of Seattle 
are spending a few weeks in Southern California. Colonel 
J. G. Chandler, U. S. A., of Los Angeles, is visiting San 
Francisco at present. Dr. and Mrs. Murtagh, nee Shoib, 
were among the passengers by the transport Kilpatrick for 
Manila last Thursday. Apropos of Manila, Mrs. C. L. Bent 
may be expected home from her visit there any day now, 
which no doubt will be delightful news to her numerous 
friends. 

The following are among the guests who are enjoying the 
delightful winter weather at the Hotel Rafael: Mr. D. A. 
Bryant, Mr. Wm. Greenhagen and wife, Mrs. Louisa Bergman, 
Mr. L. F. Moulton, Mr. Morton L. Cook and wife, Mrs. M. 
Austin, Mr. S. W. Cowles and wife, Mr. R. K. Dunn and wife, 
Miss Edna Dunn, Mr. George W. Haas, Mr. John F. Merrill 
and wife, Mrs. A. F. Fechtler, Mr. R. Maddox and wife, Mrs. 
B. Gatzert, Mr. Arthur G. Nason, Mrs. Van Cliet, Mr. W. P. 
Reir and wife, Mr. F. Treskow and wife, Miss W. V. Landers. 

Preparations for the annual Mardi Gras masked ball 
given by the San Francisco Art Association at the Mark Hop- 
kins Institute of Art, have already begun, and from the great 
amount of interest being shown in the affair even this early, 
there is every prospect of a large attendance. The gentle- 
men having the matter in charge are Mr. James W. Byrne, 
President of the Art Association and Chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee; Mr. Edward M. Green way, Chairman of 
the Floor Committee; Mr. Henry Heyman, Chairman of the 
Music Committee, and Mr. L. P. Latimer, Chairman of the 
Committee on Decorations. Mardi Gras comes this year on 
February 11th, and the invitations, which are elaborate and 



will be sent mil n 

Tin 
tit of tin- I mi I'ii s Daugntei 
unlay. Jannarj 16th, al Central Park. Boi 
t.i turn out In force, and already a large Dumb 
have been pun hased. Among those who « ill sit in thi 
will be; Mrs. Horace Plllsbury, Miss Jennie Bialr, Mi 
M. a. Miller, Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Miss Georgle Hopkins, 
Mrs. Alfred Tnbbs, Mis. Fred Parrott, Mis Austin Parrott, 
Mis. Qeorge McNear, Mrs. L. i. Baker, Mrs. J. Fletcher 

Kyer. Mrs. Daniel llrysdale, Mrs. E. 1.. McCormlck, Miss 

Bthel Hager, Mrs. W. B. Fuller. Miss Grace Spreckels, Mr. 
Jo Tobiu. Jr., Mr. Webster .inns. .\iis. Walter Dean, Mrs. 

i Mack. Ri eats ma] be bad by applyii 

Miss Blair, Hotel Richelieu. Reserved seats are one dollar. 
and general admission may be changed to reserved by ap- 
plying to Sherman & Clay's store on January 23-24. 



Stops the Cough and Works Off the Cold. 

I,axntive Bromo-Qtiinino Tablets euro a cold In one day. No Cure, No Pay 
Price 25 cents. 



Every original package of Jesse Moore Whiskey is guaran- 
teed absolutely pure by Jesse Moore Hunt Co. 





Locomobile With Lady Chaffeur. 

ANT LADY CAN RUN THEM. 

Model to be seen at The Salesroom of the Locomobile Co. of 

the Pacific, 1 622 to 1 628 Market St. 

Sf ARPF Books, Photographs, etc. Catalogue, with samples, fii.Ou 
JVanvi, Sea i ed leUer p08t . o. ARTHUR, 6 Rue I'tcluse, Paris. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 




The promoter of a new local indus- 
A Hint for Local trial enterprise, after satisfying 

Company Promoters, himself by years of hard work that 
it was useless to seek the capital 
required for construction purposes here, hied himself East 
eventually with the intention of getting the money there. He 
happened, happily, among a set of financiers who were quite 
willing to finance the operation, which they judged was 
worthy of exploitation, but before taking any decisive step 
they deemed it prudent to call into their couucil a prominent 
Wall street banker. He sat in judgment eventually upon the 
scheme and its promoter in a manner which was somewhat 
of a surprise to the latter. "Your proposition," he said, 
"is one of which I could under ordinary circumstances 
recommend to my friends, but it is one which I think should 
appeal to the monied men of your own city. Why is it nec- 
essary to come here for money when I see by reference to 
statistics that your banks, commercial and savings, are 
over-run with idle money mounting up into the millions? 
From what we can learn here, in San Francisco you are 
continually fighting, tearing one another to pieces. You fight 
your water, gas and railroad companies, and when you 
are not fighting them you fight each other. For my part 1 
would not care to take up anything there which would in 
the end lay one open to attack upon all sides, and for this 
reason I can only suggest a plan which, if carried out by you, 
will justify me in advising the advance of the money you 
require. Return home and see what you can do to secure 
the recognition of your enterprise from enough of your peo- 
ple to guarantee their Liendly interest and support. Have it 
understood that in subscribing to the stock they will not have 
to put up a cent until the enterprise has been placed upon a 
paying basis and earning dividends. \\ hen you haVe enough 
contracts of the kind signed- to show that your owi. people 
are with you. come back here and the money necessary for 
construction purposes will be advanced." The promoter has 
returned to San Francisco, wiser in experience, and pro- 
vided with a bundle of contracts which in due course will 
be presented to capitalists 1 ..ge and small invoking their 
assistance on a long-time c r e lit basis. They call for the 
payment of subscriptions, sixty days after the enterprise is 
in actual operation and suffi< ic itly advanced to pay at least 
five per cent upon the investment, waiving at the same time 
all personal liability on the part of any stockholder for 
present or future indebtedness. It remains now to be seen 
whether or not even a proposition like this, which practically 
gives something for nothing, will work out in practice. 

There is no better or more eco- 

The Cost of Sinking nomically managed property on 
a Shaft. the Coast than that of the Lincoln 

Gold Mine Development Company 
of Sutter Creek, Amador County. For that reason the 
figures given in the annual report for the year ended Decem- 
ber 31, 1901, showing the cost of sinking the shaft with 
power drills as compared with the cost by hand drilling, will 
be both interesting and instructive for those who are en- 
gaged in the mining business. It took twelve miners ac- 
cording to this statement, and a foreman working eight-hour 
shifts, for 304 days, and cost $10,b40 to sink 450 feet. The 
average cost of laboi per foot was $23.64. Working with 
power drills, 477 feet of shaft was sunk in 208 days, nine 
miners with a day and night foreman employed, at a total 
cost of $13.85 for labor per foot. In addition, the cost of 
material per foot of shaft was as follows: Lumber. $5.27; 
powder, $1.82; caps, 6c; fuse, 16c; candles, 34c; extra parts 
of power drills, bring the total cost of the shaft up to $21.96, 
not including power or top expense. The Lincoln people 
are also able to draw comparisons between the cost of wood 
and oil, the latter having been in use as a substitute for the 
past five months and twelve days. The average cost per 
month for wood was $547.27, and the cost per month for 
oil was $405.55, a saving per month of $141.72. 



The commencement of work on the 
The Pine-St. Market. Brunswick ground of the Potosi 

Mining Company has put some vim 
into the market on Pine street, and business has been more 
active during the week. The principal advance has taken 
place in the Potosi, and large transactions are reported 
it: the stock. Hale & Norcross has also been quite active 
at higher prices, owing to an improvement in the formation 
in the west workings, which leads the management to be- 
lieve that they are nearing a ledge. Work in this drift has 
been pushed for months past with a grim determination 
and in face of many difficulties, and its success will be hailed 
with satisfaction by the street. Should any one be found 
in this direction it will bring about a sharp revival in Corn- 
stock mining operations and benefit every company along 
the lode. If the other companies had acted conjointly with 
Hale & Norcross the investigation of this hitherto undevel- 
oped company could have been carried on to better advan- 
tage, and it is a wonder some united effort was not made 
long ago to settle the question of ore bodies out west, as 
all will reap the advantage of any discovery of the kind. 
Some good reports are now heard from Overman and 
Caledonia, where a new territory, reported rich, is about to 
be entered. There are indications of livelier times on the 
street this year, for all the forebodings of the bear clique 
and their allies. 

This is a month of annual elections 

Local Companies in among the larger class of indus- 

Annual Session. trial corporations. Among those' 

held during the week was that of 
the San Francisco Gaslight Company. There were some 
changes in the directory, Mr. A. H. Payson being elected 
President in place of Mr. Joseph B. Crockett, and Mr. C. L. 
Barrett secretary in place of his brother, Mr. V. G. Barrett, 
w ho filled the position for the past forty-two years. Mr. 
Adam Grant was elected Vice-President, and Mr. Levi Strauss, 
Mr. Rudolph Spreckels, Mr. D. T. Murphy, Mr. George W. 
Prescott, and Mr. H. H. Small, directors. The forthcoming 
election of the Gas and Electric Company excited much in- 
terest, owing to the changes which are likely to take place 
in the management. It is not certain yet who will get the 
Presidency, but it is generally known that Mr. Joseph B. 
Crockett, who will retire from the position, is slated for 
the Chief Engineer. 



The annual election of the Alaska Packers Association was 
held during the week, and the reports presented all spoke 
of a very prosperous year. The following Board of Direc- 
tors was elected to serve for the ensuing year: Mr. Henry 
1 ( (irt man, President; Mr. Charles hirsch, Mr. D. Drysdale, 
vice-Presidents; Mr. E. B. Pond, Mr. G. Niebaum. Mr. Syd- 
ney M. Smith, Mr. W. B. Bradford, Mr. Isaac Liebes, Mr. Geo. 
W. Hume, and Mr. C. W. Dorr, Secretary. The financial 
statement showed total assets valued at $5,986,583.20. The 
contingent reserve fund now amounts to $1,651,834.55. 



The stockholders of the Vigorit Powder Company made 
some changes in the Directory at its meeting. Mr. C. da 
Guigne was elected President in place of Mr. George A. 
Moore, and Mr. John L. Howard Vice-President. The other 
directors elected were: Messrs. George A. Moore, S. L. Ab- 
bott, Jr., and G. Collins. Subsequently Messrs. Moore and 
Abbott resigned, owing to the change in the Presidency, of 
which it is said Mr. Moore had received no previous intima- 
tion. 

Business during the past week 
The Local Stock Market, has been dull, with prices gen- 
erally steady in the local Stock 
and Bond Exchange. The absence of any speculative op- 
portunities keeps operators who indulge in the kind of busi- 
ness in the background for the time being. The uncertain- 
ties of the policy likely to be adopted by the new control of 
the gas companies seems to check trading in that quarter, 
and water stocks are in about the same plight. Alaska 
Packers stock has been rather easier, but this is to be ex- 
pected, after the sharp advance which preceded the election. 
The new rate of dividends having been established, it is 
reasonable to presume that values will now settle at the level 
justified by the percentage of returns upon the investment. 
Bonds come in for a fair share of attention from investors 
as usial. 



January 18. 1902. 



8A,4 FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



17 



Transactions nn the Producers' <>ll Kv hange from Janu- 
h to January 13th. IS 



Apollo 


• HARK* 


■ a Via or 

i 

N i 
<«• ". i*M 00 
scs 9 
jo 9 II 

4 9 5 

.« 9 Si 
go i 

< 

a « 

7 60 9 
2 90 9 . 
6 60 9 6 75 

a i a 

11 9 22 

8 9 
1 15 9 1 211 
19 9 22 
8 60 9 5 75 


to 




17 

i (H 

1.SW 
100 

I'M 


HI 
llaiiford 

11, .mo OH 

Junction 
Kern ■ >i. 
1'elroleum I'cnler 


i-l 


• 






San Ju«quin O A ]> I « 

Oil Cllr Petroleum 







»i 
2,111 








Monarch of Arizona. 


1, 


1.17.'. 
.wo 




:r..:ir3 


»R565 



The practicability of the locomohile in fire departments 
was well illustrated recently at a New York fire. Chief Croker 
in his locomobile going three miles in five minutes. The 
chief is the only one in the Xew York fire department who 
has a locomobile, but the good work done in this instance 
referred to convinces him that before long all fire depart- 
ment vehicles will be run by electricity. 



Going up in the captive balloon at Market and Tenth streets 
has become a very popular form of amusement. The balloon 
goes up 1.500 feet, and is held by a cable that makes it per- 
fectly safe. The view from the basket is wonderful, and the 
ride a most delightful experience. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country. Tel. Main 1042. 



The reaidenta "f Marin COD.nl 

lied to travel b ia fur- 

I by tin North Paclfli <'. . 

log ovei lb.- Improvement 

Fremont, under which the coTpo ii now be 

known aa tin North Shore Railroad Compa 13 No) onl] is 

1 line 10 in- 1 hange 1 t<> ;i!i 1 
will also he made through Napa City, Vim mill.'. Ruther 
ford ami other towns tn St. Helena. The bay terminus on 
the other Bide will be at Point San Pedro, froni which a road 
will also be constructed to San Rafael. 



The demand for men stenographers is constantly increas- 
ing. The managers of Heald's Business College, in this city, 
announce that they cannot supply the demand, from ton to 
twenty applications coming in each moLith in excess of what 
they can furnish graduates for. II ild'a has come to he 
looked upon by business men as the proper place to apply 
for book-keepers, stenographers and young men thoroughly 
equipped for business careers. The departments of elec- 
tricity, civil engineering, metallurgy and kindred sciences 
recently added to their school increases the chances for their 
graduates to be placed in lucrative positions by them. 



Pyrography Outfits 
and all kinds of Artists' Materials. Paints, Brushes, Canvas 
Studies and Skins and Wood to burn. We are agents for 
W insor and Newton, makers of the best Artists' Materials 
ir the world. Come to Headquarters for everything wanted 
in the Artists' Material line. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



The great Sweepstake Mine near Weaverville is now 
running with an ample supply of water. A large number of 
men have been at work laying the great pipe line, which is 
complete as far as East and West Weaver creeks, and which 
works to perfect satisfaction. About 2000 tons of freight, 
consisting mostly of steel purchased and ready to be riveted 
into pipe, was take iu to the mine last fall. 




J.O.Harron. «-«. T/?o? Richard, ivv.cen-rs. 

formerly o/ 

Parke &Ls/Ky Co. 



A.xwCone, ^". y to»« 
v Fulton Foundry 

Virgin, a Clt^ 



iftio 



_[_ INCORPOfTiATELD 

£<xkers field, C<-/., LosAnge/es^ <-„/. £| _ O »T j-R EMONT St 

fhNiNG Rilling Machinery' 

OilWeii Machinery and Supplies, ,3, u r , , r , 

•j| £& <-, n ' WoodanJJron WorMng Machinery. 

** ^LECTRICALjil'ACiilNER/ApjDpPPLIANCES. 

J3 01 LESfT, 

1 M , f 



r^j^jgs^j-i r i^^zti^i^^> srNoy7//S> (jPMPj3EtS'iSOR<5_ l 



l fgm^^m 



'pUMP/; 



*3tn .-_ — 






18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 







sssssvi? 



nsurance 



m 




When the Insurance Commissioner of Maryland sent his 
now famous letter to the Mutual Reserve Fuiiil declining to 
re-license the Company in his State, he made the road rocky 
for the company. Now he is being aided in his fight by the 
church. The Bishop of Maryland writes the Insurance 
Commissioner as follows: "I write for the purpose of thank- 
ing you sincerely for your action with regard to the Mutual 
Reserve Fund Life Association. My own case was even 
worse than that you have stated in the name of Mr. Buck- 
man. To write the particulars would require a very long and 
full statement. But there is one point not named in your 
letter to Mr. Burnhaui. which I think ought to be noticed. 
It is that when they began, a number of years ago, to in- 
crease the assessments, their authorized statement sent 
out with the notice of assessment, contained the assertion 
that the object of the increase was to bring up the reserve 
fund to a certain amount (I think $2,000,000) with the assur- 
ance that that amount neing secured there would thereafter 
be no increase of assessment above the amounts stated in 
a table accompanying the notice; but that everything in 
escess of that, if needed, would be provided out of the re- 
serve fund. All this was distinctly and clearly stated and 
repeatedly, in the notices sent. Upon that agreement and 
condition I consented to pay, at first the increased amount. 
But presently they violated that agreement and continued to 
increase the charges far beyond the figures named in the 
schedule that they referred to. I protested against this, 
appealing to the Commissioner of Insurance in New York, 
but received no satisfaction. Their charges by this time had 
become enormous, and the result was. that at an age when 
it was impossible for me to secure insurance in any other 
Company, I was crowded out of that by the violation of their 
express agreement." 

When the clergy begin to fight it is about quitting time, 
and it appears as if the poor old Mutual Reserve Fund is 
doomed. If these actions on the part of Insurance Com- 
missioners were not justifiable, they would amount to per- 
secution, but the charges piled up against this company are 
so overwhelming in proof and in numbers that it is a won- 
der how any Insurance Commissioner of any State will allow 
the company to operate with his san.tion. California In- 
surance Commissioners refused to license the company, and 
it is not officially known in this State. 

* • • 

Manager Gregory of the Aetna Life has appointed Mr. F. 
A. Selover, who was formerly District Manager of the 
Equitable for Santa Clara Valley, to the management of 
the Aetna's interests in Southern California. Manager 
Gregory, who has been making a tour of the southern part 
of the State, reports that the company has secured a fine 
office building in Los Angeles. The accident department 
there will remain as formerly in the hands of Mr. Charles 
L. Hubbard. 

* * * 

The Phoenix-Atlas proposed deal is off absolutely, and the 
United States representatives of both companies have been 
so advised by their head offices. Provisional agreements 
by the directors had been ratified by the stockholders of 
both organizations, but the courts refused its sanction, hold- 
ing that the rights of the policyholders of the Atlas life 
departments would not have been properly safeguarded by 
the proposed transfer of the company's life liability to the 
Pelican Life. The latter and the Phoenix are closely allied, 
and the inability to consummate the deal is therefore all 
the more surprising. Another objection is said to have been 
that the Atlas charter prohibits its amalgamation with any 
other company. 

* * * 

The officers of the Fidelity and Casualty Company Mr. C 
J. Bosworth manager, have been removed from the Mutual 
Life Building to 31B and 318 California street 



Mr. T. L. Miller, assistant secretary of the Pacific Mutual 
Life, has resigned his position. Mr. R. J. Mier. who has been 
in th? company's employ since boyhood, and who has had 
the responsible position of manager of the accident depart- 
ment for the past seven years, was elected assistant secre- 
tary. 

* * * 

Mi. G. B. Burling is confined to his room with an attack of 
bronchitis. 

* * * 

It is reported with feelings of regiet that Insurance Com- 
mission .t A. .!. Clunie is dangerously sick with a severe 
attack of pneumonia. 

* * * 

Omaha, Nebraska, is in trouble. The Mayor says the 
fire department and water supply is deficient. 

* * * 

The Knights of Pythias at one time acquired some land 
in Texas. It is now said that oil has been struck on the 
tract. 

* * * 

Insurance Commissioner Dearth of Minnesota, holds that 
the local boards of underwriters of the various cities in 
the State, which fix rates and regulate the acceptance of 
rules, are combines which violate the anti-trust law in that 
they do away with all competition and arbitrarily regulate 
the price of insurance. 

* * * 

The Adjuster of San Francisco calls the Insurance Field 
of Kentucky "its salmon-colored friend." Think what might 
have happened had it printed "saddle" instead of "salmon." 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Brumo Quinine Tablets. All druergists refund tfae money if 
itfaila to cure. E. W- Gro\e's signature is on each box. Price 2d cents 



Beware of unscrupulous dealers who refill Jesse Moore bot- 
tles with inferior goods. 



216-218 MISSION STREET 



TRINITY SCHOOL 



Moeta 
Cfrccndon 

CHAMP <U]NE 

WHITE SEAL and BRUT IMPERIAL 
Celebrated Vintage of J 893 
Unsurpassed in quality. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

Pacific Coast Agents. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

FOUNDED I876. 

A DAT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG 

GENTLEMEN. 

2203 CENTRAL AVENUE. S=\N FR*NGlSGO. GAL. 

Preparatory deportment for younger boys under the .supervision 
of a lady. Grammar ami hlsrb school departments under gentle- 
men teachers. University graduates. Accredited to the univer- 
sities. 
Phone Stciner 4550. LTON &> ROGER, Principals. 

UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGES 

SHOT GUN SHELLS 
GUN WADS .< j. 
PRIMERS, ETC. .* 

fOR SALt [VtRYWtHRl. ASK Ttlt TRADE 

From Thomas'. London 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Fine Shoes 

Near Waldorf-Astoria, 60 WEST 34TH ST. 

Between 5th Ave. and Broadway. New York. 





January 18. 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1» 



The Atlantic Monthly sarcastically complained 
is behind t li • - turn - 
lioa»tlnK •> micro lynching. Tin' circle is narrowing, until 
illfornln ami the Pilgrim Btatr I 

ilalmlng thr illstlni tlon. 



There Is no excuse for wearing stained, great 

spotted rlothlng when a suit ran tie i leaned so I 
quickly and cheaply at Spanldlng's Cleaning and D 
Works. 127 Stockton street. They also clean sloves, neck- 
ties, laces, curtains, tapestries and all such articles. Goods 
• ailed for and delivered, and work done promptly. 



A subscription to the San Knmcisco Fire Dispatch will 

add to your sense of safety. They and the Fire Department 
receive dispatches simultaneously, and if the fire is at or 
near your place of business yon are notified and taken there. 



FlRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMAMS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) OF LONDON. ENGLAND 

C- F- MULLLNS. Manager, 416-418 California street, 8. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Unexcelled for liberality and security 



Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 



Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building 

San Francisco 



The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California 



Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital H.OOO.OOO.OO 

Oaata Assets 4,081,896.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

Bntish and Foreign Marine Insurance Co 

(limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

OantAL , I6,700.0ni> 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO.. Agents 316 California street, S. F 

The Thurinflia Insurance Gompany 

ol ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital. 12.260,000 Assets HO.984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 

Paolflo Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 8ohlsaalngar, City Agent. 104 Montgomery *U 8. F 



INSURANCE. 

'•tare Co*** oc»uc>m- 




G. h. WARD, 

Manager, 



337 PINE STREET. 
ISSIRANCE COMPANY S»r. Fr.nci.co. Oil 

or mmronr Phone. Main 5S0V- 



Pounded A. D. 1792 



Cc 



Insurance Company 



of Morth A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA. PEN*. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000.000 

Surplus to Poller Holders fc. 022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 



Capital Paid Up. 13,446.100 

Surplus to Poller Holders, i8.930.431.41. 



Assets. 124.662 043.35 
Losses Paid Over. ♦184.000,000.00 



PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Looal Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New' Zealand Insurance Gompany 

or New Zealand 
Capital, (6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS. Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Fhoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York- 

Capital, 83,000.000 Gross Assets, 913,637,833 

Surplus to Polioy-holders, $7,631,926 
H. L, Koff, General Agent: Geo. M, Mitchell & Co.. City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Franclsoo, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of 
General and Special Agents ri-sident in the Pacific Coast States, ensur- 
ing prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the 
Insuring public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and 
Payment of Losses. 

THE AMERICAN CREDIT- 
INDEMNITY GO. OF NEW YORK 

S. M. PHELAN, President. 
CREDIT INSURANCE ONLY 

The Leading Mercantile Houses of the United States 

■ endorse this system. 

Correspondence Solicited. A business producer and profit protector. 
GEORGE J. STERN8DORFF. 211 SANSOME STREET 

Pacific Coast Agent Tel. Black 4434 SAN FRANCISCO 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(incorporated by the State ol New York.) 
Aseeta over $62,000,000. Liabilities $53.0r'0,000, Surplus over 88.000,000 

Issues policies for all approved forms of Insurance; adapted to all stations 
and circumstances of life. Policies sre free from restriction* as to travel 
and residence; are clear, concise business contracts, and conditions are 
plain and Pimple and easily understood. 

Home office— New York City. Pacific Coast head office. 419 California 
Street, San Francisco. 

Jonn R. Heeemaii, President; Haley Plske. Vice-President; Geo. B. 
Woodward, Secretary; George H. Gaston, Second "Vice-President; James 
S- Roberts, Assistant Secretary* 



WE 

PAY YOUR 

Losses 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



Bubbles from tbe Swim. 



By Lady Algy. 

Isobel McKenna woke up the morning after the ball at 
the White House to find herself famous. She was not 
tucked away in the "among otheis present" columns, but 
stood out in individual paragraphs. This distinction was 
due to the marked favor of the Roosevelts. who have evi- 
dently made room in their hearts for Isobel. It was Mrs. 
Roosevelt who first singled out Isobel as a "worth while" 
girl. Mrs. Roosevelt does not warm to the "frivols," but pre- 
fers women with a generous sprinkling of seriousness in 
their make-up. Miss McKenna apparently possesses the 
key to her friendship code, for the "first lady of the land" 
has been especially gracious to this California girl. Isobel 
always had the rare faculty of winning older ladies — even 
in the days of her buddom she never forgot the pretty cour- 
tesies due them which other debutantes in the fizzy-dizzy 
moments of first triumphs neglected. It was this thought- 
fulness which made such a hit with the late Mrs. Donahoe 
and Mrs. Eleanor Martin that they argued Peter into pro- 

pos . However, that's another story. This has to do 

only with Isobel's triumph at the White House ball, where 
she carried exquisite flowers sent by a cavalier who did 
not leave their selection to a doting mamma or a fond 
aunt (see "Courtships that have been Courted for Me," by 
P. M.) 

I hear Isobel has found a new way of dressing her hair, 
which is very becoming, and that she is considered a very 
distinguished looking girl. Her gown for the ball was a soft 
satin the color of corn in the ripening, and was conspicuous 
even in that medley of gorgeous costumes. Alice Roose- 
velt, like her mother, has annexed Isobel, which argues a 
brilliant social season for Miss McKenna. 

* * * 

The McNear dinner-dance was distinctly lacking in 
Oakland flavor — in fact, there were not enough commuters 
there to remind one that the McNears once occupied a large 
corner of San Francisco's boudoir. It was a pretty affair, 
unpunctuated hy any lavish display. The decorations were 
effective, the favors dainty, but not reminiscent of the good 
old days when the Crockers and Hopkinses gave germans. 
Then the favors would have tempted Burglar Bill, and could 
compare with those now given by the Gotham smart set. 
Old cotillion leaders still prattle of Hattie Crocker's german 
before she wedded an Alexander and New York. There 
were hand-painted tambourines for the ladies, and the 
painting alone on each o le cost $25. There were silken 
scarfs — "rebosos" imported from Salvador at $20 apiece. 
P'or the men there were match-boxes and scarf-pins of an 
emerald flanked by two diamonds. Wouldn't the eagles of 
the present-day leaders screech if they were put to any 
such extravagant use? 

* * • 

Now that the Huntington girls are home, Cousin Edith 
will probably get her promised ball. Only the kindliest feel- 
ings exist between The Huntingtons and Edith Huntingtons. 
After all, Edith has nothing to complain of — for if the 
H. E. Huntingtons did get the plumpest slice of wealth, she 
has more than her share of beauty. Personally, I consider 
Edith Huntington the prettiest girl among this season's 
buds. She has a fresh, piquante beauty that somehow all 
her photographs caricature. Those who have only seen 
her pictures can form no idea of her looks. Her cheeks are 
rosy as Christmas apples in contrast to the washed pink 
of most of our girls. A girl whose complexion can weather 
this season is good for many more, and as yet Edith Hunt- 
ington's show no sign of fade. There have been symptoms 
of a dent in her cardiac organ, but according to Miss Edith 
that is not a correct diagnosis. 

* * * 

It was luck, not lack of pluck and cleverness, that lost 
Alice Hager the golf game. She puts up a clean, square 
game in true sportsman spirit, without any social pooh-bahs 
to root against her opponents. Mrs. Gilman Brown could 
not have felt sore over defeat at the hands of such a worthy 
opponent — but chance ruled against Alice. Miss Hager plays 
a better game of golf than the Blingum cup-winners, but 
somehow she just misses it at the finish. Well, here's bet- 



ter luck next time — and all lovers of "fair play" will put 
ditto marks under that. 

Alice certainly won out at the Phelan dinner as the most 
stunning girl in the room. Her gown of pale blue satin, 
fashioned along severely simple lines, accentuated her beau- 
tiful figure — it was a gown that the perambulating skele- 
tons of the hour could not attempt, but Miss Hager carried it 
off splendidly and was acknowledged the hit of the affair. 

The Greenway cotillion brought out the cream of this 
season's frocks, with the palm divided between the Mesdames 
Taylor. Both gowns were eye-blinkers that cannot be de- 
scribed without abusing over-worked adjectives. Mrs. Gus 
Taylor's was a filmy white thing, embossed with velvet- 
encrusted taffeta and sprays of spangles, the flounce showing 
a touch of pale blue, and the bodice enriched with rare real 
lace. On a long, narrow piece of blue satin ribbon were alter- 
nately caught pale pink velvet roses and crimson autumn 
leaves. Of course you can't imagine it, only seeing is appre- 
ciating. It is the most successful gown Helen Taylor has 
worn this season, that has been one long triumph — sar- 
torially — for her. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 




cimmMaii 




ANNUAL 

CLEARANCE 5 ALE 




Discount 



NOW ON. 



5. ca G. GUMP CO. 

113 GEARY ST. 



ART GOODS, 
PICTURES, 



FINE CROCKER1 
and GLASSWARE. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, 



TtlK AWARD AT 
CHICAGO, 1898. 

"grand prix" Paris, ism. the HIGHEST possible 

AWARD. Tbe«e pens arc "the best In Hie World." 
Sole Bgent for the United Sin es. 
Mb. Hknuy Hon, 91Jolm Street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



January 18. 1902. 



SAN FRANCIS" NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY AND THE ST. LOUIS 

EXPOSITION. 

Freino ».. tlio gathering Ihm]> 

isscmblej for tl ■ imrpose of furthering lh<' 

m of thr tft.it-' i:i the great Louisiana Pun 

The San Joaquin Valley Development Assocla- 
, naturally most concerned In theli own 
1 themselves exclusively in thai 
on of the State. There were present some highly in 
ten, not a tew Of whom, like Professor Barr of 
Stockton, have demonstrated that they are sincerely Inter- 
ctted In public welfare. There exists no greater anomaly 
In this entire Western empire of ours than that presented 
in the paradoxical conditions prevailing in San Joaquin 
Valley. Eiteuding from Stockton to the base of the Tehach- 
apl is a tract of upwards of three hundred miles long, with 
a width of about thirty-five miles — a valley basin that will 
readily challenge comparison with any corresponding area 
on the globe. It will raise everything that can be pro- 
duced between the St. John's River, Florida, and Wyoming, 
and surpass either. The magnificent Sierras, flanking the 
entire eastern border of the valley, culminate in the grand 
ML Whitney, some 11,000 feet high, the Mt. Blanc of the 
In the very heart of these ranges are the unmatched 
wonderlands of the Yosemite Valley, the King's River 
and the Kern River Canyons. Their scenic splendors will 
remain the inspiration of painters and poets for ages. But 
what is of more immediate importance in this connection: 
this natural beauty is more than matched by opulence in 
natural tesources. in minerals, timber and latent electrical 
power of cascades and rivers, sufficient to create a veritable 
bee-hive of industrial and mining activity along the entire 
frontage of these mountain ranges, 300 miles long. Finally, 
under the very floor of the valley, mother nature has dupli- 
cated the oil wells of Baku as surely as the valley itself 
is geologically the Caspian Sea of Pacific Coast geological 
history. Surely, if anywhere in the world, San Joaquin Val- 
ley should be the "Seat of Empire." There she lies, with all 
her truly enormous potentialities, with two transcontinental 
railway systems penetrating her, her northern divisions abut- 
ting directly on deep sea water and a navigable river. 
With it all, she contains a population scattered all over 
her vast domain just about sufficient to make her a good- 
sized parish. What is worse yet, the very manner in 
which these unmatched resources have been permitted to be 
presented to the world at large has at times savored of 
the most abject parochialism. One instance of this will 
suffice. The Pan-American Exposition was certainly an in- 
stance where the San Joaquin Valley could have afforded to 
put her best foot forward. The following is a brief outline 
o£ what one of the wealthiest and presumably most progres- 
sive counties in the valley actually did do in the way of 
presenting its printed compliments to the world at large 
on that auspicious occasion. 

Its Chamber of Commerce possessed a clever fellow, who 
made himself chairman on publications. He then proceeded 
to prove how a public office can be made a private "snap" 
as follows: 

The party was greatly interested in a single activity — 
let us call it corn raising, which will do as an illustration. 
He promptly edited a pamphlet, in which it was clearly ap- 
parent that all the rest of the county's interest were pivoted 
on corn. Later on, presumably, the corn would be hogs. 
Then said County Supervisors paid upwards of ?1,000 for the 
printing of said document. The printing, the paper, and the 
illustrations were the best that the one and only Democratic 
weekly of the entire Valley could produce. And when the 
whole job-lot was through, nobody was willing to pay 
thirty cents a hundred for the home-made product. So it 
was all promptly shipped off and distributed on an occa- 
sion of world-wide interest to the lasting injury of all con- 
' cerned. If the San Joaquin Valley Development Association 
tdoes nothing else, let it see to it that in preparing the 
|official reading matter for the valley it does not look like 
"thirty cents." When it gets to the environs of what is sure 
|to prove the most notable historic exposition in American 
annals. 



If you will watch the Sun- 
day papers for our special 
sales each week of drugs, 
medicines, toilet articles, 
you can save considerably 
over our regular cut rates. 
Telephone orders delivered 
at once. South 356. 

S6e Owl Drug Co. 

1128 MARKET ST., S. F. 
BROADWAY 4.10TH ST., OAKLAND. 



Geo. H. Fuller Desk Co. 

REMOVAL SALE 







M^t 


RI 




M 


^j ri r iH-*-i-]r 




L 








f^ 


jrm "i'I'iJIIiW 
1 '' 1 

V \ 


Jsfl 


,^fl 



We offer our im- 
mense stock of OFFICE 
FURNITURE at greatly 
reduced prices until 
February 1st. 

638-640 niSSION ST. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending: December 31st, 1001, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three (3) per cent, per annum on all deposits, free of 
taxes, and payable on and after Thursday, January 2, 1902 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 

Selling winter stock at cost. Give in a call. Mrs. E. Jenkins. Latest 
styles in millinery. Telephone Polk 2886. 687 Geary street. 

MRS. M. HARRIS. Superflous hair and moles permanently destroyed 
with the electric needle. Terms, $3.00 an hour. Office hours, 9 to 4. 426 
Sutter street, San Francisco. 



DRESSMAKING. Prices $6.00 up. 
Fredericks on, 92S Post street. 



First-class references. Miss C. 



beauty about Jesse Moore Whiskey rs you can always 
■depend on its purity. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR AND MOLES DESTROYED. 

Madame Bollng, 407 b Hyde Street. 
Superflous hair and moles destroyed with the electric needle. Refer- 
ences eriven. Terms, $3.00 an hour. Hours 1 to 5 p. m. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. State of California. 

JAMES M. F. DAVIS. Plaintiff, vs. NETTIE DAVIS. Defendant. 

Aotion brought In the Superior Court, City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California, and the complaint filed in said City and County of San 
Francisco, in the office of the Clerk of said Superior Court. 

The People of the State of California send greeting to Nettle Davte, de- 
fendant. 

You are hereby direoted to appear and answer the complaint in an action 
entitled as above, brought against you in the Superior Court. City and 
County of San Francisco. State of California, within ten days after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within this County; or within 
thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you so appear and answer, the 
said plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of said Superior Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California, this seventeenth day of Aug- 
ust, 3901. WM. A. DFANE, Clerk. 

(Seal.) By E. M. THOMPSON, Deputy Clerk. 

NOTICE. 

The nature of the cause of action set forth in and the relief demanded by 
the above mentioned oomplaint are as follows: 

The action is brought to secure a divorce from defendant on the ground 
of'the willful desertion by the defendant of plaintiff: and the relief sought 
Is the dissolution of the bonds of matrimony now holding together plaintiff 
and defendant. 

PETER T. RILEY and J. F. RILEY, Attorneys for plaintiff, 416 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco. Cal. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 




FROM LIFE. 

Annulet Andrews in Atlantic Journal. 

'Tis a first night performance, the players 

And people are all at their best; 
Proud fashion is here in her splendor 

And folly is gorgeously dressed. 
And I, with the gods of the gallery, 

Have managed this evening to shirk 
A few hours of dull extra labor 

That fall to a government clerk. 

There's a box way down there in the distance, 

Mid music and flowers and lace, 
And in it beyond all resistance 

I find myself watching the face 
Of Nellie, the daughter of Gober 

Who made sixty millions by work 
Not so clean in the eyes of a sober 

And penniless government clerk. 

But now, Nellie ranks with the highest, 

There's a diplomat grand on her right, 
On her left there's a gorgeous tin soldier, 

Whose name, only, got in the fight — 
A soldier like those little Nellie 

And I used to play at ere Burke 
Had looked up her pedigree noble, 

To frighten a government clerk. 

Ah, Nellie, pray whom will you marry 

In all of this gorgeous array? 
Mr. Sing Loo, of China? a Russian? 

A Pole or a Monsieur Francais? 
A Greek? an Italian? Korean? 

Perhaps an unspeakable Turk? 
A titled though wooly Ligian, 

You'll prefer to a government cleric. 

Perchance you will sit in the future 

Upon the right hand of the lord 
Whom you bought with your glittering millions. 

You will live la high fashion abroad. 
Your dresses, you: jewels, your babies. 

Your castles will fall to the work 
Of the fellows who know not you promised 

Yourself to a government clerk. 

Yes, Nellie, you look in your splendor 

As you did in your white pinafore 
When you swept up the yard and your mother 

Washed clothes at the old cabin door. 
Your eyes keep the blue of the mountains, 

Your lips have the same saucy perk, 
As of yore when you drank from the dipper 

With a poor little government clerk. 

The curtain has dropped and the people 

Are solemnly moving away; 
I believe 'twas a splendid performance, 

Yet I was not watching the play. 
I was thinking — "Oh, Jack, you are cruel, 

I love you," a whisper, a j rk 
At my heart, Nellie's hand on my shoulder. 

Makes a king of the government clerk. 



SEA-FOG. 

Seribnerp. 

There is a ghost that walks the sea to-night! 
I marked him in the twilight, hovering 
Beyond the marshes; a gray, misshapen Thing 

To chill the very soul with nameless fright. 

And as a flock of startled birds takes wing 
Before the fowler, so, in sudden flight, 
I saw the fisher-boats from left and right 

Hurrying to harbor; and I heard the ring 

Of warning bells, and then the beacon hurled 
Its javelin of fire into the dark 

And made a space of refuge for who saw. 

Whereon, my own being safe, the outer world 

Passed from my thought. Alas, the narrow arc 
On Life's full round that tightened heartstrings 
draw! 



The 
Tribune 



NEWSPAPER NOTE 

OAKLAND'S 



GREAT 

EVENING 

NEWSPAPER 



|«2 managed, for San 

13 Francisco advertising business, 
by F. R. Porter, whom 
consult; tariff inviting. 
9 Powell street, Columbia 
Theatre Building, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

ESTATE OF GILES S. BROWN, also known as G. S. BROWN. De- 
ceased. 

Notice Is hereby Kiven by the undersigned. GEORGIE BROWN, Execu- 
trix of the Inst will and testament of D ceased, to the creditors of, and all 
persons having cluia,s apninsi the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
neeeBS.ry vouchers, within four mouth' after the first publication of tin , 
notice, to the said GEOHGIE BROWN, Executrix, at the office of J. P. 
RILEY. Attorncy-at-Law, Rooms 55 to 58. -116 t alifornin street. Han Fran- 
cisco, California, the same heine her place lor the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 

GEORGIE BROWN. 
Executrix of the last will and testament of GILES S. BROWN, also 

known as a. S. BROWN, Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco. December 23. 1901, 

J. F. RILEY, 
Attorney for Executrix. 416 California street. Rooms 55-68. 



Gray Bros. 



228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 
205 New High Street, Los AngeleB. 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 




ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 



423 Post street, between Powell and Mason. 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1328 



W. E. Bridge. 1 rru.rletor. 



BLAKE. MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Blake, Moffit &. Towne Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall & Co. Pur»'»nd Or 



Telephone Main 199. 

DEALERS IN PAPER 

5-57-69-61 First street 8. F 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA 
BITTERS, the great 
Mexican remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 

IVpot at :<23 M.irket St.. San Francisco. Sena for circular 

Pacific Towel Company no. 9 lick place 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels $1 per month; 12 hand or 
roller towels 8l 50 per month. Tel. Main 1780. 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET, 

Directors— A dolph C. Weber. President; W.J. Lowry, Vice-President; 
W. S. Keyes; I. Kolin; G. H. Luchainerer. 
A. D. Keyes and 0. E. Hatch, attorneys; Ernest Brand, Secretary, 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, 8. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1901... *28,973,540 Reserve Fund tX26,99 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 445,617 

W. O. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
Q. Miller, Robert Watt, Gooree C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In cheeks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co. 'a Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility ol this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entranoe fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only 6:30 lo H o'clock. 



E. B. POND. President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



January 18. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



BAN 
London and San Francisco Bank, uxm 

04 CALIFORNIA HTRKRT. 
HB^n OPFirp.-TI Lombard strevt. Ixmdon. 

c»pli»l Authorised. to.3rt-i.cn>. QftplbU Paid Dp, tl.400.ooo. 

t»ir«ctor»— Henry Ooechen. Chairman. London; <1iri"iUn de Oul»tir . 
**n Francisco: Cbarlee Hemery, Ix>mlnn; .'<>hn L, Howard, 9an Fran- 
•Ueo: Bendli Koppel. I>ondon : (ireriilc tfontey Palmer. Lo nd o n ; EVotraii 
D. RIdeoul. 9an Frmndwco: Arthur Scrivener. f <ondon. 

Inapeetor ol Branches. Gustar Friederlc v 

Areata In New York. Maaara. J. P. Morgan A Co. 

BRANrllEH: Portland. Orecon: Tncoiua, Wash.. Seattle. Waah- 

l*([«n ol credit l*aued available for trarelera and the purchase of mer- 
chandise in any city ol the world. I>eal In lorelrn and domesllo excha n ee 
Accounta ol country banks received. Terms on application. 

A. L. Black. Ctuhler W. Mackintosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With whloh li amalgamated The Bank ol British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000- Reserve Fund, t2.000.000. 

A«rre«ate Resources over $65,000,000. 

Hon- Goo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

J. H. PI u turner, Asat. General Mauaeer- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St-. E C, 3. Cameron Alexander. Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— If. Exchange Plaoe, Alex. Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: U BRANCHES. 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse; British Columbia: At] In. Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Eamloops. Nanatmo, Nelson, New Westminster. Sandon, 
Vancouver, Victoria- In the United SlateB— New York, N. Y. San Fian- 
olaoo. Cal- Seattle, Waah- Portland, Ore- Skaeway, Alaska. 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agent* In Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents 1n New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franoisco Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalna, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N, W. Cob. Salome and Suttkb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 12,600,000 Pald-Up Capital. t2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, H.000.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— MeBsra. Lazard Freres A de, 17 

Boulevard Polssoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, Manager. 
B. ALTSOHTJL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Franoisco 
Jao. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Co wgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe. Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $500,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $130,000. 

DIREOTORS-James K. Wilson, Wm. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Plerue. O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City-First National Bank. London--* 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St.. San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TEUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS Carefully Selected 

for our clients. 

Officers — F. Kronenberg, President; W- A- Frederick, Vice-President; H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Dlreotors — F. Kronenberg, W. A- Frederlok, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A, Denioke, A. G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued. Fred C. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LLLLENTHAL. Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomebt St Mills Building. 



KING. 

Wells Fargo & Company Bank 
ggr ... gswgE^ . . ■ . as esse 

■••I. "whirr. . II. I. Mll.LK« H... I'r.ncl.co 

8MHCHES- n»,.tI.»k«. . . .,. ,.;. | , v aSSn 

IPobtland. Oe. . . B.I.uBum.tUl 

Statement of Condition at Close of Business, July 31, 1901. 

boon ASSETS 

Berate Btrok. and Warrants "S JJl Srw 

k.-»i Batata " iMolmS"?? 

Hlrosllaneooa Amu ttuaM 

Hue Irom Hank! and Banker. ] mSeS 

f *"" 3,'973!(i76!(M 

LIABILITIES »».™.™m 

SSISS; •» ooo.ono.oo 

surplus . 7 . jyjn n.. 

Undivided Profits ."an MOM 

Deposits. Banks and Bankers , 112,16527 

" Individual ™_™ ^.'^jra 

$19,589,558.17 
.i. Go ,'^ era ,!. b, " , ? ln|r b,,sln<!s8 In all Its branohes. Correspondents throughout 
the World. Aocounts received on favorable terms. 



INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 



WllllemAlvord 
William Babooek 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 

W. 8. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoOutobea 
K. H. Pease 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. j2.000.0O0. 

Surplus, $1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits. January 1, 1912. $2,889,310.05. 

XS^SJi ALVORr> .President! THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vice-Pren't I. P. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CI.AY Secretary I SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Latdlaw A Co. ; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia. Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit issued, available in all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,316,381.43 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits December 31. 1901 30.766,038.17 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Beoker: First Vice-President 
John Lloyd: Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann. Ign, Steinhart, H. B. Rubs, Emil Rohte, N Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Sec- 
retary. George Tourny: Assistant Seoretary, A. H. Midler: General Attor 
ney, W. S. Goodie] ] ow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

S3 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $800,000 

.Iamus D. Phelan, President S. G. Muephy. Vice-President 

Geobqb A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, 8. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald, Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Welle, Fargo A Co., or Exohange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OP CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. 912,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund.. .8260,000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Pueposk is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members erlvi tie; first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate ol 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, General Manager 

Crocker-WoolWorth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANOISCO 
Oobnbb Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Orooker, President Gbo. W. Kline. Cashier 

O. E. Green. Vice-President W. Gbeoo. Jb.. Assistant Cashle 

Directors— W. H, Crocker, B. B Pond, George Orooker, O. E, Green, G. W 
Kline. Henry J. Orooker. G. W. Seott 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



THE SECOND PHOTOGRAPHIC SALON. 

Last year the San Francisco Art Association and the Cali- 
fornia Camera Club held a photographic exhibit at the Hop- 
kins Institute of Art, and it met with such success that it 
has been repeated this year with a marked improvement Id 
the quality of work. Four hundred and fifty photographs 
are shown, and among them are many brilliant examples 
of the great strides that photography has taken in the past 
few years. There are a few of the class that were acceptable 
when photography was a trade, but happily only a few. 

While most of the exhibitors are Californians, the show- 
ing is very cosmopolitan. The Eastern States are well 
represented, and photographers in England, France, Italy 
and other European countries have sent many pictures. 

Dr. Arnold Genthe has some of the most remarkable in 
the collection, surpassing even his exhibit of last year. 
His work is mostly in the portrait line, several theatrical 
notables being among his studies. His "Challenge," a laugh- 
ing portrait of Fritzie Seheff, the opera singer, is startling 
in merit — life-like, artistic in pose and soft yet firm in hand- 
ling. His portrait of Mr. Walter Damrosch is as simple as 
anything could be — merely a profile. Yet it is superbly 
posed and is as soft and shadowy as a painting. He has one 
or two Chinatown scenes that are rich in color and excellent 
in composition. His portrait of Mr. Bispham as "Wotan" 
is admirable. 

Mr. W. J. Street, of this city, has several outdoor studies 
which show careful study and high appreciation of the 
value of composition. His pictures range along the coast 
from Monterey to San Francisco. His "Bit of Water Front," 
while admirable in light and shade, shows too much fore- 
ground for good composition. 

Miss Laura Adams is advancing much in portraiture, ex- 
hibiting several studies of rare merit. 

There are too many exhibitors for detailed mention, but 
they are ail worthy of commendation. The Camera Cluo 
and the Art Association are to be congratulated on their 
success. 



The Reliance Athletic Club of Oakland will give a boxing 
night on the evening of Friday, January 24th, which should 
be productive of some rare sport. A double bill has been 
arranged: in which Tommy Gilfeather and Willie Snailham 
at 115 pounds, and "Doc" Flynn and Toby Irwin at 135 
pounds, will go fifteen rounds. As a preliminary to these 
events "Cyclone" Kelly and Tom Woods, of Los Angeles, will 
box at 154 pounds. This is the best card the club has offered 
Jor some time, and those who attend will be well repaid for 
their trip across the bay. 



The firm of Madison & Burke, which has been in the real 
estate business in town for forty-eight years, has again been 
compelled to move by the increase of its business. New 
offices at 30 Montgomery street, fitted up especially for them, 
were occupied this week, and they are now in the finest real 
estate offices in the city. 



The Examiner tells us in tearful type that Miss Laura 
Lambert, the candy girl who had her hair torn out from the 
roots, is followed by an evil fate. Last week her house 
caught fire and her wig was reduced to ashes. Laura ought 
to get wise by experience and have her wig insured. 



The Marin County Grand Jury, in denouncing pool selling 
and the Biter baby farm, cannot be said to have made any 
original discoveries. 



Trunks and Valises. 
Another carload of Trunks. Valises, Dress Suit Cases, 
Traveling Sets at our famous car-load prices. All kinds of 
leather goods in this department lettered in gold letters, 
free of charge. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



The new vintage of Mumm's Extra Dry Champagne, 

even more delicate and heady than the '93 and similar to the 
'99. is now on the market, and immense reserves guarantee 
the maintenance of its quality. 




Prizes 

Ca^tcK 

many women. 
What do prizes 
a.mo\mt to 7 Not 
worth consid- 
ering. Cannot 
pay yo\i for 
poorer work, 
greater ex- 
pense &nd 
risk to clothes, 
which you get with 
an inferior wash- 
ing powder. Any woman who 
uses PEARLINE has a prize, 
and will save enough to buy 
more and better knick-knacks. 

Pea.rlirve Saves 6 " 



Mrs. S. T. Rorer, 
in "Table Talk," 
says regarding 
Washing Powders: 
"Many housekeep- 
ers object to these 
'quiet workers' on 
the plea that they 
rot the clothing. 
This is, of course, 
not true, unless you 
purchase cheap 
powders, and even 
then I doubt if the 
everlasting rub- 
bing, which one can 
hear to the very top 
of the house, does 
not do by far great- 
er injury." 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
the best for all purposes. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

For the six months ending December 31. 190'. dividends bave been de- 
clared on deposits in the f-avings Department of this Company, as follows; 
On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of 3 per cent, per annum, free of taxes, and payable on 
and after Thursday. January 2, 1902. Dividends uncalled for are added to 
the principal snd bear the same rate of divid-nd as the principal from and 
after January 1, 1902. J. HALZELL BROWN. Manager. 

Office — Corner California and Montgomery Sireeis. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Bonrd of Directors of Ibis society, held thi*. 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-eighth (3%) 
per cent per annum on all depo-its for the six months ending December 
31, 1901; free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2. 1902. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones street, San Francisco. Cal. 

December 30, 1901. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The board f directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1901, at the rate ot three and one-eighth 18K) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, and payable on n'id after J-immry 2, 1902. Divi- 
dends not called fur are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the 
principal from and after January 1, ltoj, 

CYKtJS W. CAR.MANY, Cashier. 

Office— llll Montgomery street, corner Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
San Francisco Gas and Electric Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco Gas and 
Electric Company will be held at the office of the company, 415 Post street, 
In the City and County of San I- rancisco, at 12 o'clock M , on Tuesday, 
January 21st. 1902. The transfer books of the company will be closed from 
January 10th, 1902, to and Including January 21st, 1902. (Signed) 

WILLIAM G. BARRETT, Secretary. 

Dated San Francisco, January 6, 1902. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Challenge Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal plaee of business, San Francisco, California. Lo 
cation of works — Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 9th day of January, 1902, an assessment (No 33) of 5 cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stook of the coiporation, pa' able immediately 
in Ui.ited Sales gold coin, to ttie Secretary, at the office of ihe company, 
room 35, third floor. Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and Montgom- 
ery streets. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this issessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 12TH DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1902. 
will be deemed delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Wednesday, the 5th day 
of Marcii. 1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direc ors, 

C. L. McCOY. Secretary. 

Office— Room No. 35, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and 
Montgomery streets, San Francii-co, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE." 
Andes Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California- Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia City, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby iriven that a meetlnc of the Board of Directors, held on 
the thirteenth day of January, 1902, an asses»m**ni (No. 55) of live (5) o-nta 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately, in United Sates erold coi", to the Secretary. »t ihe office of 
the company, rooms 21 and 22. Nevada Block, .1119 MontRomery street, Sm 
Francisco, California. 

Any stook upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 15T1I DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1902, 
will he delinquent and advertised for sate at public auction; and unless 
payment is made before will he sold on Friday, the Seventh day of Maron, 
1902, at 1 o'clock p. m,, to pay ihe delinquent assessment, together with 
the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of (he Board Ol 
Directors, J. HIM. \V. TWIGGS, Sec clary. 

Office— Rooms 21 and 22, Nevada BI«.<U, 809 Monttromory street. San Fran- 
cisco. California. 



January 18. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ib 



SUNBEAMS. 

*n from Till' 

"I don't know who the man was. but 
no stool under Rolshovin's dock near 
midnight last night. Me was talking to 
himself. I lingered at the window just 
tiough to hear him utter this bit 
of philosophy: What's the use" What 
docs It all amount to? A fellow is born 
and somebody supports him for a while. 
Then be supports himself for awhile 
longer. Then he supports somebody 
else a while. He goes to a few shows. 
Then he dies. That's all.' " 

Old Sally, on her death bed, was an 
unconscious humorist. On being asked 
by the vicar if she felt quite happy, the 
old lady said, with great unction: "Oh, 
yes. Ah s'all soon be in Jacob's 
bosom.'' "Abraham's bosom. Sally,' 
corrected the vicar. "Aye well, mebbe 
it is. but if you'd been unmarried for 
slity-fahve year, leyke what Ah 'ev 
ya wudn't be particular wheeas bosom 
it war. seca lang ez ya got inti sum- 
body's." 

She— There is a great deal of unfair- 
ness in this world. Women are barred 
out of society for things that men may 
do with immunity. He — That may be 
true, but on the other hand, men would 
be barred out of society if they did some 
things that women do with impunity 
every day. She — I'd like to have you 
name just one of them. He — Well, kiss- 
ing other people's wives and daughters 
and sweethearts, for instance. 

Two little boys were invited out to 
tea at the house of a third little boy, 
and their mother told them that if there 
were cakes for tea to only take one 
each. At the tea-table a plate of very 
tiny cakes was passed around. Freddy, 
the elder boy, looked at the diminutive 
"baby" cakes a moment, and then took 
two, saying, as he did so, to his little 
brother: "You maj take two, Willie. 
I'm sure mamma didn't think they would 
be so very small." 

"And now " Nero bent his glance 

toward imperial Rome in flames, and 
twanged the E string carefully to see if 

his instrument was in tune . "I'll 

give 'em some appropriate music!" 
Bringing down the bow with a flourish, 
he soon had the quick strains of 
"There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old 
Town To-night" quivering from his vio- 
lin. 






■?tty*r\ 



Don't tie the top of your 

"Jelly and preserve jars in 
theold fashioned way. Seal 
them by the new, quick, 
absolutely sure way— by 
a thin coating of Pure 
Refined Paraffine. Has 
no taste or odor. Is 
air tight and acid 
proof. Easily applied. 
Useful in adozaii other 
' ways about tho house. 
Full directions with 
each cake. 
Bold everywhere. Made by 
STANDARD OIL CO. 




Butlers in best families and all first class 
cooks can tell vou that soups, fish, meats, 
gravy, game, salads and many other dishes 
are given an appetising relish if flavored 
k Per 



Ml 
rTl 



with Lea 



rrins' sauce. 



Returned Tourist — Mr. Hayseed, 1 
met your runaway son in the West. 
He has become a very successful Chi- 
cago drummer. Farmer Hayseed — 
Must 'a been some other feller, mister. 
My son had no car fer music, and 
couldn't keep time to a tune to save 
his neck. He hadn't nothin' 'cept cheek 
and impudence. 

Wife — There's a burglar down in the 
cellar, Henry. Husband— Well, my dear, 
we ought to be thankful that we are up- 
stairs. Wife — But he'll come up here 
Husband — Then we'll go down in the 
cellar, my dear. Surely a ten-room 
house ought to be big enough to hold 
three people without crowding. 

Dear John: A kind friend has sent me 
word that you are painting things red 
at home during my vacation. That is 
lovely. Did you intend it as a surprise 
for me? You know red was always my 
favorite color. Be sure to do it properly. 
Your loving wife." 

"This is jest a gentle hint," observed 
the farmer, whose son had come home 
from college, as he slips a hoe and rake 
into a golf-bag. "How's that?" "Well, 
when he feels he needs exercise, he 
kin go to his golf bag an' find out jest 
how he kin git some!" 

Young Promisemuch (whose salary 
is- $3,000) — Don't you think if a girl 
really loves she'd be willing to marry, 
without expecting every luxury? Ro- 
mantic Maiden — I'd rather marry a man 
with an income of $10,000 a year than 
a millionaire I didn't love. 

Mrs. Clancey (boastfully) — My hus- 
band was wan o' the pallbearers at 
Callahan's funeral. Mrs. Casey (spite- 
fully) — Aye! An' well-fitted fur the job 
he was. He's used to carryin' the bier 
that some wan Use pays fur. 

Mrs. Kelley — Did yez hear of the fel- 
ley ochrosht the way dyin' of Anglo- 
phobia? Mrs. Googan — Yez mean hy- 
drophobia. Mrs. Kelley — No; I mean 
Anglophobia! He wuz cheerin' fer King 
Edward, an' de gang heerd him! 

Magistrate (to prisoner) — Have you 
any visible means of support? Prisoner 
— Yes, your honor. (To his wife, a 
laundress) — Bridget, stand up so that 
the coort kin see yez. 

She — You do not tell me that you love 
me any more. I am sure there can be 
no reason for your remissness. He — No? 
She — No. You ought to be as good a 
liar now as you ever were. 

School Teacher — Now, Bobby, spell 
needle. Bobby — N-e-i-d-1-e, needle. 
Teacher — Wrong. There is no "i" in 
needle. Bobby — Well, 'taint a good 
needle, then. 

Downer — I am very glad it is good 
form not to wear a watch with a dress- 
suit. Upper — Why? Downer — Because 
I never have my watch and dress-suit 
at the same time. 



"What is the name of the President of 
your country.'' said the visitor. "I don't 
know." answered the citizen of the 
South American republic. "We haven't 
yet had a full report from the latest 
battle." 



"I hope you appreciate the fact, sir. 
that in marrying my daughter you 
marry a large-hearted, generous girl?" 
"I do, sir," (with emotion) "and I hope 
she inherits those qualities from her 
father." 



First Office Boy — Wot's Chimmey cry- 
ing fer? Second Office Boy — His 
grandmudder's dead and going to be 
buried on a holiday! 



He — Darling, we'll have a lot to con- 
tend with when we are married. She — 
Yes, dear, we'll have each other. 



"I'm eighty years old and never 
smoked in my life. "Well, don't get dis- 
couraged: you probably will afterward." 



Havers — Ain't Lovidove and his wife 
devoted to each other? Jabbers — Yes, 
the hypocrites! 



Father — But do tell me, Alfred, how 
could you fail again? Son — Well, you 
see, we had another examination. 



For 

78 Years 

Standard of the world; 
to-day superior to any 
piano manufactured ..•* 





New styles 






just received 




Benj 


Curtaz 

SOLE AGENTS 
16 to 20 O'Farrell St 


& Son 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



CONTEMPORARY TAKE-OFFS 



The Modern Fable of the Rector Who would be a Social 
Mentor. 



By Jo. R. Jade. 



Once there was a Rector named Rev. Dr. Charles Wilbur 
De Lyon Nichols, who lived in a Struggling Parish and had 
Advanced Ideas. His Church was Eminently Respectable, 
and that was largely what was the Matter with it. He got 
his Salary out of the Collection Plate, and when the Weekly 
Simoleons aggregated over a Five Spot, the Parishioners 
kicked, because he was Overdrawing his Salary. The Parson 
realized that this was Slender Picking, but when he Pon- 
dered on the Great Frost of the Outside World he Clamped 
his Ivories and hung On. About this Period in the Game an 
Elderly Admirer of the Reverend Doctor Fanned Out 
of this 'Vale of Tears and Bequeathed her Wad to a 
Reckless Nephew who Flew the Precinct to Pastures New, 
thus reducing the Sabbath Offering to Four Solitary Plunks. 

This was a Heavy Jolt for the Rector, who got Languid 
and began to Long for Higher Things. He made up his mind 
that there was more Spondulix in Degeneracy than in 
Preaching, so he wrote a Boudoir Romance entitled "The 
Decadents," but as the Publishers kept it Quiet, the Rector 
maintained his Job, although the Job steadily refused to 
Maintain the Rector. This made the Reverend Gentleman 
Warm about the Clericals, so, Stuffing his Telescope, he 
piked over to New York to see his Crony, Ward McAllister, 
and find out what was Wrong with American Society. When 
he Braced Up to the McAllister Hostelry he was told that 
the Arbiter Elegantarium had 400 Things to Worry about, 
but that a $1.95 Subscription Book on Our First Families 
would do just as well. The Parson accepted the Volume and 
worked his Pass back to Nichols, Conn., where he proceeded 
to do some Tall Reading. And as he read he had a Beatific 
Vision of the Long-sought-for Graft. 

"Once I was blind, but now I am on," exclaimed the Rev. 
Dr. Charles Wilbur De Lyon Nichols. "The American 
Genealogical Tree comes High, but we Must Have it. This 
little Tome which I peruse contains 400 names which have 
been paid for at So Much per. Farewell, little Pulpit in 
Nichols, Conn., a good Graft is better than a thousand 
Sermons. I will make Aristocracy a Close Corporation that 
will cost you your Pile to come in, then I will lay low and 
Pull In the Dividends." 

Thereat the Divine retired to his Chambers and began to 
Hammer the Typewriter. He explained that New York's 
400 was about 394 Overestimated, and that the Real Aristo- 
crat was a fast disappearing Species, and was quoted at a 
high figure in the Museums. He further Averred that the 
First Families of Virginia were Exploded Eggs, and hinted 
that those who make Money in the Stock Market are not 
always of Royal Blood. 

When he had strung off about forty front feet of this 
Brand h3 took it to a Job Printer and had sixty Copies 
Published. Then he sent One to each of the Genuine Nobil- 
ity in the country and kept Two for himself. He waited un- 
til the Harvest Moon for the Literature to Soak In, then he 
repaired to Giddy Gotham with the intention of Collecting. 
There were but six Aristocrats in the City, so the Gentleman 
of the Cloth decided to Brace them for a Good Stiff Price. 
So accordingly he Blew in to the Brownstone of Aristocrat 
Number One, but when the Footman met him at the Door 
he Blew out with considerable more decision than that 
with which he had Come. At the Kremlin of Aristocrat 
Number Two he got as far as the Star Chamber where the 
Lady Bountiful handed him the Strenuous Mitt and bade him 
Avaunt to the Rear Pew. Number Three was ominously not 
at Home, and Our Hero was considerably Jarred to find that 
Numbers Four and Five were Hob-Nobbing with the 394 Mere 
Outsiders at Newport. 

It was with considerable Trepidation that the Minister ap- 
proached the Buckingham Palace of Number Six. The Cur- 
tains were drawn and the Doors boarded up, but at his Sum- 
mons an Elderly Party with a Calliope Wheeze bobbed up. 

"I am looking for the Master of the House," said the 
Gospel Expert. 

"The Mogul of this Establishment was wafted to the 



Bone Orchard ten years ago," explained the Wheezy Warden 
as he slammed the Portal. 

"Too bad," exclaimed the Priest. "He was the only Genu- 
ine Gentleman in New York!" 

The Rev. Dr. Charles Wilbur De Lyon Nichols is now 
located in the Tall Timber, where he is waiting for his 
Chum, William Waldorf Astor, to send him a Patent of Nobil- 
ity and a Steerage Ticket to Liverpool. 

Moral. — Those who monkey with the Blue Book do so at 
their own Risk. 



Feeding to Fit 
is the problem with infants. The growing child has ever 
changing needs, but a perfect milk can never go amiss. 
Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is the acme of sub- 
stitute feeding. Send 10c. for "Baby's Diary." 71 Hudson 
street, N. Y. 



Strangers always express surprise when entering the 

Techau Tavern, the handsomest and cosiest place in San 
Francisco. It is society's favorite resort. 



College San Ratael 

For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dom- 
inic. Opens August 1, 1901. Full col- 
lege course of studies. Modern Build- 
ing; steam heated. Unsurpassed for 
beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

nolleee San Rafael, flan Rafael. fl» 1 



Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 



(Formerly In Milts Building 



Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL MILL" 

Devotes Its entire revenue to the embellishment of its grounds. Burials 
are continuing as heretofore- Plots and Graves lor Sale, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perpetual care of same. Within 20 minutes of Kearny Street. 
Many street car lines pass the gate. 

Tel west 68. Bush and Central Ave., San Francisco 



J. C. Zellerbach 



A. Zellerbach 



Paper 



A. ZELLERBACH 
& SONS 

4J6to 426 Sansome Street, n. s. cot. Commeroiai 

419 to 423 Clay Street 

418 and 420 Commercial Street 



TEL MAIN 113. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and Manufacturer of 



Artificial Stone 



(Schilllnger's Patent) in all its branches. Sidewalk 
and garden walk a specialty. 



Office, 307 Montgomery Street. Nevada Block. 



San Francisco 



r> n-l-%^-k.*T For barbers, bakers, bootblaoks, bath-houses, billiard 
\}i USllvvS tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, oannere 
l - / *-*— '■ ■v-'.j dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners. laMers, etc. 

BUCHANAN BRUS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St., S. F. Tel., 661 



January 18. 1*02. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



a 



OUR. MUSICAL CITY. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



Being an Imaginary Meeting of San Francisco's Rulers. 



SCENE — City Hall. Discovered Mayor SchmiU. First Super 
visor. Second Supervisor. Third Supervisor, and others 
who. not being of the Labor Party, don't count: and 
First. Second and Third Citizens. Mayor SchmiU raises 
his baton and calls for order, whistling a few bars of a 
song written by himself and entitled. "No One Was 
More Surprised than Me." The Supervisors join in the 
chorus, then the First Supervisor takes the floor, reading 
from a speech which an Examiner reporter had prepared 
for him. 

"Mr. Schmitz — I mean Mayor SchmiU — I wish to suggest 
a reform In our street car system. The bells by whicn 
minings are sounded are unmusical and inartistic. I have 
lain awake nights figuring out a change which would be 
satisfactory, and have concluded that for the artistic and 
musical good of this city each car should be equipped with 
a bugler, who should toot at each crossing, and " 

The Second Supervisor jumped to his feet. "Ladies and 
gentlemen." he shouted, "why a bugler? Why not a drum- 
mer? I have a son who is a most beautiful drummer, and 
liside of three or four months he could have a corps of drum- 
mers trained, one for each car in town." 

"Who'd pay for instructions for these drummers — the city 
or the street-car companies?" asked the Third Supervisor. 

"I don't give a darn who pays for them," said the other, 
"but my son needs the money." 

"Now, look here." said the First Supervisor, "I object to all 
this flub-dub. Who wants to have an these drums thunder- 
ing along the streets? Besides, they'd take up too much 
room. My plan is to build a little platform in front of each 
car, where a bugler could stand and indicate by his calls 
what ear he was on. On a dark night, for instance, a man 
is standing on a corner waiting for a Castro-street car. One 
comes along and the bugler blows, 'Rooty-toot-toot,' and in- 
dicates a Castro-street car. If he blows 'Tooty-toot-root' it 
means a Haight-street car, and so on with all the others. 
When a pedestrian is run over he plays 'The Holy City.' I've 
a father who has a whole storeful of bugles which he will 
sell at ten per cent discount." 

"I move," said the Third Supervisor, "that whether drums 
or bugles are used, an ordinance be passed regulating the 
wages of the players at eight dollars per day, double price 
on Sundays." 

The Second Supervisor was on his feet by this time, nearly 
exploding, when MJayor Schmitz, raising his baton, said: 

"Gentlemen, I think I can settle this thing very easily. 
I suggest that there be a bugler in front of each car and a 
drummer in the rear, and that they be allowed to make out 
their own requisitions for salaries." 

This was assented to with applause. The First, Second 
and Third Citizens walked sadly out, calculating how long 
it would be until next election, while Mayor Schmitz, pick- 
ing up his violin, played a little composition of his own, 
entitled "If I were King." W. J. W. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter journey across the continent. 



There's only one "best" whiskey, and that is Argo- 
naut. No other has its incomparable taste and consistency. 
It cheers but does not inebriate, and leaves no bad effects. 
It is the very essence of purity, and its age but adds to its 
good qualities. E. Martin & Co., 54 First street, are sole 
agents for the "United States. 

When champagne is spoken of it is always understood 

that Mumm's is the kind meant. It is the standard by 
which wines are judged. 

Why experiment with other brands when you can get Jesse 

Moore Whiskey at all times and places? 



THK Terr wnur o| the Hlr. onnr.nl.ot 10 
lUI the Mr slarsa aod »ll dImm. of iniimnn 1 
European plan. Ii m U»r iuiiI upward*. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(OppoftlU Mkdlimn Sanftre Park) 
PlnftHl oafo In thU ill v. 



Hilton Robltt. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont. BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

Ne w York Gity 

A Hitch ClaftB Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on tin: Kuropenn 
plan nt moderate ratts. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Qdinn, Proprietor. 

Mortimer M. Kelly, Manager 







f8R : '^ 


la 







RIGGS HOUSE 

Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 

of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. O. 6 
Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

PARAISO HOT SPRINGS 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 

Monterey County, Cal. C. T. Romio, Proprietor 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Win. B, Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, lor 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



BALDWIN ANNEX 

CAFE AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

926-928-930 Market Street and 56 Ellis Street. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Everydellcatessen 

Domestic nnd Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389. 

'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in.* 



—Dr. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEIS & SON Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 

Send lor Pamphlet, 418 Sacramento Street. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 



lbavk] 



Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

From December 6, 1901 



[arbivb 



7:00 a Benieia, Suisun, Elmira, and Sacramento 6:55 P 

7:00 A Vacavtlle. Winters, Rumaey 7:55 p 

7:30 A Martinez, Ran Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoea, Santa Rosa... 6: 5 p 

8:00 A Davis, Woodland. Knights Landing:. Marysville. Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 a Atlantic Express, Oeden and East 8: 5 A 

8:00 A Nlles. Lathrop. Stooston 7;2fi p 

8:00a Nlles. Mendota, Hanlord. Vlsalia, PortervUle..... 4:55 p 

8:30a hhaata Express — Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Sprtmcs). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff, Portland 7:55 p 

8:30 A San Jose. Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville, 

Marysville, Chico. Red Bluff. 4:5 P 

8:30a Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne... • 4: 5 P 

9 00 a Haywards, Nlles. and way stations .'11:55 A 

9:00a Vallejo 1: & p 

9:00 a Lob Aneeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. FreBno, and Los Angeles 7:55 A 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Oeden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 5 :& P 

tl:00 p Sacramento River Steamers I" :00 p 

3:00 p Benlcla, WlnterB, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landing 

Marysville. Orovllle 0:55 A 

3:30 P Haywards, Nlles. and way stations 7:55 P 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa, Calls toga, Santa Rosa 9:55 P 

4 :00 p NlleB, Livermore, Stockton, Lodt 1 ; 5 1 

4:30p Haywards, Nlles, San Jose, Livermore t8:55 A 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare, Bakersfield, Saugus for 

5:00 p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton ( f A 

5:00 p Martinez, Antlooh, Stookton, Merced, Fresno :* P 

6:00 p Haywards, Nlles. and San Jose 7:55 A 

tfl:00p Vallejo I / 

6:00 P Oriental Mall— Oarden, Denver, Omaha, St, Louis, Chicago... 4:5 P 
7:00 P Oregon and California Express — Sacramento, Marysville. Red- 
ding, Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 pan Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations : 5 a 

t8:05 p Vallejo 7:55 P 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauce). (Footof Market St.) 

8:15 A Newark. Centervllle. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 P 

t2:15 P Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 

oer Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4 :15 P Newark, San Jose, Los Oatos t«:50 a 

09:30 p Hunters' Train — San Jose and way stations $7:20 P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a.m. 1:00,3:00.5:15, P.M. 

From Oakianp— Footof Broadway.— 16:00. t8:00. t8:05. 10:00 A. M. 12:00, 
2:00, 4:00p. M, 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 A San Jose and way stations 6:40 A 

7:00 A San Jose and way stations tS:00 p 

/7:00a New Almaden /4:l0 P 

8:00 A Coast Line Limited— San Jo«e, Gllroy. Salinas. San Luis 
Obispo, Santa Bdrbi'ii, Los Angeles and Principal intermedi- 
ate tttations 10:45 p 

9:00 a San Jose, Tres Pinos Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas. San 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations 4:10 p 

10:30 a San Jose and way stations 8:^6 a 

ll : 30 a San Jose and wav stations 9:46 a 

t2:45 p Pan Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara.San 
Jose. Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove t!0:45 A 

3:30 P San Jose and way stations . 1:30 p 

t4:15 P San Jose and principal way stations 5:30 p 

4:50 P Sunset Limited — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, for Los An- 
geles, EI Paso, New Orleans and New York. Arrives Sun- 
days. Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:15 a 

t5:00 P San Jose. Los Gatos, and principal way stations t9:00 a 

5:30 P San Jose and principal way stations 6:30 p 

6:30 p San Jobo and way stations 7:30p 

7:00 P New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los 

Angeles, Demlng, El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:30 A 

all:45 p San Jose and way stations 7:30p 

a for Morning. P for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 

1 Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
Information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wbarf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p.m., fo r 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with Bteamera (or India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, Jannary2l. 1902 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, February 15, 1902 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday. March 13, 1902 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 8, 1902 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
Corner First. D. D. STL7BB3, General Manager . 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Lessees S. F. and N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibckon Fkeey — Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30. 9:00. 11:00 A.M.: 12:3.5. 3:30. 5:10. 6:30 p.m. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.m. Haturdays— Extra trips atl:50 andll:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30, 11:00 a.m.; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00. 6:20 p.m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10. 7:50. 9:20. 11:10 a.m.: 12:15. 3:40, 5:10 p.m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 3:10.9:10 11:10 a.m., 1:40,3:10 5:05. 6:25 P.M. 

Between San Francisco and SchuetZen Part, same schedule as above. 



Leave San 1 


r ranclsco 

Sundays 
8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 Pm 


In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 


ArrtveatSan Francisco 


Week days | 
7:30 a m 
3:30 pm 
5:10 PM 1 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa Ro*a 


Sundays 
10:40 ah 
6105 pm 
7:35 PM 

7135 PM 


1 Week days 
1 8:4Uam 
10:25 am 
1 -i: PM 


7:30 am 1 
3:30 Pu 1 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Heal deb tire. Lytton, 

Geyeervllle, Clo.erdale 


1 10:25 AM 
1 6:22 PM 


7=30 AM 1 


8:00 AM 


Hopland.TJklah 


7135 PM 


1 :-. 


7:30 AH 1 

3:30Pm | 


8.00 AM 


Guernevllle 


7:35 PM 


1 10:25 AM 


7:30 am I 
5:10 p M 1 


8:00 am 
5:00 Pm 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


9:15 AH 

6:u6 PM 


I 8:10 AM 
| PM 


7:30 AM 1 
3:30 PM I 


8:00 am 
5:00 PM 


Sebastopol 


10 HO AM 
7:35 pm 


1 10:25 AM 

1 f>:22 PM 





SS "Alameda." lor Honolulu, Sat.. Jan. 25, 2p,m: 
SS "Sierra." for Australia, Thurs. Feb. 6, 10 ft. m. 
line to Ooolgardie, Australia, and Capetown. 
South Africa, 

J. D. SPRECKELS&BROS.CO., 
AeentB, 643 Market Street Freight Office. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco, 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. su ' amer6leav6Broadwa y Wh * r * 

Sua Fraud bco. 

For Ketchikan. Juneau, TreadwellX Douglas City, 
Skaewnv, etc., Alaska, 11 a. m. : Jan. 1, 6. 11, 1G. 21. 26, 
31; Feb. 5. Change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. O. and Puget Sound PortB, 11 a. m. Jan. 
1,6, 11. 16.21.26,31; Feb. 5. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1 :S0 p. m. January 2. 
7. 12. 17.22,27; Feb. 1. 

For San Diego, Biopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 

Los Aneeles and Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sun- 
days. 9 a. m. ; steamer "State of California." Wednesdays; 9 a. m. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Hanta Cruz, Monterey. Man Simeon, Cayucos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Obispo) ^Gaviota. Santa Barbara. Ventura. 
Hueneine. Fast San Pedro, San Pedro, and •'Newport. (*Bonitaonly.) 

Steamer Bonlta, 8 a. m., Jan. 2, 10, 1H, 26; Feb- 3. Steamer Coos Bay. 9 
a. m , Jan, G, 14, 22, 30; Feb. 7. 

For Mexican Ports, 1U a.m., 7th of each month - 

For further Information obtain folders. 

Rights reserved to change steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— N , 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agte. 10 Market St., San Francisco 

Going East, take the 

UNION PACIFIC 



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United States OVERLAND MAIL 

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Daily Tourist c ervice. Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions from Q an 
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CHANGE. Through to Boston every Friday, 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, Gen. Agt. U. P. R. R., 
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Chicago |N les s than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



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(tfalif orm^Kbbtxt'x sex. 




Vol. LXIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 25, 1902. 



Number 4. 



The San Francisco Nkws LrrTKB Is printed and published every saturdaf 
by the proprietor FREDERICK MARRIOTT, ttf Kearny SI.. San Francisco 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

The office ol the 8. F. NEWS LETTER In London, Eng., Is at 30 Cornhlll 
8. C. London, England, (Oeorge Street & Co.. Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 

Chicago Representative— Arthur C. Quick. Room 500. Mosoi.lc Temple 
Chios go. 

New York Representative— C. Ironmonger. 116 Nassau Street. New York 

Boston Representative — W. H. Daggett. 36 Broomfleld Street. Boston. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended for 
publication In the current number of the NEWg LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 5 p.m. Thursday previous to day of Issue 

The escape of eleven prisoners from a Tacoma jail puts 
that city on the list as a brisk rival to Oakland. 



The Government has ruled that the Minnesota Indians 
shall wash off their war paint — another serious discourage- 
ment to local color. 



Things look rather serious when a German prince visiting 
America is obliged to call for a body guard to insure his 
safety aganist Anarchists. 



The Denver priest who denounced female suffrage before 
an audience of women gives us one of the most notable in- 
stances of modern courage. 



Queen Alexandra, in starting the fashion of high bodices, 
risks assassination at the fair hands of numberless ladies 
with generous pectoral endowments. 



The Rev. Mr. Bane must have had a talk with either Mr. 
J. Pierpont Morgan or Mr. Nicola Tesla before speaking on 
"The New Route to Heaven" last Sunday. 



The numerous tales of masked men and fair women com- 
ing over from Oakland tend to spread the impression that 
the Sleeping City is not so safe as she looks. 



Officers in Creede, Colorado, say that they have got Pat 
Crowe again. The News Letter is firmly convinced that the 
Crowe they have caught is only one of a large flock. 



New York is to have a hotel to cost three million dollars. 
Probably the price for a hall room, rear, will give heart 
disease to any one worth less than three millions. 



The large mortality of the Mojave Indians since the adop- 
tion of civilized customs makes it terribly apparent that 
civilization is as bad for the Indian in the south as in the 
north. 



When a young woman in Alabama shot two negroes be- 
cause they refused to play rag-time, she fully demonstrated 
the fact that the syncopated coon-song is not losing popular- 
ity in the South. 



Prisoners at Alcatraz have been floating away from the 
island on planks and boxes at the rate of about one a week. 
When will the authorities learn to keep lumber away from 
the convicts? 



The strong bids for affection extended to Uncle Sam from 
the crowned heads of Germany, Russia and Great Britain 
come as a strong hint that we are soon to be needed In 
some quarter of the globe. 



Those who read that the Government was "inspecting 
tracts," thought at first that Uncle Sam was making a re- 
Mini.' of the late Canteen unpleasantness. Events have proved 
that It Is a site for a military camp that is involved. 



The example of giving a ten-year sentence to the soldier 
who threatened the life of President Roosevelt could not 
have been improved upon, except, perhaps, ten or twelve 
years might have been added to the advantage of all con- 
cerned. 



Labor Mischief-Maker Ed. Rosenberg has returned from 
his pilgrimage into the North. He says that he found labor 
in a prosperous condition in the sections visited. If he left 
it as prosperous as he found it he showed an unwonted laxity 
in the performance of his duties. 



Not long ago King Edward was quoted as saying that he 
intended appearing in a frock coat with velvet sleeves. In 
a week all the London swells came out with plush trimmings 
— all but His Royal Majesty, who failed to make good. 
As a practical joker, Edward comes royally high. 



That Edward McCall of Oakland was suffocated from the 
effects of smoking a cigarette in bed, will be taken as a gilt- 
edged argument by the Anti-Tobacconists. Of course it was 
the smoke from the burning bed-clothes that killed McCall, 
but the Antis can argue that the cigarette started the 
trouble, at any rate. 



New York is to legislate against the many bogus oil 
schemes that come out of the West, to the financial discom- 
fiture of Eastern people. It would be better to try and beat 
some brains into the Easterners, so that they could realize 
that they couldn't make a fortune from a dollar and twenty 
cents' worth of oil stock. 



Crown Prince Frederick William of Germany has been 
confined to his room for two weeks as a penalty for breaking 
the rules of a student corps at Bonn. There are times when 
we are fain to enquire what is the use of being of royal 
blood if you can't do what you please without suffering the 
logical consequences? 



Professor Pearson of the Northwestern (Methodist) Uni- 
versity has published a statement to the effect that the 
Bible stories are untrue and that they are not very good 
stories, anyhow. Some state that this shows a new tendency 
in Methodism, but the wiser maintain that it Is only Pro- 
fessor Pearson's way of handing in his resignation. 



The old saying, "When the Devil was sick, the Devil 
a Saint would be," etc., is well illustrated in the case of 
Senator Charles A. Towne, Mr. William J. Bryan's running 
mate, who has become a millionaire through fortunate in- 
vestments, and now blossoms out as a Wall-street banker. 
William Jennings, what think you of that? 



Professor George H. Howison of the University of Califor- 
nia, has barred newspaper reporters out of his class-rooms 
in philosophy, declaring that they are "lost souls." Profes- 
sor Howison is evidently an exponent of the Philosophy of 
Truth, and believes that the average Ananias of the press 
is too far gone to be in any way benefited by his teachings. 
Perhaps the Professor has himself been "written up" and 
has had a chance to compare the various versions in various 
papers. 



SAN FRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 190S 



MAYOR SCHMITZ IN HASTE. 

San Francisco's fiddling Mayor is riding for a fall. He is 
going too fast, and is doomed to a broken political neck. 
It would better become a man of his limited education and 
knowledge of affairs to go slow and treat with at least some 
decent show of respect men the latchet of whose shoes 
he is unworthy to unloose. He is, without sufficient cause, 
wantonly and recklessly seizing upon the entire government 
of this municipality. The charter gives him one-third of it, 
and not the control of the whole. The wisdom of this limita- 
tion of powers is perfectly well understood by all who have 
followed the trend of local politics. The policy of the char- 
ter is that its various commissioners shall not go out of 
office at one and the same time. A continuity of government 
is thus maintained, that is proven by experience to be of the 
highest advantage to the public service. It is not good 
for the city or for the Mayor, that he should come into 
all his patronage immediately after his election, when he 
is bound hand and foot by pledges that ought never to have 
been given. He has one member of each of the commis- 
sions to appoint, but does not secure control of a majority 
until the beginning of the second year of office. By that 
time, it is presumed, he will have gotten rid of all his elec- 
tion promises, or they will be forgotten, and he will be a 
free man to faithfully serve the city with whatever ability 
he possesses. But Mayor Schmitz is finding a rude and 
rough way to ride into full power sooner than the law in- 
tended. There are men on the commissions of high and 
gentlemanly breeding who are naturally averse to being bul- 
lied by anybody, and who prefer to retire rather than submit 
to insult. That was the case the other day with Mr. Cas- 
♦ serly, a member of the Board of Education, who in the mid- 
dle of an insulting harrangue by the Mayor, cut it short by 
handing in his resignation. It is also the case with certain 
members of the Board of Health, men of the highest scien- 
tific attainments, who serve without pay, two of whom are 
to be forced out, so as to give Mayor Schmitz control of the 
large patronage in the gift of the Board. Dr. J. M. William- 
son is one of those who are to go. It will be remembered 
that some three years ago the Board found it difficult to get 
the City and County Hospital run without scandal, and that 
Dr. Williamson took up his residence in the hospital, aban- 
doned his large practice, served without compensation, and 
soon had things straightened out. It was a noble service 
that deserved to be held in remembrance. San Francisco has 
many skillful physicians, among whom Dr. Williamson holds 
a foremost place; it has many private gentlemen of high 
standing, of whom Dr. Williamson is not the least. That such 
a man should be kicked out of the public office he has graced 
and honored, and filled without remuneration, is a burning 
scandal and a shame, and the more so when perpetrated by 
one who is so far beneath him as a man and a gentleman. 
All this in the name of reform and Labor Unionism! 



RECALCITRANT SOLDIERS. 

A document which has caused more than usual comment 
was published in New York the other day. It is more than 
a year old. and is signed by nine American soldiers. While 
no one can overlook or sympathize with soldiers who desert 
their flag and counsel their comrades to go over to the 
enemy, it is unfortunately true that there is foundation in 
what they say as to the nature of the war of invasion now 
being carried on in the islands. They declare that "the Filip- 
pinos are fighting a manly and civilized warfare against 
Americans in the same manner in which our forefathers did 
against England in those glorious days of our grand and 
noble liberator, General George Washington." That this 
document has had jome effect, or that it voices the senti- 
ments of some of our soldiers, seems true from the fact 
that desertions are being frequently reported. One press 
despatch recently attributed the stubbornness of the Fili- 
pino defense in Samar to the presence of fifty American 
deserters; a statement we trust and believe to be an exag- 
geration. Nothing can justify so traitorous an act. It will, 
of course, go hard with them if they are captured. None 
the less, it is a fact that an increasing number of officers 
and men in the service dislike what seems to them the hope- 
less task of subjugating the Filipinos, and think themselves 
fortunate when they board a transport homeward bound. 



It is hardly necessary to say that the right way for them to 
record their protest is by leaving the service properly, and 
then make known their views to the public. It is, however, 
not the best way to encourage soldiers to remain loyal to 
their colors to deliver speeches in Congress calling upon 
them to do the very thing which the men at Samar are said 
to have done. An impassioned speech by one of the Missouri 
members was delivered in the House this week, and cheertd 
to the echo by Republicans and Democrats alike. It expressed 
among other things the hope that "the day was at hand 
when American soldiers would cease to fight against human 
liberty." Senator Hoar voiced much the same sentiment 
when he said: "If our republic, with its irresistible forces, 
had done with the Philippine people as we had done with 
Japan, its action would have found a response in what is 
best, and not in what is worst, in human nature. They would 
to-day be listening to our counsel, and informing themselves 
by our example. Their schools and universities would be 
filled with youth studying our language and history, fitting 
themselves to learn the great and noble story of the men 
who builded this republic. We should already have made 
of them a brave, honorable, and noble people, looking upon 
the present with satisfaction, and upon the future with hope. 
If, instead of that, they are exhibiting the traits which be- 
long to weakness and subjection, it is we who are largely 
responsible. If the Filipino be treacherous, it is we that 
have made him treacherous; if he be cruel, it is we that have 
made him cruel; if he be savage, it is we that have dashed 
the cup of liberty and civilization from his lips." No wonder 
our soldiers are deserting. It looks as if a motion in Congress 
to give the Filipinos their independence would carry. 



MUDDLING CHINESE EXCLUSION. 
California Congressmen are so excessively anxious to make 
popularity out of Chinese exclusion that they are muddling 
the whole business. Every one of them has a pet theory of 
his own, and is ready with an amendment to give it effect. 
They all want to identify their names with the act, either 
as its authors or as the fathers of important amendments 
which, as they fancy, "will send their names ringing down 
the ages." Everybody is jealous of everybody else. They 
started out to renew the Geary act, which everybody under- 
stands, which has been interpreted in all its parts by the 
Supreme Court, and has proven itself effective for the pur- 
poses for which it was designed. Nobody at the last election 
talked of anything more than "renewing the Geary act." 
It is a rather tough job to get an act through Congress 
against the Chinese that will hold water. On the com- 
mittees there is always some astute lawyer ready to insert 
a loop-hole for a fee, and then outside of Congress the whole 
bar stands ready to knock the bottom out of any exclusion 
act that is not double-riveted and wholly water-tight. The 
Chinese companies doing business in this country are liti- 
gious to the last degree, and never seem to be short of funds. 
That they will fight any new act that may be passed to 
the bitter end goes without saying. The principal bill which 
our Congressmen are now tinkering over is a long-drawn-out 
medley of illy-constructed experiments. Every man has had 
to have his finger in the pie, and the result is a concoction 
of neither "fish, flesh, fowl, nor good red herring." This 
bill is believed to be unconstitutional on its face; it certainly 
violates our treaties with China, and many of its clauses 
are susceptible of more than one construction. There are 
enough errors in it to enable it to be talked to death, and 
when it passes Congress, if it ever does, the present Supreme 
Court is quite in the humor to knock it into smithereens. 
Better, far better, avoid all these dangers by holding on to 
the Geary act. There is less disturbance of the settled rou- 
tine of business, and more certainty of action in that. At 
the same time, the State needs fruit pickers, gardeners, 
cooks, house-servants and the like, and cannot get them, 
unless the Chinese are admitted in limited numbers. Opin- 
ions on this subject have changed in recent years. The Chi- 
nese are no longer beaten and stoned as they used to be, 
but are protected and treated with respect. That sober- 
thinking people are now strongly in favor of admitting Chi- 
nese to occupy the various callings they now so admirably 
fill it without a doubt. The fury of the anti-Chinese cry has 
had its day, and the time is not far distant when Congress- 
men will find no popularity in pandering to It. 



ry 25. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE CANAL AND ITS HISTORY. 
The offer of tbc Panama Canal Company to soil Its prop- 
erty for forty millions of dollars, and the report to Con. 
of the United States Canal Commission recommending that 
the property be purchased at that figure, and the Panama 
route adopted, has served to bring to a climax a situation 
of chaotic confusion that should never have been anything 
but clear and simple. From start to finish this canal ques- 
tion presents a graphic illustration of the American skill 
In thimble-rigging with the great science of how not to do it. 
For the past twenty years the construction of a canal con- 
necting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans has been retarded 
and prevented by Americans who falsely pretended that they 
were, above all other things, anxious to have the great work 
undertaken and accomplished. About 1880 De Lesseps took 
up this canal project in earnest. After personally examin- 
ing the routes and causing preliminary surveys to be made, 
he adopted the Panama line as the most feasible. Then he 
sought to interest Americans in the project and to organ- 
lie an American company, under American control, to con- 
struct and operate it. His overtures were received with 
a cold shoulder. His scheme was a purely business one 
which did not contemplate any appeal for national alms. 
The men whom he sought to interest, however, perceived 
ta the canal project a magnificent jimmy with which to 
break into the United States Treasury, if they could only 
get a national feeling aroused on the subject. And so, when 
De Lesseps, flouted in New York, organized a company in 
Paris and proceeded to dig a canal (rather than do politics 
with a canal) a rival company was organized in New York 
which announced its intention of building a canal by way 
ol Nicaragua when Congress or some charitable person gave 
it the money to do so. Its organizers have never, however, 
contemplated risking their own money in the enterprise. 
The Nicaragua route was adopted by this company, not be- 
cause it was any better than the Panama route, but because 
De Lesseps, having taken the latter, it was the only one left. 
Meanwhile De Lesseps went on digging his canal. He 
secured ample capital, but, unfortunately, he also secured 
the assistance of a select assortment of unhung scoundrels 
as assistants. These fellows looted him of his good name 
and the company of its money. Failure naturally followed, 
and a half-finished ditch, together with much valuable 
machinery and material, has lain unused on this isthmus for 
years past. This is the property which it is proposed to 
buy for forty millions of dollars. It is supposed to be a very 
good bargain at more than double that amount, and repre- 
sents an investment of several hundred millions. The Nicar- 
agua canal, upon the other hand, has never gone beyond the 
stage of political engineering. Its paid-up capital has been 
a select assortment of American flags and an unlimited sup- 
ply of that brand of effusive patriotism which Samuel John- 
son has described as "the last refuge of a scoundrel." Like 
Colonel Sellers it has been vociferously enthusiastic for 
the old flag and an appropriation. Every bill which it has 
presented to Congress has embodied one of those quiet 
gouges that are usually designated steals. At first it coolly 
asked Congress to lend it the credit of the United States 
Treasury by endorsing its bonds, as a capital with which 
to build the waterway. In return, the United States Govern- 
ment was to receive nothing. It was to have no pecuniary 
interest in the canal, and no voice in its management. The 
News Letter was the first paper in the United States to ex- 
pose and denounce the unfairness of this proposition. Since 
then each succeeding bill has reduced the loot. First, the 
Government was given a representation on the Board of 
Directors in return for its financial support: subsequently, 
control of the Board was given. Next a large block of the 
stock was given, and later this was enlarged to a controlling 
interest. In short, each defeat of the Nicaragua canal bill 
was followed by a concession to common honesty, until, 
while the scheme always embodied (as does the Hepburn 
bill) rascally features, it was sufficiently innocuous to war- 
rant (in view of the break-down of the Panama scheme 
and the importance of canal communication) even the News 
Letter in supporting it. The News Letter, it may be pointed 
out, is a pioneer in the advocacy of a waterway between the 
oceans. In its New Year issue of 1882 it went to the aid of 
De Lesseps with an elaborate letter-press description of his 
project and a large lithographic picture, in colors, of the 



topography of tho canal route. Since then we ha% 
the doctrine of building a canal, In season and out of sea- 
son. When the Panama scheme was on its feet we supported 
It; when it died, and the Nicaragua people reduced their de- 
mands to reasonable bounds, we sought to assist them. In 
all this we have endeavored to aid the clientele we serve — 
the material interests of the people of the Pacific Coast. 
These material Interests want a canal, and they want It as 
soon as It can be obtained. Therefore they favor the con- 
summation of the project to purchase the Panama franchise 
and plant. Routes arc nothing as long as we get a compe- 
tent waterway. 



THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce has just ended 
a most successful year, elected its new officers, held its 
annual meeting, and increased its reputation in a marked 
degree. Mr. George Newhall was re-elected President, and 
submitted a number of reports dealing with the many sub- 
jects the Chamber has handled during the past year. Some 
of the work undertaken consists in having one of the new 
cruisers now in course of construction, named "The Cali- 
fornia;" the China Basin lease has been accomplished ; 
lightship appropriations amounting to an additional $90,000 
have been secured, and a relief ship is now in process 
of being built; successful protest was made against remov- 
ing the Philippine transport service from the port; the tariff 
on flour exported to Manila has been reduced from 75 cents 
to 40 cents per hundred kilos; national irrigation has been 
pushed with such success that President Roosevelt has made 
it one of his recommendations to Congress; a Federal fruit 
quarantine law gives promise of passing, and the matter of 
repairing vessels of our Asiatic squadron at this port is 
pending. A wireless telegraph service to the Farralones is 
about to be established. The past year has been a prosper- 
ous one, our banks gained $20,000,000 in resources during 
that period. Deposits in the city's savings banks increased 
$9,000,000. October seems to have been the most prosper- 
ous month, notwithstanding the labor strikes. The export 
business for that month amounted to $6,000,000. The wheat 
crop of the State amounted to over 30,000,000 bushels, and 
barley exceeded 20,000,000 bushels; most of which was 
exported in two hundred and one grain ships. For many 
years Great Britain has been our best customer for wheat, 
and still continues, as she took about 12,000,000 bushels dur- 
ing the year. Our fruit crops make an exceptionally large 
showing. Petroleum exceeded 9,000,000 barrels, and beet 
sugar footed up 80,000 tons. It is a great work the Chamber 
of Commerce is doing, and in Mr. Newhall it has just the 
kind of President to see that it is done. The Chamber has 
prospered exceedingly under his Presidency, and it is for- 
tunate in being able to retain his gratuitous services yet 
another year. Good work is being done at Washington by 
the Chamber's agent, the ever active and alert Mr. William 
M. Bunker, and its Secretary, Mr. B. Scott, is up to his eyes 
in business all the time. 



THE KLUGE-SUTRO CASE SETTLED. 

So many times have promises been made of the final set- 
tlement of the contest by Mrs. Kluge-Sutro for a share of the 
Sutro fortune that it was thought the case would never 
end. But it has terminated at last, the heirs having wisely 
concluded to compromise with the plaintiff. Under the terms 
of the settlement Mrs. Kluge-Sutro receives $80,000 and her 
two children get $10,000 each— $100,000 in all. 

This case is familiar to most of the readers of the News 
Letter. Mrs. Kluge-Sutro was the wife of ex-Mayor Sutro, 
and as such made a claim for her share of his estate. The 
children of Sutro contested this claim, holding that she had 
never married their father. Mrs. Kluge-Sutro was willing 
all the time to compromise the case rather than to endure 
the publicity of a trial, and through her attorney, Mr. Van 
R. Paterson, used every means toward that end. The other 
heirs were obdurate, but at last have seen the wisdom of her 
plan, and have given in. , 

Mrs. Kluge-Sutro has not received all that is hers by right, 
but her claim of marriage to Sutro has been established, and 
the future happiness of herself and her children assured. 
She and her attorney, Mr. Paterson, are to be congratulated 
in having secured justice. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 



A STREET-CAR AUXILIARY. 

San Francisco has one of the finest fire departments in the 
world, both in the matter of equipment and of the character 
of the men who fight the flames. Our old-time preponderance 
of wooden buildings had a good deal to do with this, their 
inflammable nature making good fire-fighting apparatus nec- 
essary, and we have progressed until we are able to fight 
almost any fire that comes along, the abundance of stone and 
brick buildings which now form our city making it still 
easier. The principal thing we now have to contend with is 
the hilly nature of the peninsula upon which San Francisco 
is located. The wholesale district, luckily, is in the flat, 
level part of town; but some of our principal residence 
streets are on high hills, up which it is almost impossible to 
drag an engine. The News Letter has always contended that 
the street-car system of the town should be pressed into 
service as an auxiliary fire department, and although there 
has been a movement in that direction, it has been allowed 
to fall through. 

In a recent number of the Municipal Journal and En- 
gineer is a very interesting article bearing upon a similar 
subject. It describes Springfield, Massachusetts, as one of 
the ideal cities of the United States, and d»votes consider- 
able space to the manner in which fire engines are conveyed 
to suburban districts over the electric car lines. Motor 
trucks have been constructed onto which fire engines can be 
easily loaded, and at a great saving of time and expense 
the engine is taken to the scene of the fire. There is 
no reason in the world why our cable lines could not be 
used in the same way at even less expense, as the need of 
trucks would be obviated. 

Cable lines pass over nearly all of our hills, which are 
so steep that a fire engine can hardly be drawn up by horses. 
In some instances the hills are so steep as to make It 
impossible, and the engines, hook-and-ladder trucks, etc., 
have to proceed to the scene of the fire in a round-about 
way, often arriving too late to be ol any service. 

Let us take California street, from Montgomery to Mason 
or Powell street, from Sutter to California, as instances. 
Over both of these lines cars run at intervals of less than 
five minutes. There is nothing, except the unwillingness of 
the street-car companies, to prevent fire engines being 
coupled to the rear ends of street cars and taken quickly 
where needed. Independent trucks to run over the electric 
lines would be a pleasant and welcome addition to the 
department, but arrangements with the cable lines are far 
more necessary. Our costliest residences are in the most 
inaccessible places, and any scheme that would make them 
easy of approach should be adopted. 



HOW SHALL WE TRADE WITH CUBA AND THE 

PHILIPPINES? 

Pretty nearly everything that is just now being either 
written or spoken about Cuba or the Philippines, needs to be 
taken with a grain of salt. Congress is up to its eyes in 
muddle in regard to these two matters. It is declaring 
that if it leaves Cuba to itself it will starve. We must give 
it a free market or it will die. Why? What has happened 
to change its destiny since it was wrested from Spain? 
We carried on a very successful trade with Cuba before, 
when the island was under its heaviest load of Spanish tyr- 
anny. Our trade with Cuba then benefited us materially, 
and helped to make a closer connection apparently neces- 
sary to us. Is it possible that we rescued the prosperous 
and high-trading Queen of the Antilles from the oppression 
of the old and benighted Spain for no better purpose than 
to constitute her a degenerate and a pauper upon our bounty? 
Has Cuba libre Ken handicapped in any way? If she has, 
then, indeed, hath our "benevolent" policy worked a strange 
result. And California, more than any other State in the 
Union, is to be made to pay for what are called our benevo- 
lent intentions towards Cuba. Reciprocity to Cuba means 
death to our great fruit and beet sugar industries, and is not 
thought of on the Pacific Coast without horror. If this 
blow falls upon us, very little will remain that we need 
care to have protected, and we may as well go in for free 
trade all round. Freightage on fruit from here to the East 
costs five or six times as much as it does from Cuba to New 
York. The very life of the business hangs upon the tariff 



which it Is now proposed to surrender. Isn't that paying 
too dear for our whistle? 

Then comes the Philippines. What are we to do about 
those far-away, dearly bought, and not yet conquered little 
specks on the ocean? Congress clearly does not know. It 
began its present session cock-sure that we must establish 
free trade with them forthwith, maintaining, at the same 
time, their tariff against all the rest of the world. But 
that would not do, as President Roosevelt was prompt to 
point out. It would antagonize "the open door policy," 
which we, in company with England, forced upon the East. 
Now Congress is away on another tack. It Is proposing a 
rebate of 50 per cent on the duties levied on Philippine goods 
imported into this country. What good would that do any- 
body? It would lessen the revenues of the islands, but as 
we now make good the deficiencies, and are likely to have 
to do so for a long time to come, we should only be robbing 
Peter to pay Paul. It really does seem as if Congress does 
not possess the genius necessary to the Government of over- 
the-sea possessions. And for this there is cause. Members 
have grown up under a constitution that from its very 
initiation was directed against every phase of colonial Gov- 
ernment. It was intended to prevent the governing of other 
people against their will, and it is by no means clear yet 
that it has failed of its purpose. 



AMERICAN BANKING FACILITIES WANTED IN CHINA. 

To do commerce successfully, something further and other 
than "stepping off stones". — whatever they may be taken to 
mean — are necessary. We have got Manila, but we do not 
hear of trans-shipments from that point to Hongkong, Yoko- 
hama or Vladivostock. San Francisco is our stepping-off 
stone to the trade of the Orient, and is not likely to be beaten 
in that regard by Manila. There is more danger from our 
ports on Puget Sound. For the present, however, we are 
suffering more keenly from the competition with England 
and Germany. Our share of the trade of the East Is a mere 
bagatelle compared with theirs. How are we going to better 
it? In the first place, we have not yet supplied ourselves 
with the first essential to trade: that is, banking facilities. 
We talk of our great concentrations of capital in New York, 
Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston, but capital concentrated 
is not taking its due share in manipulating the commerce of 
the world. There is not a feeder anywhere to the trade of 
England that does not contain British banks and British capi- 
tal in abundance. An American traveling in the Orient must, 
if he wants money, place his draft in some bank not of his 
own country. But it looks as if there may be coming a 
change to all this. The selection of a New York trust com- 
pany to establish the necessary agency in the East for re- 
ceiving, on the part of the Government, the share of the 
Chinese indemnity coming to the United States, will doubt- 
less prove the entering wedge destined to open up bank- 
ing facilities for our merchants in that part of the world. 
Our Government has hitherto depended upon foreign agen- 
cies for transmitting and disbursing funds and for effecting 
exchange. It has proved costly, and sometimes troublesome, 
illustrating the disadvantage of such dependence upon for- 
eign commercial and financial facilities in efforts to promote 
our own national interests. We shall encounter difficulty 
in establishing a financial foothold wherever we do business, 
and short of that we should not cease our efforts. The money 
drift follows many routes. It does not get distributed around 
in a day nor in a year, and perhaps not in a century. In India 
old gold coins are frequently coming to light that are several 
centuries old. The same thing is measurably true In the 
British Isles and other old countries. Ours is a young coun- 
try and an active one. It possesses a wonderful lot of money, 
considering its age. It also owes not a little coin, but our 
borrowing need cause no alarm, and ought not to be paid 
off yet awhile. We can make better use of our borrowed 
money than in paying it back again just now. It draws a 
low rate of interest, whilst earning a high one. Besides, as 
we have seen, we are at the threshold of a mighty commerce, 
whose development will require all the money we can lay 
our hands on. It will take not a little to establish a bank, 
or banks, in every commercial center of the world. 



• Merchants. Miners, Mechanics and Farmers all d-lnk Jesse 

Moore Whiskey In preference to any other brand. 



January 25, 1902. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A SLOPPY TILT. 



Romance of Any Old Century Before Brains Came Into 
General Uie, With a Prologue That Has Nothina to Do 
With the Story, and an Epilogue That is So Headed 
Because the Word Sounds Well: The Whole Being an 
Effort to Demonstrate That Foolish Imaginations Do Not 
Dwell Altogether With Writers of Romantic Novels. 



Prologue. 
The King lay dying, and the Master of the Bedchamber, 
the Polisher of the Kingly Spectacles, the Lighter of the 
Imperial Pipe and the Carrier of the Towel, all sobbed at the 
bedside. He had been a bad king, but he had given them 
steady work; they had no pull with the Prince, and they 
knew that when the King died they would have to scramble 
hard for rent money. So they sobbed. But the King, who 
was always used to having his own way, died anyway; 
and the Prince became King. Vive l'Unum, E Pluribus Roi. 

Chapter I. 

Sir Tilty Lancebuster, the valiant knight, rode forth in the 
gloaming. His visor was up and he was smoking cigarettes 
furiously, lighting each one by striking his mailed hands 
together and catching the sparks. 

"By my halidome, or my halo, or whatever it is (I never 
could remember those Latin names) if I meet that scullion- 
natureJ, liver-hearted Sir Sloppy Pastyface, I'll bust him 
wide open," he muttered. "He thinks to cop the Lady Gene- 
vieve — he, who never lifted a Holy Grail, and who goes under 
the table at the fifth gallon of sack. Gadzooks and bodkins, 
hoop-poles and whiffle-trees — ere I allow that caitiff knave 
to taste the lips of the fair Lady Genevieve, I'll soak my 
visored head in yonder turbid stream. Now, where the devil 
ii that stream? How am I to oe a doughty knight in a 
romantic novel without a turbid stream? But never mind! 
An I meet that snivelling Sir Pastyface I'll make him a belted 
knight in fact! I'll belt him all over this fair landscape and 
ieed his carcass to the swine! I'll sell his armor to a boiler 
foundry, and with the gold I'll buy a raglan for the fair 
Lady Genevieve. Aha! Mayhap 'tis he who's coming now!" 

Chapter II. 

Sir Sloppy Pastyface, Knight of the Poker Table, sallied 
forth upon his ambling steed. Dusk was descending, and so 
were his spirits. He realized that the Lady Genevieve would 
never be his unless he did up the terrific Sir Lancebuster. 

" 'Tis tough, 'tis passing tough," he muttered beneath his 
flaxen beard. "What chance stand I against that big Sir 
Lancebuster? Yet if I whip him not this fair lady will 
look upon me with scorn. And what has he ever done ex- 
cept pursue the strenuous life? Can he play upon the 
harp? Nay! Can he improvise ragtime? Nay! Why, but 
yesternight he tried to sing beneath her window and scared 
a nightingale to death. Yet because he can crack a few heads 
Lady Genevieve looks with favor upon him. If I meet him 
I'm up against it good and hard. My God, he comes!" 

Chapter III. 

Up in her room in the tower the fair Lady Genevieve was 
sobbing her tears away. The parrot shrieked in sympathy, 
and the bulldog looked up with moist eyes into the face of 
his mistress. 

"Alas," she sobbed, "was ever maiden so forlorn! Who 
could be happy with a mangy old parrot instead of a falcon? 
Who ever heard of a girl in a romantic novel without a 
falcon? And why have they given me a bulldog instead of 
a deer-hound? Lady Genevieves always have deer-hounds, 
and here I am with a brute of a bull-dog ugly enough to carry 
off all the ribbons in a bench show! Woe is me! No em- 
broidery to work on and not a tapestry in the room. How I 
am beset! And poor Sir Pastyface has gone forth to scrap 
with Lancebuster. Why did I send him away to joust? He 
will be done up in one-two-three order, and I will have to 
marry Sir Tilty — and I know he will beat me! But if they 
bring back Sir Sloppy a corpse I'll throw myself into the 
moat. My God, there is no moat! I am undone!" 
Chapter IV. 

"Avast and have at you!" 

It was Sir Tilty Lancebuster who spoke, and his voice went 



thundering adown the forest aisles. 

oald Sir Sloppy. In his pollt»at manner, 
"but. oy all tha I .nil. I have said, Avaunt and have 

at y 

What I say cuta no Ire," anl.l Sir Tilty. "You know darned 
««ll what I mean, and 111 give you Just two shakes of my 
lance to create a vacancy In the path. In less than a minute 
you'll be known as the remains.' Belay, ilwr.' ." (Sir Tilty 
had been I sailor before he took to knli;liti: 

I would like to say that It was a glorious fight — but it 
wasn't. Sir Tilty made one lunge at Sir Sloppy, and for a 
minute It was all over but the running. Sir Sloppy tamed 
his steed's head and went tearing down the forest path. 
Sir Tilty was close behind, yelling, "Avast," "Belay," "Lay 
to," "Bear a hand." at the top of his lungs. It looked like 
a victory for him, when suddenly his charger stumbled, 
throwing the good knight over his head. His neck was busted 
i i twain — and so he died. Sir Sloppy picked up Sir Tilty's 
lance, and with it betook him to the castle, where he laid it 
at the feet of the fair Lady Genevieve. 

Epilogue. 

It is ten years after. Out on the steps of the castle Lady 
Genevieve Pastyface sits, with a deer-hound at her feet and 
a falcon on her wrist. A handsome boy, her son, Sloppy 
Junior, sits beside her, and Sir Sloppy, a little aged since 
we saw him last, but as pasty-faced as ever, is rubbing up 
his armor with benzine, and telling his offspring for the hun- 
dredth time how he slew Sir Tilty in the gloomy gloam of the 
forest. It is well. 

W. J. W. 



Your troubles vanish when you drink Old Crow Whis- 
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that go to make a first-class liquor. 



Omey & Goetting, stalls 33-34-45-46 California Market, 

have none but the freshest fruits and vegetables. Their stock 
includes everything on the market. 



When in doubt go to Techau Tavern. A line orchestra 

plays there every evening, and the food and wines are of 
the kind that will cause you to return. 



A. de LIZE & FILS 



BORDEAUX 




Fine Clarets 
and Sauternes 



In Cases, Quarts, and Pints 



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814 Sacramento St., San Franclaco, 



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MATTHEWS DENTAL CO. 

SPECIALTY: CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 
128 Powell Street. 

Phone Bed 2714 San Franoiioo 



HMD'S 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 
Illustrated Catalogue Free. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




Vkasurelr 
Wand 

GJeciey no wand but Pleasure's .' 
-* — Tom Star*. ^K63m 




There's a genuine comic opera at the Columbia — "Princess 
Chic." It is not a knock-about comedy with orchestral ac- 
companiment, as are nine-tenths of the attractions that now 
travel under the name of comic opera, but it is the real 
thing — reminiscent, to be sure, of everything from the 
"Mikado" to the "Nieblung Ring," but a great relief, never- 
theless, after the travesties with which we have tried to be 
content. 

Mr. Kirk La Shelle wrote the book and Mr. Julian Edwards 
the music, and they have succeeded in putting together a 
melodious, tuneful opera, with considerable comedy in it, 
and with several beautiful songs. There is a plot, too, 
that has a definite connection with the opera. 

Princess Chic has the merriest bunch of comedians that 
have frisked before a San Francisco audience for many a 
day. Their lines and business do not come up to their 
capabilities — probably a miscalculation on the part of the 
authors, who may have had the Matthews & Bulger type 
in mind. Mr. Edward Metcalfe, who plays the first soldier of 
fortune, does work of a very high order. He is possessed of 
a good, resonant bass voice, a plastic face, and a pair o> 
nimble legs. He has size, too — stands six feet or more, 
carries himself like a king, and plays with an apparent joy 
in being a comedian. His companion, Mr. W. A. Lawrence, 
the second soldier of fortune, is not far behind him in capa- 
bilities or size, and is an excellent dancer. Their "Soldiers 
of Fortune" song is almost classical in its rhythm. Mr. Neil 
McNeil, steward to the Princess, has a quaint and cheery 
face, a pleasing voice, and a full conception of his part. 

Mr. Thomas C. Leary, the fourth of this quartette, is no 
stranger to San Francisco. He was with us for years, but 
we called him "Tommy." He came back to us the same old 
Tommy, and on Monday night received a regular prima 
donna reception — flowers and all. He had to make a 
speech as soon as he appeared before the footlights, and an- 
other when two or three wagonloads of flora! offerings were 
passed up at the end of the first act. He'd probably have 
been talking yet if his ideas had held out. But his recep- 
tion wasn't altogether on account of bygone days. He has a 
good part in the Princess Chic, and plays it excellently. 
Remembering his Terpsichorean feats in "The Geisha," one 
would wish to see more chance in the opera for the exer- 
cise of his abilities in that line. 

The audience thought the four wags would never get to- 
gether in a song; but they did in the last act. Their "riddle" 
song was well worth waiting for. 

Maude Lillian Berri was Princess Chic of Normandy. She 
is a San Franciscan, too, and her turn came at the end of the 
second act, when she was laden with flowers and called upon 
for a speech, which she tried to make. She succeeded in 
telling the audience that it had been very good to her, which 
was very true — and she deserved it. 

Miss Berri, it seems, has been playing Princess Chic only 
a short time, but her work doesn't betray the fact. She 
is perfectly at home in the part. She has much ability, and 
a voice above the average comic opera queen's. She has 
a fine figure, too, and as she wears the costumes of both 
sexes in the opera it was shown to full advantage. Her 
love songs made a hit, and her ditty about the maid "in the 
heart of the old oak tree," (really, almost an impossible situa- 
tion) is a sweet and fetching ballad, admirably sung. 

Edna Floyd as Estelle, daughter to Chambertin (Mr. 
Leary) was a close second to Miss Berri. She has a sweet, 
light voice, well used in good songs. Dorothy Hunting plays 
Lorraine, page to the Princess, and sings in a pleasing con- 
tralto voice. 

Mr. Hubert Wilke makes a fine appearance as the Duke of 
Burgundy, and acts the part well — but his merit ends there. 
His voice is fiat and flabby. 

They have a good chorus in Princess Chic, as far as sing- 
ing goes. Their movements are not altogether up to the stan- 
dard. A great opportunity for a rousing men's chorus is lost 



in the last act, when Mr. Metcalfe sings "War is a Bountiful 
Jade." The song is majestic in its beauty, and none of it 
is lost in Mr. Metcalfe's delivery; but the composition of 
the chorus is weak and puny in comparison. 

• * * 

In a rather uncalled-for speech at the Grand Opera House 
on the afternoon of January 17th, Mayor Schmitz, in an- 
nouncing a new series of symphony concerts under Leader 
Paul Steindorff, remarked that the latter is giving us as good 
musical entertainment as can be heard not only in the 
United States but in the world. Such exaggerated praise 
is cheap and tawdry, and jarred upon the feelings of most of 
the audience. Mr. Steindorff and his band of musicians 
are giving us some exceedingly good symphony concerts, 
well worth hearing and encouraging, but when he comes 
up to Mayor Schmitz' fulsome praise we may expect to lose 
him. New York and Europe will be beckoning. 

The third of the concerts — the last one of the first series 
— was given at the Grand Opera House before a large and 
fashionable audience — also a very appreciative audience. 
It is easy to note steady improvement in the players. 

The opening number, the Mozart Symphony No. 6 
(Jupiter) would tax the capacities of any band of musicians, 
and it is to the credit of Mr. Steindorff that the men under 
his hand gave it with so few flaws. There was lack of pre- 
cision once in a while, and some of the delicate shading 
was lost. The best work was done in the first and last 
movements of the symphony. 

The new overture, Reznicek's "Donna Diana," caught the 
fancy of all, and Wagner's "Dreams" held the audience spell- 
bound. It is a beautiful composition, full of delicate grada- 
tions, and none of it was lost in the rendering. The pro- 
gramme closed with Massenet's "Scenes Pittoresque," which 
was given with spirit and accuracy. 

• • • 
Miss Anna Lichter's inability to appear until next week on 

account of illness, has caused a revival of the "Toymaker'' 
at the Tivoli. This is a favorite opera among Tivoli patrons, 
and it is put on with the same cast as several months ago. 
Mr. Hartman's German dialect is not quite like anything 
else ever heard — it is a sort of idiom peculiar to himself; 
still, it is very amusing. His topical songs are well received. 

Miss Annie Myers is the star of the performance. She 
simulates a cleverly contrived doll which speaks, dances, 
talks, etc. Her stiff, mechanical movements and disjointed 
speech are mirth-provoking, making her natural movements 
and songs more charming. Miss Myers possesses a good 
comic opera voice and more than usual ability as an actress, 
measured by the opera standard. 

Mr. Arthur Cunningham, as Brother Mathew, has a great 
chance in the Toymaker to show off his excellent baritone 
voice. It is a most pleasing quality and of good range. His 
leadership makes the two monastery scenes very attractive. 

The rest of the cast did well. Mr. Joseph Fogarty is Count 
Ballenberg. If Mr. Fogarty's name did not betray his an- 
cestry his voice would; it has a fine Hibernian accent and 
a rich quality. Mr. Henry Cashman as his companion, 
Schwartzenbach, does well in the always unpleasing role of 
a senile rake. Mr. Edward Webb, who as a rule plays com- 
edy parts, has a very serious role as Frederick, and plays it 
with a becoming gravity of demeanor. His singing is above 
the average. 

• • • 

It's rather an athletic bill at the Orpheum this week. The 
Da Coma family are acrobats of a high order, both men and 
women doing their turn in evening dress, and performing 
some of the most difficult and startling feats ever seen at 
the Orpheum. 

The Taylor sisters are skaters, and are a revelation in that 
line. They are graceful in all their movements, and do things 
that call for a high degree of skill and nerve. Trick and 
fancy skaters do not come here often, and the Taylor sisters 
are about as good as can be seen. 

Miss Ada Aronaldson is a Swedish singer who has a good 
contralto voice, which she uses to much advantage in several 
songs. She has established herself as a favorite with the 
'Orpheum audiences. 

The biograph, always popular, is showing some very at- 
tractive pictures this week, the "Living Flag" being espec- 
ially good. W. J. W. 



January 25. 1902. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



plte the heavy rain. Sherman. Clay * Co.'s Hall n 
r alre«t waa Oiled Saturday ntternoon last with 
>plo and music lovers, all exceedingly anx- 
ious to hear tho Angelus Piano Player, one of the most ninr- 
muslrnl Inventions ot the age. The Stelnway piano 
waa used, and with the Angelus attachment the most cap- 
tious musical critic could find no fault with the rendition 
of the many difficult pieces of music. 

Tho Angelus Is most simple. A roll of perforated music 
Is put In. the player regulates the movement, and .vlth or 
without musical ability on the part of the person In f 
It. the piano, with the aid of the Angelus. pours out meli 
the performer wills. The performer is seemingly ah 
inject as much of his musical temperament into the selec- 
tions as he chooses. 

The programme given Saturday embraced selections of all 
kinds, opening with Suppe's Overture, Paragraph 3. Through- 
out this, violin, flute and other orchestral effects could be 
plainly discerned. The second number, which included 
Dolmetch's "Second Valse Lente," Loraine's "Zamonia." and 
"A Coon Band Contest," by Pryor, afforded variety enough 
to suit everyone. Greig's "Norwegian Dance" brought forth 
much applause, as did the potpourri from "The Ameer." 

The programme had 3elections from Liszt, Moniuszko and 
others. One of the features most prominent was the con- 
trol which the player has over this instrument in subduing 
the accompaniment and the accenting of a sustained melody. 
In the seventh selection the subduing of the overbalancing 
1-2-3 base in the waltz movement and the accentuation of 
the time, rhythm and melody, was especially marked. 

The programme included two songs by Mr. Frank, the 
baritone, and a few songs and instrumental selections from 
the Victor Disc talking machine, which added much to the 
entertainment. 

* • • 

"The Ameer" will be given at the Tivoli next week. Mr. 
Ferris Hartman will be the Ameer; Mr. Edward Webb, the 
Fool; Mr. Harry Cashman, the Chamberlain; Miss Anna 
Lichter, Constance; Miss Annie Myers, Fanny; Mr. Arthur 
Cunningham, Chief of the Brigands. Miss Frances Graham 
will sing the contralto part, and Mr. Harold Gordon, the new 
tenor, will make his appearance. 

* • • 

The production of "The Danites" at the Alcazar has been 
postponed until February 3d. Next week "Coralie & Com- 
pany, Dressmakers," will be produced. It is a French farce, 
one of the authors having written "Pink Dominoes." Some 
new mechanical stage effects will be seen. 

* * * 

The "Cycle Whirl" will make its first appearance in this 
city next week at the Orpheum. In this act two wheelmen 
ride and perform tricks on a circular track, five feet high and 
built at an angle of seventy degrees. Miss Josephine Sabel 
will re-appear in songs and imitations. Jordan & Crouch are 
novelty dancers. Kelly & Violette are singers. The three 
Nambas are Japanese equilibrists and jugglers. The hold- 
overs are the Taylor sisters, Ada Arnoldson, the Da Comas 
and the biograph. 

* * « 

"The Princess Chic" will continue at the Columbia all 
next week. Following it will come Viola Allen in her new 
play, "In the Palace of the King," dramatized by Mr. Lorimer 
Stoddard from Mr. F. Marion Crawford's romantic novel. 
The advance sale of seats begins Thursday. 

* * * 

Mr. Josef Hoffman, the pianist, will appear at the Colum- 
bia Theatre on Tuesday and Friday afternoons of next week. 
The two programmes include selections from Haydn, Beetho- 
ven, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Moszkowski, Wag- 
ner, Weber, Mendelssohn, and some of his own compositions. 

• • • 

The subscription second series of symphony concerts at 
the Grand Opera House will be given on the Friday after- 
noons of January 31st and February 14th and 28th. Director 
Paul Steindorff and his orchestra will give the follow- 
ing at the next performance, which takes place next Friday. 
1. Symphony, New World, Dvorak; 2. Overture, Euryanthe, 
Weber; 3. Suite, the Nutcracker, Tschalkowsky; 4. Rhapso- 
edi Espagnol, Lalo. The sale of seats will begin at Sherman, 
Clay & Co.'s next Tuesday morning at nine o'clock, the prices 
being |1.50, $1.00, 76 cents and 50 cents. The concert will 



begin at 3:1R sharp. tb« usual time. 

I Monday evenlriK ■ testimonial benefit will 
Madame Fal.brl Mueller on the seventieth anniversary »l her 

birth-day, Madame Pabbrl-Mueller baa done much fa 

advancement of music In this rlty, and It Is boned that the 
DODjal will be well patronize,!. An attractive pro- 
gramme has been arranged. 

• • • 

At Byron laauy'i Hall, last evening, an entertaining 
piano recital was given by the pupils of Miss Clnra Nolan. 
assisted by Mr. Kantista Horonda. The prog r a mme was a 
varied one. most creditably presented. 



Did you say Rye? Then try Jesse Moore Rye 

In the world. 



-the ttnest 



Columbia Theatre. uo " M "' l»m« »n!I M»n««ir«. 

To-niaht, Sunday iML-tit, and (or a Second nnd Last Week, conim en 
cine Next Monday. 

KIRK La SHELLE OPERA COMPANY 

in the Merry Musical Success, 

THE PRINCESS CHIC 

A magnificent Production, 

Feb. 3 — Viola Allen, presenting " In the Palace of the King." 



SPECIAL ANNOUCEMENT. 
Two Pinno Recitals 
Next Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, January 23 and 31, at 
3 o'clock. 

JOSEF 

HOFMANN 

The Great Pianist. His First Appearance Here. 
Reserved seats, $2, 81.50, 11.00, and 50c. Now on sale at Sherman- 
Clay Co.'s Store. 

Grand Opera House. — SPECIAL 

Friday Afternoon, Jan. 31, at 3:15 sharp. 

FIRST SYMPHONY CONCERT (Second Series) 
under the auspices of the SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

Paul Steindobff, Director. 
Superb Orohestro. Giulio Minetti, Concertmelster. 

Reserved Seats— 81.50, 81.00. 75o and 50o. On sale at Sherman. Clay 
& Co.'s next Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock. Subscription sale eloees 
this afternoon at 5 o'clock. Prices for Three Concert*, 8.3.50, f2,25, 
Jl .75 and 81.25. 

T! * _ I ! f*\ I— I _ MB8. Ernestine Kbelinq, 

I VOl I Upera flOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp! 
To-night and to-morrow night. Last of 

THE TOY MAKER 

Monday, Jan. 27— First time at this house of Prank Daniel's Great 
Hit, 

THE AMEER 

Popular prices— 25, 50, and 76 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



OE San Francisco's Greatest Music 

TO rieU IT\ . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, January 26. 



Hall. 

and Powell streets. 



THE GREAT GYGLE WHIRL; Sabel; Jordan and Crouch; 
Kelly and Violette; Three Nambas; Taylor Twin Sisters; Ada Ar- 
noldson; the Biograph and the DA COMA FAMILY. 

Reserved seats, 25o; Balcony 10c; opera chairs aud box seats. 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Bblasoo & Thall, Managers. 

Phone Main 254 



Week commencing Jan. 27th. The greatest and most modern of 
French farces, 

CORALIE Z> CO., DRESSMAKERS 

Startling Mechanical Effeo's. Fun galore. Everybody and Every- 
thing in it Is Funny. 

Regular Matinees Saturday and Funday. Prices, 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c 
and 75c. Seats on sale six days in advance. 
Next— The Danites. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKRND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the tines! 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theatre 
Is over 






10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




Library&able 



!?^^"" 



£ 




The name of Mr. Jacob A. Riis is 

The Making of an well known to all readers of the 
American. daily press, for, while President 

Roosevelt was a Police Commissioner 
of New York City, Mr. Riis was a police reporter on the New 
York Sun, and to him is due not a little ot "the revolutioniz- 
ing spirit which induced a few brave men to take up arms 
against a sea of troubles" in the shape of saloons, over- 
crowded tenements, and the degrading life of the dives in 
the great metropolis. Mr. Riis has given much thought to 
the proper housing of New York's poor, and his three books, 
■How the Other Half Lives," "Out of Mulberry Street," and 
"The Children of the Poor," show how keen is his interest 
in the working classes. In "The Making of an American," 
Mr. Riis gives to the world a story of his own life, but in 
a manner so simple, so honest, so free from personal vanity, 
ttat it makes the autobiography very readable as well as 
stimulating, and redounds immensely to the credit of the 
writer as well. He left Denmark when a mere lad. He had 
been refused by the youthful daughter of the village mag- 
nate, and carried away with him to the new world her pic- 
ture and a lock of her hair. In America he began life as a 
day laborer. A stranger in a strange land he ran the 
whole gamut of the immigrant's experiences, encountered 
obstacle after obstacle, and at last found himself one of the 
great army of tramps, "wandering," he says, "about the 
streets in the daytime, with the one aim of somehow stilling 
the hunger that knawed at my vitals, and fighting at night 
with the vagrant curs and outcasts as miserable as myself 
for the protection of some sheltering ash-Din or doorway." 
* * * "It was under such auspices that I made the acquain- 
tance of Mulberry Bend, the Five Points, and the rest of the 
slum, with which there was in the years to come to be a 
reckoning. For half a lifetime afterward they were my 
haunts by day and by night, as a police reporter, and I 
can fairly lay claim, it seems to me, to a personal knowledge 
ol the evil I attack." After a manful struggle against in- 
justice, ignorance, indifference, and his own limitations — 
a struggle that would have proved utterly disheartening to 
a man made of stuff less stem — he gained a foothold in his 
adopted country — gained too the love of the girl whose image 
lias filled his heart for six years, and together they began 
life's journey in earnest. He fought his way to an honor- 
able citizenship, and applied his acquired knowledge to the 
betterment of the condition of the city poor. It is good 
to read the record of such a life, nor can one close the book 
without a certain mental uplift. The personal element in it 
brings the facts home in a way that no merely objective 
writing can. As a love story it leaves nothing to be desired, 
and as a study of the conditions, in America it is of excep- 
tional value, for it is in a certain sense a manual of civic 
reform. It contains also some interesting glimpses of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, and throws light on his methods of trans- 
acting public business. "Faith in God to make all things 
possible that are right; faith in man to get them done," are 
words of Mr. Riis which give the keynote of his spiritual 
philosophy, and furnish at the same time the explanation 
of how he accomplished so much against such overwhelm- 
ing odds. The book is rich in illustrations taken from the 
author's home life in Denmark and from the scenes and 
actions of his life in America, and point the text in a strik- 
ing manner. 

The Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $2.00. 

Mr. P. Maurice McMahon divides his book 

From Fair of poems, "From Fair Hawaiiland," into 
Hawaiiland. five parts: "Hawaiian Poems;" "California 
Poems;" "Love and Sentiment;" "Miscel- 
laneous Poems," and "Religious Poems," some fourscore in 
all. It is to be regretted that the quantity is no guarantee 
for the quality of the verse, of which latter the less said the 
better. 

Stanley, Taylor Co., Publishers. San Francisco. 



A short story, but one which, like 

The March of the everything Mr. Gilbert Parker writes, 
White Guard. is not without merit, is "The March of 
the White Guard." At one of the Hud- 
son Bay Company's posts, word is received that a civil en- 
gineer of some reputation, who has gone into the far north 
to investigate some mines, has not returned, and his wife, 
aided by the Hudson Bay Company, is desirous that a relief 
expedition be fitted out to find and rescue him. Several 
men volunteer. They are dressed in white blankets from 
head to foot, white woollen capotes covering their gray fur 
caps; whence the name: "The White Guard." Their leader 
is Jaspar Hume, who has a particular reason for wanting to 
find Varre Lepage. As youths they had studied and been 
graduated from the same college. Jaspar has an invention, 
which his friend steals from him during a temporary ab- 
sence. He sells it for a large sum of money, then marries 
the woman upon whom Jaspar had set his heart. For 
the sake of the woman he once loved, Jaspar Hume leads 
the relief party to the Barren Grounds. After many hard- 
ships through the frozen North, they discover Lepage al- 
most lifeless in the snow, and carry him back to the Fort. 
When he regains health and strength he would fain make 
amends to the friend he has wronged, and insists on telling 
his wife all the truth. But Hume refuses, and softened by 
his remorse and shame, exacts from the man who has 
wronged him a promise that neither the world nor his wife 
shall ever guess the truth. Eventually Hume achieves a 
still greater triumph in engineering science, and receives 
his reward. The story is told with power and dash, and all 
the charm for which the writer is noted. 

R. F. Fenno & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 50 cts. 
At a meeting of the "International Con- 
Tuberculosis, gress for the Study of the Best Way to 
Combat Tuberculosis as a Disease of the 
Masses," which convened at Berlin, May 24-27, 1899, the sum 
of 4,000 marks was donated by two Berlin merchants, lay 
members of the Congress, as a prize to be offered for the 
b"st essay on the subject, "Tuberculosis as a Disease of the 
Masses, and How to Combat it." Eighty-one essays were re- 
ceived, that of Dr. S. A. Knopf of New York securing the 
Congress prize. At a meeting of the German Central Com- 
mittee it was resolved to publish this essay, and arrange for 
its widest distribution. The translation now presented to 
the English-speaking world for the first time is by the author 
himself, who sums up his opinion in these words: "To 
combat consumption successfully requires the combined 
action of a wise Government, well-trained physicians and an 
intelligent people." Dr. Knopf's most interesting and in- 
structive pamphlet should be read by every man and woman 
who is willing to lend a hand in this combat against our com- 
mon foe, the "Great White Plague." 

M. Firestack, Publisher, New York. Price, 25 cents. 

"To the workers on the Yukon, who 

The Goldsmith through the long, cold winter of national 
of Nome. neglect, have been patiently working 

while watching and waiting for the ice 
to melt," is the dedication of a little work of verse by Mr. 
Sam C. Dunham, entitled, "The Goldsmith of Nome." Mr. 
Dunham was in 1897-98 under assignment to Northern 
Alaska as a Statistical Expert of the Department of Labor. 
These verses are presented, the author says, "as an appeal 
from the tax-burdened and unrepresented people of Alaska 
to the Government at Washington for relief from the wrongs 
which they have borne too patiently for twenty years." 

Whitaker & Ray Co., San Francisco. Price, {1.00. 



Books Received. — Drexel Biddle: "Biggs's Bar, and Other 
Klondike Ballads," by Howard V. Sutherland, Price, 75 cents. 

MARY E. BDCKNALL. 



Most every one who has whiskey for sale compares its vir- 
tues to Jesse Moore "AA" Whiskey. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



January 25. 1902. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 




Marconi, dear. I greatly fear. 

With nil your fame and such, 
As an inventive genius you 

Are not so very much. 

Perhaps, dear Marc, you've found a spark 

Transmittant clean to Mars. 
To make communications with 

The planets and the stars; 

But while afar, 'twixt star and star 

Your wireless system whirrs. 
Why don't you keep the circuit good 

Betwixt your heart and hers? 

The teary sentimentalists who have been proclaiming 
Folsom a second Siberia and sobbing over ex-convicts, must 
feel proud of the work some of their proteges have been 
doing this week. The deadly business at Valencia and Six- 
teenth streets Tuesday morning has made the whole town 
shudder. Four cut-throats were out looking for prey. Police- 
man Robinson met them, and without warning one of them 
fired at him, fracturing his jaw. Another rushed up and fired 
three shots into the prostrate man. They ran, and one of 
them was brought down by a shot from Policeman Taylor. 
Robinson died within a few hours. The wounded footpad 
will recover. He is an ex-convict. The town is full of them, 
so is the Broadway jail. There are one hundred and forty 
of them there awaiting trial — burglars, thugs, murderers. 
Their trials are delayed, and they will probably get off with 
light sentences. Mr. Charles Montgomery and his mate, 
ex-convict something-or-other, are doing their best toward 
that end. There's another of the penitent ex-convict stripe 
in Oakland — the brute who has been terrifying little girls. 
He has been doing the Salvation Army pose since leaving 
prison. Folsom and San Quentin are too good for these 
wretches. They are murderers at heart, depraved, anar- 
chistic, worthless. Severity in our prisons and among the 
Judges would help matters — and I'm not sure but some sort 
of punishment administered to "ex-con" sympathizers would 
bring about good results. 

Really San Francisco has the most thoughtless hogs in 
the world. I never saw anything like it. Monday a band of 
future hams and sides of bacon was being driven along 
Brannan street. James Crowley, who works in sewers, was 
pursuing his peaceful avocation. The manhole was open. 
Suddenly, before Mr. Crowley knew what was happening, 
a two-hundred-pound hog came tumbling on top of him. Now, 
two hundred pounds of hog, falling a distance of nine feet, 
gives quite a jolt. Mr. Crowley says so, and he ought to 
know. The hog wasn't hurt, and, feeling very much at 
home, wandered down the sewer to the entrance. I contend 
that a hog has no business falling into a sewer and jolting 
an Irishman. Hogs have a right to take half of the sidewalk, 
two seat in a street car, or to jab people with canes and um- 
brellas — but they have no right to fall on Irishmen working 
in sewers. 

A daily paper, in commenting on the case of Mrs. Foote, 
who is slowly recovering from the effects of an assault by 
two companions, with whom she had been holding midnight 
revels, calls the case a "pitiful" one. That adjective hardly 
fits the case. It is sordid, low, depraved, vicious, but not 
pitiful. Mrs. Foote, according to her own testimony, went 
out on a lonely bat, and picked up the man and woman who, 
when they got her drunk enough, robbed her, incidentally 
breaking her jaw, and otherwise injuring her. A man who 
goes out, gets full, and is robbed, deserves little sympathy, 
and a woman less. In the interests of justice, the people 
who committed this assault upon Mrs. Foote should be 
given all the years at Folsom that the law allows; but 
don't bestow maudlin sympathy upon Mrs. Foote, or upon 
any woman who does the cocktail route at midnight. 



The newspapers made a deal of romance out of the death 
of rhester nilllngs. who starved to death on the Band near 
I.ake Men '.;. It Is a pitiable and a terrible thing 

that any man should die for the lack of sufficient food, but 
If a man courts starvation what are we going to Jo about It? 
The fact that Billings was a poet perhaps added glamor to 
his death, but is it any more Just that the poet should be fed 
by the ravens than that the stone-mason should be fed 
by the crows? Billings knew that ne was unable to make a 
living selling his wares — few poets are, alas! — then why 
didn't he go to work for a living and pursue poetry merely 
as a diversion? Bobble Burns was not above turning a penny 
at work In a customs house, and even great Tennyson, aside 
from his private fortune, received a pension from the 
English Government. Poets, my dears, you must remember 
that It Is all very glorious to follow the example of Chatter- 
ton, but that Chatterton never got far in the world of let- 
ters. 

"The Duke of Manchester married Miss Zimmerman be- 
cause he was a bankrupt and needed money," says Colonel 
N. B. Knight, father of Portia Knight, who extracted $50,000 
from the Duke as a little balm for her wounded feelings. 
The Duke should prosecute the Colonel for libel. The idea! 
Married for her money! Who ever heard of such a thing? 
Every one knows that foreign dukes and such marry Ameri- 
can girls out of pure kindness and goodness of heart. Of 
course, if there is any money lying around loose, they are 
willing to annex some of it for the benefit of their creditors 
— but as for marrying for money, that's preposterous! Now, 
on the quiet, I'll tell you the real reason why Dukes and 
such marry American girls — they are too well known at 
home to get English wives. But Colonel Knight, since his 
daughter got $50,000 of the good money papa Zimmerman 
furnished, shouldn't say a word. 

Los Angeles is going to have bull-fights. Wow! What a 
gory city Los Angeles must be, and what a fruitful field 
for a Society for the Prevention of, etc. I make no bar- 
room jest when I say that the bull fight, moderated accord- 
ing to the American statutes, is a fierce ordeal — for the 
spectators. The savage animal is considerately teased with 
banderillos (is that the right word?), with adhesive rubber 
tips, and the fearless toreadors spank and belabor the beast 
with wooden swords. I don't know which is the more pain- 
ful to see — the real Mexican hack and butcher slaughter- 
house game or such a hybrid spectacle as is about to be wit- 
nessed in Los Angeles. The real bull-fight is bad': the imita- 
tion is little better. 

City and County Attorney Lane, you made a just decision 
when you ruled that there was no statute that could pre- 
vent the relatives of the dead from placing bodies in vaults 
of the cemeteries inside the city limits. You could not 
revoke the arbitrary decree of the Board of Health to the 
effect that the family plots inside these inoffending limits 
shall be rendered useless and that funerals shall be held 
at the behest of stand-in corporations out Baden way. 
You cannot make and unmake laws, but you have done well 
according to your powers. Meanwhile I might suggest that 
the Board of Health take care of the living and let the 
dead alone. 

Secretary Frank J. Kane, of the Pacific Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals and Children, is in trouble 
again. I can't give a detailed account of it, because Mr. 
Kane's title takes up so much room — but it seems that a 
Mrs. Parker came up here from Stockton with her eleven- 
year-old daughter, Ida. Mr. Kane called at her lodgings and 
took the child away. Why he did so he doesn't explain. 
He has given several explanations of what he did with the 
child, but she can't be found. I'd hate to see Mr. Kane ar- 
rested for kidnapping, but I think it's up to him to tell what 
became of Ida Parker. 

Professor Paul Plato Poze is not the only smooth poser 
in San Jose. There is Rev. Mr. John Pickford, the evangel- 
ist, who has the dead-wood on most gentlemen of the cloth 
by having gone to Heaven and studied his ground. Mr. Pick- 
ford only tells in a general way what he saw in the Abode 
of the Saints, but I know that he has been making good capi- 
tal out of that former visit to Headquarters. I tell you, a 
trip abroad is a great thing for the education of a profes- 
sional man! 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




(President Joseph F. Smith of the Mormon Church has de- 
creed that all the employees of the Desert News, a Mor- 
mon paper in Salt Lake, must be married before the 30th of 
June next.) 

We are thirty odd reporters of the Salt Lake Desert News, 
Solitary are our blessings, misogynic are our views, 
But, behold, the Law of Mormon on our calm horizon bobs 
And decrees we'll have to marry or resign our little jobs. 

In the Region of the Prophets, blown by Utah's salty air, 
"Marry Early, Marry Often," is the motto everywhere, 
And e'en the chronic bachelor who rustles for the press 
Isn't left the boon traditional of single blessedness. 

E'en the little printer's devil must go doubles with his Mame, 
And the foreman and compositors must each one do the 

same, 
Also the city editor, his prestige to maintain, 
Must start a Mormon harem ere the sprouting of the grain. 

Blame us not if in impatience we hysterically spoon. 

We will do a wholesale business in the nuptial month of 

June, 
And as matrons here are plenty and as pretty maids are few, 
Send a batch of single ladies out to Utah, P. D. Q. 

We are thirty odd reporters of the Salt Lake Desert News, 
Solitary are our blessings, mysognic are our views; 
But a certain Mormon paper, in this crisis grave and solemn, 
Drives some very lively bargains in its matrimonial column. 

• • * 

Mayor Schmitz, upon entering office, made a beautiful 
speech about the merits of economy in municipal affairs, and 
it appealed to all classes. Those who listened to and read 
Ihe Mayor's words could not understand why it was that 
within a week there was a new janitor at the City Hall, 
an innovation that certainly looked like extravagance. 

It is explained in this way: Mayor Schmitz appointed his 
friend the violinist, Mr. Blum, his head usher, and Mr. Blum 
considered it a very great honor. It was during the cold 
weather that Mayor Schmitz entered upon his duties of office 
and he found the Mayor's apartments the temperature of the 
Klondike. He called every one to him to ask why there 
were no fires. Every one pointed to Mr. Blum, and he 
answered: 

"What have I to do with fires?" 

There was a chorus, "You are to build them." 

"Where is the janitor?" interrogated Mr. Blum. 

"You are he," said every one. 

"I am the usher." 

"The Mayor's usher always builds the fires," Mr. Blum was 
informed. 

Then he stormed into the office of Mayor Schmitz, and he 
made a speech like this: 

"Gene, I have fiddled with you for years, and you pretend 
to be a friend of mine, and the best you could do for me 
was to make me janitor!" 

The Mayor tried persuasion, but the musician was obsti- 
nate, and the next day a janitor was engaged to do Mr. 
Blum's duties for him. 

He is still usher. 

• • • 

School Director Roncovieri, the musical appointee of our 
musical Mayor, is very much impressed with the magnitude 
of his job, and following the pattern of our esteemed Presi- 
dent, is trying to introduce the "strenuous life" into the 
public schools. I had a talk with this strange outgrowth of 
musical politics this week, and I have some vivid memories 
of Mr. Roncovieri's outline of his policy. 

"I will cleanse this school system," he cried with a 
Roosevelt flourish. "I have just found a man employed In 
a responsible position in our public schools who is drawing 



a salary of $200 a month, and is not working more than 
three hours a week. I will have no more of this. He must 
surrender his position to a man worthy the trust. I will 
dc away with these incompetent teachers if I have to dis- 
charge every man and woman under our employ. I intend 
to appropriate the Normal School building and devote it 
to the overflow from the other schools — to those poor little 
children whom it is our sacred duty to rear and educate." 
This and plenty more, for the musical director is a good 
man at making promises. Perhaps this faculty — aside from 
the fact that he was the leader of a band — did a great deal 
toward inheriting for him the shoes of Mrs. Kincaid. 

• * * 

Mr. J. P. Morgan, Baron Rothschild and Mr. J. J. Astor 
should certainly have no bills of long standing. Yet on the 
books of a certain Italian inn-keeper of Manila there are liq- 
uor bills of considerable size chalked up beside the names 
of these gentlemen. 

Of course they did not consume the liquor. Three privates 
of a retired volunteer regiment did. They approached the 
guileless Italian shortly after the occupation of Manila . 
and explained that, for the time being, they were without 
funds, but that remittances were expected. For quite a 
while the inn-keeper ministered unto the ungodly thirst of 
the trio until one day he heard that their regiment was or- 
dered to another island. He searched high and iow for the 
thirsty three, but they could not be found. Finally he took 
the bill to their Colonel. 

The officer read the names and rolled to the floor laugh- 
ing. Then he recovered himself and informed the inn-keeper 
that his three guests were bilks. 

The Italian tore his hair with grief and rage. "J. P. 
Morganio, ladrone!" he shrieked. "Baron Rothschild one 
son of a pig! J. J. Astor one damn thief!" 

And to this day that Italian prays to all his saints to bring 
down a curse on the heads of J. P. Morgan, Baron Roths- 
child and J. J. Astor, "ladrones." 

• * • 

'William H. Taft is a very busy man," said Mr. Jack Lou- 
don in one of the news novelettes which he ran in the Ex- 
aminer this week. There is more truth than Action in that, 
as the Examiner people know only too well. When the mili- 
tary Governor arrived in port last Monday night, his boat 
was fairly surrounded with newspaper tugs, each laden with 
stars of the profession and all clamoring for an interview. 
Governor Taft evidently was too busy at the time to talk 
with the press, and he gave his subordinates orders to keep 
the reporters off the boat. There was a lively tussle between 
the reporters and the sailors, but before the tugs could be 
persuaded to withdraw from the scene of action, Governor 
Taft was obliged to send out type-written statements about 
the Philippines, their development, their future, etc. The 
Examiner got the type-written slips as well as the rest, but 
vou wouldn't have thought so when you read that paper the 
next morning. That statement was printed in black-faced 
type in the middle of the front page, and headed, "Especially 
written for the Examiner by William H. Taft." Although 
the Call and Chronicle published the same "interview" al- 
most word for word, they said nothing about "written es- 
pecially for." In journalism up-to-date, the importance of 
a piece of news depends largely upon the kind of type you 

use. 

• * • 

The Misses Spreckels are going to give a rival masque on 
the night of the Mardi Gras ball, and they are going to allow 
the men to wear dominoes — does that signify anything to 
you? You see, there "is some degree of dissatisfaction in 
both art and society circles because the men will not be 
allowed to cover their faces this year, and the council where- 
ir, the swells and the bohemians met to discuss the resuming 
of the old domino broke up in something like a row, and there 
was a great deal of ill feeling among the artists who argued 
that if the men were not allowed to mask they would not 
appear in costume, and that if the masculine display were 
lacking the ball would be an artistic fizzle. It was not on 
account of the artists, of course, that the Spreckels girls 
decided to give the rival show, but they demonstrated their 
proverbial commonsense when they saw that in a private 
all-society aggregation of men, none would presume to make 
manifest the "natural man" behind his disguise. 



January 25. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



lljr the wax. <io you remember tho misdemeanor that 
I tho row that banished forarer tbi ■ the 

masculine revelers at the Hopkins Institur 

lardi Oras ball oft the slate for one season? At tho 
Mardl Oras four years ago an Elizabethan courtier (masked) 
approached a lone lady (masked) and enquired if she was 
engaged for the next dance. 

"Pardon me. sir, I do not know you." she said In Icy tones. 

"You haven't tho advantage of me — I'm taking na much 
risk as you arc," said the courtier. 

The offended lady proved to be a society leader of the first 
magnitude, and she subsequently stirred up such a row that 
the male behind the mask was scornfully stamped as "the 
natural man" and banished utterly. 

* • * 

And now the artists and newspaper men are talking of 
getting up a Mardi Gras of their very own — a regular Ji-yvll 
of a Mardi Gras with annual reminders of Paris and New 
Orleans. The affair, they say, could be a yearly wedding 
of Art and Bohemia, and could be preceeded by a grand 
pageantry through the streets and up to the very doors of 
the Institute. That would be something like it. But there 
is no need of the street parade if the people in charge of 
the affair woulJ awake to the fact that the kind of a Mardi 
Gras we had last year, and are offered this year, is silly and 
ridiculous, entirely foreign to the spirit supposed to be rep- 
resented. What could be more bizarre than a carnival where 
the women are allowed to come masked, while the men are 
not. No man is going in costume unless masked, so it will 
merely resolve it into a fancy-dress affair on the ladies' 
part, with a lot of dismal-looking men in evening dress try- 
ing to be gay. There is time yet to make a new ruling, and 
I hope the people in charge will sacrifice a little of their 
prudery to art and the carnival spirit. 

* * * 

General Funston came home from the Philippines and 
found a son and heir awaiting him. Immediately the General 
and his wife debated as to the boy's name. Naturally, to Mrs. 
Funston, the General is the greatest of heroes, and she 
insists that he shall be named Frederick. The warrior, how- 
ever, declares that the hoy ought to be christened "McAr- 
thur Funston" for the General of that name. 

Then Mrs. Funston explains that a boy should bear his 
father's name anyway. The General, who is only about five 
feet tall, answers all arguments with: 

"You, my dear, are a tall woman. The baby, nine chances 
out of ten, will be a six-footer, and then I shall have the 
humiliating experience of having my son pointed out as 
'Big Fred Funston,' while my old name of 'Little Fred' will 
stick to me. We'll get around that by calling him McAr- 
thur." 

* * * 

The news which comes from Paris of the divorce of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Gardner is the latest, but not the last 
chapter, in the decidedly mottled career of the man in- 
volved. In the early days of the old Bush-street theatre, 
Gardner, who was making an honest enough living as an 
assayer, took a violent fancy to Carrie Swain, who was 
playing the leading role in "Cad the Tomboy." Despite the 
fact that Gardner had a wife waiting patiently for him in the 
East, his relations with the Swain woman were pretty well 
known, and caused all kinds of talk. 

That all the remarks made about them had a foundation 
in fact was demonstrated when one day they sailed away 
on the same steamer for Australia. Of course, it created a 
sensation, and Gardner's wife came from the Bast with the 
intention of following them. She was dissuaded from this, 
and contented herself with a divorce. 

In the Antipodes, Gardner had a varied career, posing for 
a while as Carrie Swain's manager. Then he turned his at- 
tention to mining, gaining the support of several wealthy 
Londoners. He wound up his affair by becoming mixed up 
in a huge scandal, narrowly missing going to jail. Gard- 
ner then shifted his headquarters to Mexico, where his 
Australian experiences were repeated, with the addition 
that he was concerned in a horse-racing fraud. Between the 
two he cleaned up a fortune, hut his methods resulted in the 
retirement of Tod Sloane from the English turf. 

Then Gardner conducted some swindling mining opera- 
tions in this State, coming out as usual with a load of money 



and V- • -., wife 

in San Fraiulmo foi several weeks four years ago. 
but k- I. No* it has .ill w ( .\ind up by Mrs. Qai 

ins a djYOTCO from h-i husband, with (lie settlement of 
a large fortune upon her. 
Gardner's < uiecr Is a good example of the financial buc- 
I man may sometimes achieve If be is willing to sacri- 
fice honor, decency, self-respect and the respect of the 
world. He has money, but no honor In his own country, or 
any other. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, Sun Francisco. 



T r '•■' ■ mill dinner. SO cent*, at Fcllx'i Rotl.Aerle. 537 California street, be 
ow Kearny : Sunday dlnnor, 75o. Boat French restaurant In town 



-If your doctor prescribes whiskey, order Jesse Moore every 



This man is fav- 
ored with two of 
the greatest bles- 
sings that can be 
bestowed — one 
on the seat be- 
side him, the 
other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

MARKET and TENTH STS. 




tStudebaKer, 



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Established in 1729 

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AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 




RAGING 



EVERY WEEK DAY. RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp. 

Ferryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1.1:30. 2:30 and 3 p. m., 
connecting with trains stopping at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferry liokets to Shell Mound, Last two cars on train reserved for ladies 
and their escorts. No smoking. All trains via Oaktand Mole connect with 
San Pablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadway, Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue electric cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric cars go direct to the 
track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning—Trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 p. m, and immediately 
after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, Jb., President. 

ORAS. F. PRICE. Secretary and Manager. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Phelan Bldg. Tel. Main 5387 8an Francisco, Gal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




_ 



_ 



ociety 




Not for many a year has San Francisco had so gay a sea- 
son as the one just passing, and for once the young folks 
are confessing to almost as much dancing as they care for. 
The whole month of January has been notable for the number 
of Its dances; and what a merry week this has been, with 
the Presidio hop to start off with, Mrs. Kittle's dance for 
Miss Scott, the Alumni ball at Golden Gate Hall, the cotil- 
lion of the Entre Nous Club, and the Huntington ball last 
night, to say nothing of the dinners, luncheons, teas and at 
homes which have been of daily occurrence. 

The H. E. Huntington home was aglow with bright colors, 
red predominating, last Saturday afternoon, and presented 
a most inviting interior when contrasted with the rain and 
damp of the outside air. To say there was a crowd would 
be to put it mildly, so many called to congratulate the 
fair young debutante, Miss Edith, for whom the tea was 
given by her aunt and cousin. She looked charming in a 
red gown trimmed with white lace, which was most becom- 
ing to her. Roses and violets have been the favorite flowers 
at the at homes this month. They were seen in profusion at 
the reception given by Mrs. Cyrus Walker and Mrs. Ira 
Pierce, and again in great beauty at Mrs. Borel's tea, vio- 
lets being much affected by the entire Borel family. 
Their San Mateo home is surrounded with beds of that sweet 
blossom, furnishing unlimited quantities for their house in 
town. Mrs. Tom Bishop led off with a large luncheon on 
Monday; her guests were all married ladies, with the ex- 
ception of Miss Kane and Miss Nuttall, and were fourteen 
in number. Mrs. Fred Tallant's luncheon on Tuesday was 
complimentary to her sister, Miss Pearl Landers, and was 
a very elaborate and beautiful affair. Forty-two guests com- 
posed the party of young matrons and belles. They were 
seated at five tables, each decorated in different colors. 
Ferns, carnations, daffodils, roses, and tulips were used. 
Many of Mrs. Tallant's guests were present later in the after- 
noon at the tea which Mrs. H. B. Chase gave for Miss Marie 
Landsdale of Philadelphia, who was also one of those pres- 
ent at Mrs. Tallant's luncheon. 

Another small tea of Tuesday was the one given by Mrs. 
Nellie Hyde-Smith. The final at home of Mrs. Walter Dean 
at the Palace on Monday was probably the largest of the 
three she and Miss Helen have given this month. But it is 
a way ladies have when there are several to choose from of 
leaving until the last day the call that must be made, and 
hence a crush often results. On Wednesday Miss Helen was 
a tea hostess to a party of young girls. Yesterday Mrs. El- 
llnwood and Miss Charlotte Ellinwood had their first at 
home, and among other recent events are Mrs. Greenwood's 
tea for Mrs. Hearst, Mrs. Van Ness's luncheon and Mrs. 
McCutcheon's dinner at Marchand's. This afternoon society 
will be out In full force at the ball game in Central Park, 
for the benefit of the Doctor's Daughters, and to-night takes 
place the long-anticipated wedding of Miss India Scott and 
Mr. Arthur Spear. 

First among the hostesses next week will be Mrs. J. R. 
K. Nuttall, who on Monday will give a tea in honor of Miss 
Nadine Nuttall; Miss Maud Mullins will be guest of honor 
at Mrs. Dutton's luncheon, the ladies of the Century Club 
are to have their afternoon dance of the minuet, the Bal 
Poudre will become an accomplished fact, and the Friday 
Fortnightlies will have their final dance of the season. 

Mrs. Alexander Center has, owing to ill health, appeared 
so seldom as an entertainer the past two years that her 
friends have been delighted to receive the cards which tell 
them she and bonnie Miss Bessie will be at home on Satur- 
day, February 1st, and that they will all be there is a fore- 
gone conclusion. Mrs. B. C. Howard of Japan has been the 
guest of Mrs. Center of late. 

The San Francisco people who are shivering in the rather 
cold weather we are having lately, may well envy the guests 
at Del Monte who are basking in sunshine. 



The first ten days of February promise to break the 
record, not so much in quantity as in quality, for though 
there is always a crush of events towards the end of the 
ante-Lenten season there will be more dances than usual. 
Every evening has been appropriated, and among the most 
notable are the Chrysanthemums' dance, the second Green- 
way ball, Mrs. Lester's dance, the last La Jeunesse, Mrs. 
Athern Folger's cotillion at the Palace, and finally and best 
of all the Mardi Gras ball at the Art Institute. The Chry- 
santhemums, who wavered a little in favor of a vaudeville 
show for their annual entertainment in aid of their bed in 
the Children's Hospital, have gone back to their first love 
and decreed that it shall be a dance as usual, and next 
Saturday evening it will take place at Cotillion Hall. The 
hours are early, from nine till twelve, but these dances have 
been so pleasant in the past there is little doubt the coming 
one will be equally so. The third of February is a magic 
date, the one set for the second of the Greenway dances. 
The first one more than equaled every anticipation, and Mr. 
Greenway has been overwhelmed with compliments and con- 
gratulations. Whether he will consent to resume his 
scepter and rule again as in the past, is the question not yet 
satisfactorily answered, but that he will decide on saying 
"yes" everyone hopes. So many rumors were in circulation 
regarding there being no Mardi Gras ball at the Art Insti- 
tute this year the delight is great at the announcement 
that it will take place as usual on Shrove Tuesday night. 

Mrs. Worthington Ames will give her initial entertainment 
as a 3'oung matron on Tuesday, the fourth of February, when 
she will give a tea at which her sister, Miss Edith Preston, 
is to be guest of honor. 

Miss Kate Brigham is pressing the other popular debu- 
tantes very closely. She has been the motif for so many 
pretty gatherings since her coming out ball. The green and 
white luncheon given her at the Knickerbocker by Miss 
Louise Harrington was one of the prettiest affairs of the 
season, and the party of fourteen young girls a charming 
one to look upon. Next week Mrs. Willie Babcock will give 
a dinner for Miss Kate at her villa in San Rafael. Mrs. 
Warfield has planned a novel and what promises to be the 
jolliest kind of a party for next Saturday, which is to make 
the ascent of Mt. Tamalpais, where they will spend the night 
and return to town on Sunday afternoon. The tavern at the 
summit is provided with every accommodation to make the 
affair delightful, even should the weather prove all that it 
ought not to be, as it has a habit of doing on such occasions. 
The party will number about forty, all young people, and 
dancing will be one of the items arranged for their enjoy- 
ment. 

Everything that is implied in the term "first-class" is in 
evidence at the Earlcourt Hotel, 1011 Pine street, San Fran- 
cisco. It is the smallest and most exclusive family hotel in 
the city. Years were spent in fitting it up, and a fortune 
has been expended in the furnishings. It is divided into 
suites, each with individual fittings, and all through an air 
of quiet elegance is maintained. The grill is a special fea- 
ture, no expense being spared in that department. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin has been importuned by young and old 
to postpone her departure until the penitential period is 
actually here. But is it, after all, to be a time of fasting and 
sackcloth in the swim? Assuredly not, unless it is another 
case of false report which comes from New York to the effect 
that Mrs. Oelrichs and Mrs. Birdie Fair-Vanderbilt will 
leave next Saturday for a six weeks' visit to California. The 
Lenten season will therefore probably be enlivened with a 
series of luncheons and dinner parties in honor of these 



VISITING CARDS 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

and ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

S33 MARKET STREET. 



January 2S. 1902. 



• AN FRANCItCO NEWI LETTER. 



IS 



ladle*. Mrs. Oelrlcbs baa many friends here, who are all 
anxious to do her honor, and whenever abe appears upon our 
borlioo feasting Is In order until the round of tluui has 
been made. 

Miss Mary Kipp sends glowing accounts that she is en- 
Joying herself most thoroughly In Columbus, Ohio, where 
she Is visiting her sister, Mrs. Edle. She has been given din- 
ners, luncheons, dances and sleighing parties, and were It 
not for the extreme cold would willingly end her days in that 
hospitable place. 

Ex-Mayor Phelan has gone on a passear to New York, 
which may possibly be extended across the ocean, in which 
case we shall not see him again until summer is a thing of 
the past. Mr. and Mrs. I. \V. Hellman, Miss Florence Hell- 
man, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Grant, are among recent depart- 
ures for the East; news has been received of the safe ar- 
rival in Japan of Miss Kate Dillon and Miss Cosgrave; Mr. 
and Mrs. Downey Harvey are back again after their holiday 
visit to Gotham. 

The clear atmosphere after the rain has made the vicinity 
of the Hotel Rafael a paradise. The following guests are 
registered there: Mr. and Mrs. William H. Mills, Miss Grace 
Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Babin, Mrs. J. M. Litchfield, 
Mr. George Haas, Mrs. D. J. Gregor, Miss Bonner, Mrs. D. C. 
McLaughlin, Miss Isabel Lais McLaughlin, Miss Muir, Mr. 
J. H. Ervin, Miss Florence Reynolds, Mrs. Philip Malcolm. 

At the Palace Grill on Tuesday Mrs. Linda H. Bryan enter- 
tained most delightfully a dozen friends at a luncheon given 
in honor of Mrs. Henry E. Huntington. Mrs. Bryan's other 
guests were Mrs. George G. Carr, Mrs. Julius Reis, Mrs. 
Edward H. Hamilton, Mrs. S. P. Stowe of Santa Barbara, 
Mrs. Albert Galatin, Miss Rowena Burns, Miss Gertrude Jack 
of San Luis Obispo, Miss Ida Callahan, Miss Marie Voor- 
hies and Miss Mary Polhemus. At the Bryant home, 2422 
Buchanan street, on Saturday afternoon, Linda Bryan cele- 
brated the tenth anniversary of her birthday by entertaining 
a few of her friends most charmingly at a luncheon and thea- 
tre party. The table decorations were in red, and the little 
hostess, upon whom fell all the duties of entertaining her 
company, proved very capable in her duties. After luncheon 
the Red Riding Hood matinee was enjoyed. Those of the 
party were: Miss Linda Bryan, Miss Edith Bradbury, Miss 
Dorothy Danforth, Miss Vera Marjorie Irwin, Edward Pol- 
hemus and Carleton Bryan. 

Dr. Fitzpatrick, the dentist, has returned from an ex- 
tended tour of the United States, and is again located in the 
Murphy building, opposite the Hibernia Bank. 

Mrs. Ella Hotaling, accompanied by her two children, will 
shortly leave for New York, en route to Europe — where they 
will remain two years. 

Final arrangements for the Free Ward and Clinic benefit 
are being energetically pushed forward and fast nearing com- 
pletion. The programme is most attractive, and the play to 
be presented an entirely new one on this coast. Mr. Edwin 
Arden is well and most happily known, and "Zorah" is an- 
ticipated with interest. The ladies of the California Eye and 
Ear Hospital are untiring in their efforts to make the affair 
a financial success, and there is no question that January 
30th will be a social occasion of much note. 



The Sisters of the Order of St. Dominic, whose principal 
house is located at San Rafael, are rejoicing that the debt 
of $50,000 on their convent has been entirely wiped out. The 
entire indebtedness has been paid by private subscription 
under the supervision of Archbishop Riordan. The school 
at San Rafael has a larger enrollment of pupils than at any 
time in its history. 



Pictures and Frames. 
We have received during December over 100 patterns of 
entirely new things in mouldings, which we have not had 
time to open until now. The Beauty, Originality and Mod- 
erate Price of these mouldings will please every one having 
pictures to frame. On sale after this date. Sanborn, Vail 
& Co., 741 Market street. 




ANNUAL 

CLEARANCE SALE 



Discount 




NOW ON. 

vS. (& G. GUMP CO. 

113 GEARY ST. 



ART GOODS, 
PICTURES, 



PINE CROCKERY 

and GLASSWARE. 




A Party of Locomobilists Starting for a Day's Outing. 



When you drink Doyen Champagne, '93, you are drink- 
ing wine made in the best vintage year that wine men have 
known. Yet it sells for the price of ordinary wine. 



Model to he seen at The Salesroom of the Locomobile Co. of 
the Pacific, 1 622 to 1 628 Market St. 

Selling winter stock at cost. Give us a call. Mas. E. Jenkins. Latest 
styles in millinery. Telephone Polk 2880. 687 Geary street. 

SCARCF Books, Photographs, etc. Cataloeue. with samples, 11.00 
3Vanvi< Sealed lett „ p 0B t, a. ARTHUR, 6 Rue. I'Ecluse, Paris. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 



Financial 




According to the Bakersfield papers, 

Oil Companies Mr. J. D. Browne, who was directed by 

Above the Law. the State Mineralogist to gather tacts 

relating to the oil developments of 
Kern County for the State Mining Bureau, is not making 
much headway. The operators, it is said, either refuse his 
request for information or entirely ignore him, and under the 
circumstances it is impossible for him to make any adequate 
report. This is in keeping with the policy which has been 
maintained from the start by the majority of the oil com- 
panies floated in this city, who have persistently refused to 
comply with the law requiring them to make monthly re- 
ports of their condition. The management has ignored this 
law with a high and mighty air, as if they were above it, and 
the Exchange, with full power to enforce it, has calmly sub- 
mitted to the outrage. Had it been carried out every month 
in the way the mining companies do, publishing a monthly 
statement of their financial condition on a certain date, 
public confidence would have been maintained, and the gen- 
eral business would have been upon a sounder basis than at 
present. When companies resort to secrecy, there must be 
something to hide, something that shareholders may find out 
if they can by experting the books under an order of court, 
possibly, if they care to go to the trouble and expense. The 
easiest way would be to prosecute one or two of these com- 
panies and have them fined $100 as an example for then- 
impudence. There is no doubt at all that if the ways of a 
number of companies now appealing for public support were 
subjected to the light of a full and thorough investigation, 
some most extraordinary developments would result, account- 
ing for the dislike they have to conform with the law call- 
ing for monthly statements. The argument is offered that 
they are not mining companies in a sense, and therefore do 
not come under the statistics. This, however, is only a bluff 
upon the part of people who would not have a leg to stand 
on if the matter is ever pressed to an issue before the 
courts. Shareholders who rest content to be assessed out of 
their holdings at the will of a set of office holders who, 
likely enough, do not hold a share of the stock outside of the 
statutory requirements, fattening in haughty idleness upon 
collections levied as regularly and in the same arbitrary 
manner as those of an oriental potentate, deserve all they 
get, and are beyond the pale of sympathy. 

The action of the copper market, with 

The Drift of the consequent decline in prices, bears 

Copper Mining, hardly again upon the small producer 

all over the world, but more especially 
in California, where operating expenses are higher than else- 
where for obvious reasons. Many connected with the busi- 
ness say that there is method in the manipulation of the 
trust, and that the results evolved will drive all the small 
fry not worth picking up by the combine, into a corner, 
which will prevent the possibility of any important develop- 
ments in out of the way districts. Copper production in small 
quantities does not pay, and the miner acting independently 
will not be able to proceed with the development of his 
property, so that the chance of it becoming a factor in the 
market is reduced to a minimum. In this respect the ways 
of a powerful combination like that of the Amalgamated 
Copper Syndicate are mysterious but far reaching. 

The annual election of the San 
New Board Controls Francisco Gas & Electric Company 
Gas & Electric. has passed, and the shareholders 
are no longer in doubt as to the 
men who will control the destinies of the corporation in the 
future. The Rudolph Spreckels combination, as expected, 
swept the deck, and upon them now rests the onus of re- 
trieving the past by placing the company once more upon a 
paying basis. Mr. William B. Bourn has been elected Presi- 
dent and Mr. A. D. Greenwood Secretary. The Directors are: 
Messrs. George H. Collins, W. J. Dutton, J. Downey Harvey, 
C. Osgood Hooker, F. B. King, E. J. McCutcheon, L. F. Mont- 



eagle, D. T. Murphy. A. H. Payson, and Rudolph Spreckels. 
It was announced in the course of the proceedings that the 
company will entirely abandon the manufacture of coal 
gas, and will devote itself entirely to the production of 
water gas, the plant for which will be at once enlarged. 
The value of realty, plant, etc., owned by the company, is 
estimated at over $14,000,000. The President's report showed 
a large business transacted during the past year, with a gain 
of 3,462 gas consumers and 4,286 electric consumers. There 
is now every reason to believe that nothing will be left un- 
done to build the business up again to a point where the 
shareholders will get some remuneration from their invest- 
ment. 

Business continues to drag with 
The Pine-St. Market, the brokers on Pine street, and this 

is due in a large measure to the 
action of professionals on the street themselves. Any one 
who suggests even a likelihood of improved conditions in 
the business, which has kept them in clover for years, is 
looked upon in anything but a friendly light, while the man 
who makes himself in any way prominent in affording finan- 
cial support to the market is an enemy upon whom the 
diction of the gutter can be heaped with unbridled license. 
This seems strange to the uninitiated, who are unacquainted 
with the ways of Pine street. An upward movement in 
any stock is the signal for the clique to jump in and hammer 
it back where it belongs, according to their views of the busi- 
ness. Of course, if no one cares to oppose an action of this 
kind, that settles it. There can only be one result, and that 
is annihilation eventually. It does not require any peculiar 
range of vision to predict the outcome, and the blame can 
rest upon the shoulders of manipulators who, with self-in- 
terest at stake, sit tamely down until they are hammered 
out of existence. Theirs the fault, and to them the conse- 
quences. The North-end stocks have been the main object 
of attack of late. They were the main support of the market, 
and to weaken their underpinning was to lower prices else- 
where. In view of the money which has been expended of late 
in modernizing the system on the Comstock, and new work 
already outlined for the future, it will be interesting to 
note the course of events on Pine street, upon which so 
much depends. There, it must be confessed, the outlook just 
now is anything but bright. 

Outside of a decline in Alaska Packers, 

The Local which, by the way, has been anticipated 

Stock Market, by the talent, although none have had the 

nerve or money to tackle it on the short 
side, the week has been uneventful on the Stock and Bond 
Exchange. There have been some light changes in lighting 
shares, but they amounted to nothing in the long run in the 
matter of either gain or loss in prices, working out about 
even at the close. Sugars have been quiet and dull, with 
little doing in powders outside of Giant, which has been 
quoted at a lower range of values lately for some reason not 
exactly clear as yet. Other industrials have been lightly 
dealt in at prices which have prevailed for weeks past, and 
nothing has occurred to interject any life into the market for 
this line of securities. Some talk is still heard of combina- 
tions in gas, and possibly in the future this may come about, 
as in it lies the only solution of existing difficulties result- 
ing from competition and an over-dose of corporations now 
in the manufacturing field. All the changes which can be 
effected in the personnel of Boards of Directors will not 
serve to straighten out complications which individually the 
companies are unable to obliterate or avoid, while the at- 
tempt to clear one another off the field will only result in 
universal wreck. When common sense rules and calmer 
counsel prevails, united action will remedy the ills com- 
plained of to-day, but not till then. 

The annual meeting of the Mutual Savings Bank was held 
on Tuesday last, and the old board of officers was re-elected, 
as follows: Mr. James D. Phelan, President; Mr. S. G. Mur- 
phy, First Vice-President; Mr. John A. Hooper, Second Vice- 
President; Mr. George A. Story, Cashier and Secretary; 
Mr. C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier; Mr. Frank J. Sullivan, 
Attorney. The other Directors are Mr. James Moffltt, 
Mr. Robert McElroy, Mr. Charles S. Neal, Mr. J. M. McDon- 
ald, and Mr. Charles Holbrook. 



January 25. 1902. 



•AN FRANCISCO NEW! LETTER. 



•r 



Canadian Bank of 
Commerce. 



Th- annual mc-tln* of this hank, 
which roconllT ■ 

British Columbia In this . Itv. waa 
hold last week at Toronto, 
the head offlrcs of the company are located. Th.. net profits 
for the hnlf y. ir were M77.61S, to uhli-h ma 
»um of IlIT.sii.;. making a total of ».".:•:.. 171. out ol ■ 
dividend at the rate of 7 per ■ nnum waa 

aggregating 1280.000. The sum of »T... 

nslon fund, and (66,924 expended on baj I 
was charged to profit and loss account, and 1261,040 *i 

forward. The assets were quoted at *7" I the 

deposits at 261,679,366. The following Board of Dir- 
was re-elected to serve for the ensuing year: Hon. i; 
A. Cox. Mr. Robert Kllsr jr. Mr. \V. B. Hamilton. Mr. M. Leg- 
ktr. James Crathern. Mr. John Hoskin. K. ('. I.. I,. D.. 
Mr. J. W. Flanelle. Mr. A. Kingman, Hon. I,. M. Jones, and 
Mr. Frederick Nichols. 

The annual meeting of the Oceanic 
Steamship Company was held on 
Tuesday last, and the old Board of 
Directors was reelected: Messrs. 
Claus Spreckels, J. D. Spreckels. A. D. Spreckels. Fred Till- 
man. Jr., George Fritch, A. S. Tubbs, and W. D. K. Gibson. 
The annual report showed an indebtedness due to a number 
of unfortunate circumstances last year. It is believed, how- 
ever, that no assessment will be levied, and that the com- 
pany's earnings now will suffice to wipe out all the debts. 
There Is a bare possibility also that a bond issue, covering 
the deficit, may yet be made. 

Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from Janu- 
ary 14th to January 20th, 1902. 



The Oceanic 
Steamship Company. 



STOCKS. 



shab.es 

80I.D 

Caribou 25 $ 

Four Oil 230 

Hartford 29 

Home Oil 3,300 

Independence 2,000 

Kern Oil 12> 

Petroleum Center 8l,0u0 

Reed Crude Oil .. 2,787 

San Joaquin O A D Co 3J 

Oil City Petroleum 900 

Occidental of West Virginia 600 

Lion 3,125 

Sterling 4.100 

Monarch of Arizona 1,100 

Monte Cristo 150 

Peerless 22 

Imperial 100 

Junotion 4.2JO 

Los Angeles O- & T. Co 20 

Superior 200 

54.063 



RANGE OF 
PRICES 

66 @ ... 

50 @ 52 

90 HO @91 00 

3 60 O 3 75 

08 ® 

5 37KO 

4 @ 
38 ® 

6 75 
20 
20 



7 
39 



21 
21 



1 12K@ 1 20 
19 @ 

1 45 <S 

6 00 @ .... 

15 00 @ 

19 ® 
J 00 ® . 



21 



GBOSS 

SALES. 

16 

126 

2.M1 
12,145 

160 
671 

1,790 

1.082 
202 
166 
125 
250 

4.-16 
2il9 
217 
132 

1,500 
838 
20 
12 



It will surprise many to hear that the Original Vienna Bak- 
ery and Restaurant, at 205 Kearny street, wil close, and a 
matter of gratification to learn that it will re-open on 
O'Farrell street, near the Orpheum, where elegant quar- 
ters are being prepared for it. The change will be made on 
January 31st. The Vienna has been under the management 
of Mr. F. B. Galindo for the past three years, and has 
gained a reputation as a first-class place, high-grade in every 
respect. In the new quarters the same high state of perfec- 
tion will be maintained. The management of the Vienna 
will be glad to see old customers at the new place on Feb- 
ruary 1st. 



Stops the Cough and Works Off the Cold. 

Laxative Bromo-Quinine Tablets cure a cold in one day. No Cure, No Par. 
Price 25 cents. 



The International Sleeping Car and European Express 
Trains Co., the International Palace Hotels Co., and the 
Special Agency of the Trans-Siberian Railway, have estab- 
lished their General Passenger Agency at No. 17 New Mont- 
gomery street (.opposite main entrance of the Palace Hotel) 
this city, which the public will find a very convenient loca- 
tion. 



There are many ways of cleaning a carpet, but there 

is only one good way. Send it to Spaulding's Carpet Clean- 
ing Works, 353 Tehama street. Their process of cleaning 
carpets cannot be equalled. All the dirt is thoroughly re- 
moved without injury to the fabric, and the carpet is sent 
back looking like, a new one. 




In Principle «r»? 
Practice the 

PRESIDENT 
SUSPENDER 

11 01 J II, ..MM-,, M> M . 



J. O. IUrRo.V 

TIIl" HllKsRIi. 1st, - 

VIce-PrcMent I 



Ponn*iirof ( A ' M ' ' '■>**. 2nd. Vloe 

I. I M t 1'm-*Mc!iI. Of 

I ftrke A: Uflf I «. \ Fl)l| „ M Kl| . y vir K t..i» CUy 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE 



21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

/lining flachinery 



and 
Supplies 



Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 



ORIGINAL 

VIENNA * 
BAKERY * 
REMOVAL 

Next to the Or- 
pheum, 133-135 
'OFarrell St. * 

New quarters are being elegantly fitted 
for a first-class Bakery and Restaurant. 

ON 
FEB. 

1st. THE ORIGINAL VIENNA BAKERY 

Established 1876, will close at 205 Kearny 
St., and will move to their new and com- 
modious building. 

the best 

Coffee 

Chocolate 

Ice Cream 

Rolls 

Fine Pastry 

Excellent Cuisine 



F. B. GALINDO 



Proprietor. 



From Thomas', London 
MANUFACTURER OF 

Fine Shoes 

Near Waldorf-Astoria. BO WEST 34TH ST. 

Between 5tli Ave. and Broadway. New York. 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




W&M^\WW 



urance 




About this time of the year the various man- 

The Year, agers wonder what the other managers or the 
other companies have done. For the manager 
or the company that is amongst the "top notchers," the other 
fellows have nothing hut excuses, alleging luck, and fortune, 
and cut rates, extra commissions, and kindred crimes against 
legitimate underwriting practices. The other "chaps," whose 
loss ratio is far away and beyond the "average" tender ap- 
pologies as to inherited losses, claims carried over, and so 
forth, forgetting all the time that the record, year by year, 
stands for itself, and that results do ditto. 

The figures of the California business, first made public 
by the Pacific Underwriter, reveal a whole lot of surprises 
in the California fire underwriting business (the Coast fig- 
ures not yet being known), and the News Letter's prophecy 
that the loss ratio for the year in California would be within 
a cent or two of forty per cent, looks like a dream in a gale 
of wind in the face of a phenomenal ratio of 31.4. The year 
has been a wonder, and while the loss ratio for the Coast 
will not equal the figures for California, they will be low 
enough to make this territory the Mecca of every kinder- 
garten insurance scheme that ever was hatched — even those 
of West Virginia. 

Considering first the San Francisco premiums alone, the 
Firemans Fund wrote over $77,000 — loss ratio, 25.9. 

The London & Lancashire, under Colonel Macdonald's 
management, piled up almost $99,000, with a startling loss 
ratio of only 21.8. 

The Thuringia, Voss, Conrad & Co., reports figures for 
San Francisco at $106,307, and a loss ratio of only 26.3. 

Mr. George F. Grant, as usual, gets away with a nice 
little record for the London and the Northern, $83,472 in 
this county, with a loss ratio of 27.2. 

The Hartford, under Mr. Belden, writes $63,000 in the city, 
with a loss ratio of 30.9, just a fraction below the average. 

The Palatine, under the management of Mr. C. F. Mul- 
lins, gobbles in this city $44,000 of premiums, and with the 
Mullins' proverbial luck, gets off with an 8.4 loss ratio. 

The Royal Exchange, careful as it is, just gets in below 
the average, and Mr. Frank Dickson may congratulate him- 
self for writing in San Francisco $75,125 in premiums, with 
a loss ratio of just 30. 

The loss ratios given are on the city business, but not on 
the business of the State, while the premiums are for the 
city and county alone. In the business of the State at large 
the same startling results appear. The Firemans Fund, 
heading in premiums, "hands down" the list with $410,000; 
The Home of New York, $246,000; The Hartford, $223,000, 
and the Liverpool & London & Globe nearly $215,000. 

The medal for the highest loss ratio is won by the old con- 
servative "Gerard," which only "piked" on the Coast less 
than $5,000 in premiums, and the sky-rocket loss ratio of 
123.3, and the Girard, which did its underwriting from its 
home office has won the proud distinction of being the only 
company in California whose loss ratio needed three figures 
to explain it. 

Outside of the Palatine before referred to, the lowest 
ratio on a fair business is that of the reinsured Magdeburg — 
14 per cent on $45,000 of premiums, whilst its successor, the 
Little Reading, which is visiting the Coast for the third time, 
gets off for about three months' record with $13,000 and a 
5.5 loss ratio. The foreign companies seem to have a shade 
the best of it. In both premiums and loss ratio they wrote 
a trifle more business than the domestic companies, and 
made a loss of 31.1, while the Americans got 32.5, the general 
average for the State being 31.4. Thus the aliens got the 
best both on premiums received and on losses paid. 

The non-compact companies seem to have fared pretty 
well. The German of Freeport makes a loss ratio on a tidy 
amount of business of 19 per cent. The Milwaukee Mechan- 
ics' ratio is 23. The Germania wrote some $50,000, and lost 
lesB than the 8 per cent. Amongst those "who also ran" is 



the "King's County," Mr. F. J. Devlin, manager, which com- 
pany wrote by an effort almost $5,000 in premiums in the 
State, and made the dreamy kind of record of a less than 4 
loss ratio. The Citizens, under Mr. Belden, wrote nearly 
$25,000 and paid a loss ratio of 2.4, the lowest record of the 
year. It is the year of California, and in no State in the 
union will it or can it be equaled. The result will be as be- 
fore said in the News Letter, an influx of irresponsible com- 
panies to share the prosperity of the State. In 1891 San 
Francisco had a premium income to companies of almost 
the same amount it had in 1901, with the difference that 
in 1891 the loss ratio was 36.1; to the State in 1901 it was 
31.4, a tidy profit in the difference. In 1891 the premiums for 
the State were a million dollars less than in 1901, and the loss 
ratio decreased. If an evidence of prosperity were needed, 
it is here — an increase in premiums in a decade of a million 
and a decrease in loss ratios of over 5 per cent., and an av- 
erage for the State of 31.4. The Pacific Coast managers' 
profits pay the Eastern managers' losses. 

• • • 

The Pacific Mutual will submit to 
The Pacific Mutual, its policyholders and agents a splen- 
did report for the fiscal year end- 
ing December 31, 1901. The substantial growth, the superb 
condition of its business in every branch of its two de- 
partments, and the excellent returns to policyholders and 
beneficiaries, advance the company along the line to a point 
where comparison makes it rank among the most prominent 
companies in this country. From the annual statement, soon 
to be published, we quote a few salient items: The business 
written in the Life Department was $12,436,325, a gain over 
the previous year of $2,213,359. In the accident department 
the premiums on business written were $715,936, as compared 
with $689,181 for 1900, a gain of $26,755. Premiums collected 
in the life department alone were $1,208,064, as against 
$876,973 for the year 1900, an increase of $331,091. Surplus 
to policyholders, $857,613, as against $380,283 for 1900, a gain 
of $477,330. Assets as shown in this annual statement, 
$5,004,790; in last previous statement, $4,112,117; gain, 
$892,673. 

• • •" 

The sixteenth report of the Fire Underwriters' Inspection 
Bureau shows that "the total number of inspections made 
was 22,892, in addition to which there were 6,056 electrical 
inspections, 223 buildings were inspected while in course of 
construction, and 243 Special Hazard Reports were printed 
and duly filed in the offices of our members." The rapid in- 
crease in the use of electricity induced by competition is 
shown by the increase in electrical inspections, from 2,494 in 
1900 to 6,056 in 1901, the ground covered being virtually the 
same. The Municipal Department of Electricity is effectively 
supervising the installation of all new electrical work, but 
has no control over former work which may become danger- 
ous. An amendment to the present electrical ordinance 
giving such control is much needed. The expense of main- 
taining the Inspection Bureau for the year was but .442 of 
one per cent of the city premiums. 

• * • 

Colorado for the Aachen & Munich has been added to the 
Pacific Coast department under Mr. Caesar Bertheau, man- 
ager, and Mr. A. R. Grim, assistant manager. 

The Metropolitan Life is among the billionaires. There 
are four giants now in place of three. 

The Insurance Commissioners of several of the States are 
dubbing the Union Fire Insurance Company of Chicago a 
wild-cat, running only a "mail order" department. 

The South Dakota officials have revoked the license of 
one Mutual (Farmers') Hail Insurance Company, and 
one Live Stock Company. It is reported that the officers 
of the latter concern sold $7,000 worth of Farmers' notes for 
$2,000, and skipped. This percentage is far above the usual 
value of this class of companies' assets, and, as usual, the 
officers got away with all of it. 

The Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania has 
levied an assessment on its stockholders to make good its 
$41,000 impairment. In the past fifteen years the company 
had paid to its stockholders in dividends 102 per cent, or 
$204,000. The company is, from advices only, technically 
impaired, and it is confidently expected that the company 
will be saved. 



January 25. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1t 



The Railway Employees' annual meeting, just ,. 
ity. alter transacting a whole lot of 
nesa. sloppetl over and agreed on a plan t 
selves life and accident Insurance. Some day thi 

'" go inti the In- 
business. 

• • • 

.mlssioner Clunie is reported as being 
slightly better, and hopes are now held out for Ml 

• • • 

The Metropolitan has leased for a term of years the 
nine floor of the Callahan building, McAllister and M.i' 
for its Metropolitan district ofre 

• • • 

usual, the "burgee" flew from the Hag-staff of the 
Fireniaus Fund building on last Tuesday. The hosts gath 
and were wined, dined and smoked all in the same old 
way. (o which the passing years have educated. As 
also, there was no opposition ticket, and. the following 
Bl usual unanimously elected directors: Messrs. Wro. J. 
Uutton. Thomas S. Chard, J. C. Coleman. John Bermtngh:-.m, 
F. \V. Lougee, John T. Wright, Charles R. Bishop, Bernard 
Faymotiville. John H. Gardiner, W. H. Brown, Arthur \. 
Smith. "As usual," the Firemans Fund made money, and 
aa usual when the burgee was flying it made every one happy. 

• • • 

The News Letter first made public the fact that the 
Rochester German was to return to the Coast. The company 
will probably stay here awhile this time, as it has been taken 
into the office of Mr. T. J. Conroy, whose ability to control 
and select good business is proved by his 26 per cent loss 
ratio record of last year. The Rochester German was or- 
ganized in 1872, has about a million and a quarter assets, and 
a handsome surplus in the neighborhood of $600,000. 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



INSURANCE. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) 



OF LONDON. ENGLAND 



C- P. MTJLLrNS, Manager. 41G-H8 California street, 8. F. 
PIKE INStTRANOE 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital '. 11,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,081.895.13 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 2,092,661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN St. B0Y0, Sao Francisco agent, 111 California street. 

Bntish and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(Limited) OP LIVERPOOL 

Capital .-. I6,700.00u 

BALFOUB, 8UTHKLE & CO., Agents 316 California street. S. F 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of EBPUBT, GERMANY 
Capital, t2.26O.O0O Assets (10,984.248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO.. General Manage 

Paolflo Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street 8. P. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 8chleMlngor, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St, S. F 




Pa£*K GO**, OtrMITM«x1 



?/vna/i^> 



HSUKANCG COMPANY 

OF FT*KOePO*T 



G. H. WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sar. Francisco. Cal 

Phone. Main M*». 



Founded A. D. 1792 



nsurance 



L/ompany of / lorth /imer 



ica 



or mii.AnKi.riMA. parnt. 

Paid-up Capital tS.000.u00 

Surplus to Policy Holders to. 022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Dp. t3.446.100 Asset*. 124.662 048.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders. 18.930 431.41 Losses Paid Over, tl84.000.000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F- KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NevV Zealand Insurance Company 

OF New Zealand 
Capital, $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS. Manage) 
Hooker ft Lent. City Agents. 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manager 
219 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado lnsuramce. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Grose Assets. 913,687,833 

Surplus to Polioy-holdera. •7,631,926 
H. L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Franolsoo, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of 
General and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensur- 
ing prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the 
insuring public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and 
Payment op Losses 



WE 
PAY YOUR 

losses 



THE AMERICAN CREDIT- 
INDEMNITY GO. OF MEW YORK 

S. M. PHELAN, President. 
CREDIT INSURANCE ONLY 

The Leading Mercantile Houses of the United States 

™ endorse this system. 

Correspondence Solicited. A business producer and profit protector. 
GEORGE J. STERN8DORFF, 211 SANSOME STREET 

Pacffio Coast Agent Tel. Blaok 4434 SAN FRANCISCO 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 
Assets over 162,000.000. Liabilities $53,000,000, Surplus over $8,000,000 

Issues policies for all approved forms of Insurance; adapted to all stations 
and circumstances of life. Policies are free from restriction* as to travel 
and residence; are dear, concise business contraots. and conditions are 
plain and pimple and easily understood. 

Home office— New York City. Pacific Coast head office. Hayward 
Bnilding, California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisoo. 

Jonn R. Hegeman, President; Haley Fiske, Vice-President; Geo. B. 
■\y-oodward, Secretary; George H. Gaston, Seoond Vice-President; James 

Roberts, Assistant Secretary- 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 



2?/>e Mother in the Magdalen 

A Pen Sketch by Edmund Taylor. 
Have you read the "Confessions of an English Opium 
Eater?" And if so, do you recall the incident of the child 
De Quincy who ran away from school because he knew 
more Greek than his masters, and plunged alone and penni- 
less into the unpitying streets of London, there hoping to 
find the World for which he longed? He was very hungry 
and he would certainly have died had not a woman found 
and fed him — a strange woman whose paint and tinsel be- 
tokened neither vanity nor light-heartedness — who flitted at 
night like a shadow, the child knew not why or whither. 
Under her scanty cloak he slept, and her inadequate meals 
he shared, until one night she left him and was lost forever 
in the vortex of the city. 

********** 

Because it does not snow in San Francisco it does not 
follow that you never suffer from the cold. The drenching 
fog was blowing up the street, and the boy's teeth were chat- 
tering dismally as the woman pulled him into the shadow of 
a building and forced the neck of a bottle between his 
teeth. 

"Why don't you go home?" she asked as she slipped the 
bottle back into one of the pockets of her ridiculous raglan. 

"Home! I guess not," said the street elf, dodging away 
from a drip from above. 

"Got any folks?" enquired the woman, with the air of a 
prosecuting attorney. 

"Yes — the old man — that's the trouble!" 

"Beats you, I suppose — pounds you within an inch of your 
life." 

The boy answered with a pale little nod. 

"Beats you because you are small and weak, that's why 
they ill-treat you, because you are small and weak," she whis- 
pered with the first show of emotion. "Hungry, I suppose?" 

Again the street-elf nodded from his corner in the dark. 

The woman drew her ridiculous raglan closer about her. 
Her feathers were drooping in the moist fog. 

********** 

"Frank's Coffee Parlor" was doing a large business when 
the woman entered, for midnight is noon on upper Kearny 
street. Here they serve sweet cakes and doughnuts together 
with enormous cups of coffee for a consideration of five 
cents to drunken sailors or still more drunken soldiers or 
the sodden hangers-on of the quarter. The woman would 
have brought the boy to the comparative warmth and com- 
fort of the place, but you cannot feed two for five cents 
even at "Frank's Coffee Parlor." Her last remaining coin 
was exchanged for a large paper bag of something warm, 
and as the' door closed behind her a soldier from within re- 
marked to his companion across the table, "She spends her 
money like she had it to burn." 

********** 

The paper bag was empty, and the boy was asleep with 
the ridiculous raglan of the woman wrapped about him. 
The fog had lifted a bit when the woman stood a moment 
over the boy and looked warily up and down the street. 
The heavy tread of a patrolman sounded sharply on the 
paving stones nearby. The woman shrank deeper into the 
shadow until the sounds were past. The boy still slept. The 
woman leaned a moment over the boy, then touched her 
lips lightly to his pale little forehead. "Mamma," said the 
sleeping child, as he patted her cheek with a dirty hand. 

The woman arose and stole away down the awakening 
street. She was shivering now, for her coat was gone and 
her garments were pitifully thin. Along Clay street she 
hurried, almost ran. She could hear the early morning drays 
rumbling over the cobbles. Before her was the water-front 
— the bay — the bay and forgetfulness! 

********** 

"Hank," said the old boatman, as the black wagon rum- 
bled away and the crowd was dispersing from the pier — 
"Hank, I've got a wife and I'm a family man, and I sup- 
ports 'em honest, an' that maybe was why I was sorry-like 
when I seen 'em pull that woman out of the water. She 
hadn't hardly any clothin' on, and the weather ain't mild." 

"If it hadn't a-been the water it might a-been the cold," 
he said, to himself, as he climbed down into his boat and 
pulled reflectively out into the flat grey freshness of the bay. 



The United States Circuit Court is now considering the 
testimony submitted by United States Commissioner Hea- 
cock in the case of Mr. J. E. Doolittle vs. the Gold Runs 
Gravel Company, an English mining concern. Mr. Doolittle 
is suing them for J10.000, two years' salary, which they re- 
fuse to pay on the ground that damaging openings were made 
in a dam of which the plaintiff, as Superintendent, had 
charge. Mr. Doolittle claims that the company has a grudge 
against him for refusing to "stand in" and help the princi- 
pal stockholders freeze out some of the smaller ones. All 
the testimony submitted has been decidedly in Mr. Doolittle's 
favor, and there is no doubt among those familiar with the 
case that a decision will be given for him. 



There was an interesting case in Judge Cabannis' Court 
Saturday, in which the Commercial Fire Despatch Co. was 
the plaintiff and Mr. John Loyd the defendant. Mr. Loyd 
was an employee of the Commercial up to last September, 
when he went to work for the San Francisco Fire Despatch. 
His success with them was such that his former employers 
tried to re-engage him. Failing in this they brought charges 
against him. The case was tried in Judge Cabannis' Court 
Saturday, with the result that Mr. Loyd was triumphantly 
acquitted, the Judge completely exonerating him. He was 
ably defended by Mr. Samuel M. Shortridge. 



The Old Humpbacks 
Are not to be compared to our new patent back, flat-opening 
Blank Books, which cost no more than the old style and are 
infinitely better. Daily Journals, Calendars. Diaries and 
Calendar Pads for 1902 at the right prices. Sanborn, Vail 
& Co., 741 Market street. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 
Dentlit, 806 Market. Specialty. " Colton Gas" lor painless* teeth extracting 



They know you are a judge of good whiskey when you call 

for Jesse Moore at the bar. 

Amercian Dispensary. 514 Pine street, above Kearney 




* 




American Emergency 
Food Company.... 

jt jt jt, 207 BATTERY ST. 

This company m a nu fact u res the.... 

"DEANE PATENT FOOD TUBE" 

AN EMERGENCY RATION 

The tube welsrhs 3% ounces and oonlalns a meal in Its regular oourse* when 
cooked. 

A man can curry 1 month's provisions In a package weighing 12 primula. 

Will keep in any climate under all injurious conditions, and « ill not de- 
teriorate with flirt.-. 



January 25. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.1 



THE LATEST DISCOVERV. 

A new process of pris. rviiiR nn.l packing fool h»» 
Inrentid ami patent.-,] by ■ to It will 

cause of many changes. Tasks that 

I Improbable will now be made possible. With 
th.- North Pole may be discovered, arid navigation 
assisted, and the strategic movements of an army thai 
It will be revolutionized. Surveying, exploring, pros] 
and camping expeditions will greatly appreciate this 
tlon. 

It Is a tube containing a square meal prepared, preserved, 
mod, and ready to eat after a few moments' rooking. 
It will keep in any climate or condition, and will nol deter- 
iorate with age. 

The discovery of this has been for years attempted, but 
until now it has been a failure. The German and (Trend) 
scientists have worked at it under the direction of their 
respective war departments. The outcome always was that 
a sausage or mush was the result. The food was in a con- 
centrated form, and tasted like nothing the man was ac- 
customed to eat. Consequently his stomach rebelled. 

This food tube contains a meal in its regular courses, 
and is exactly, when cooked, what the person is in the habit 
of eating at home. Any article of food can be prepared in 
these tubes. The elements necessary to support the human 
system have been carefully worked out, and two of these 
tubes contain the proper amount of carbo hydratPs, fats and 
proteids to nourish a man under great physical exertion for 
twenty-four hours. 

That would be six ounces of weight to carry for one day. 
Eleven and one-quarter pounds would be the weight a soldier 
or explorer would have to carry for one month's provisions. 
A representative of the News Letter made up a party of 
seven, including the inventor, at a dinner. Seven tubes 
were all that were utilized. They selected the tubes contain- 
ing the following ingredients: 

Two of fish, rice and tea; two of beef stew, corn, and 
coffee; three of turkey, potatoes, and cocoa. All assisted in 
the cooking, and at the end of fifteen minutes the dinner was 
served in courses. 

All were served bountifully, and at the close of the meal 
each person, both from a filling and appetizing standpoint, 
was perfectly satisfied. Enough was carried from the table 
to satisfy two extra persons. 



A HOUSEHOLD NECESSITY. 

A bath for a cent is about as cheap as anyone could ask; 
yet that is the price for which this luxury is provided by 
the Nonpareil Instantaneous Water Heater, one of the most 
notable household inventions of recent years. There is 
almost no limit to its utility, and it is coming into general 
use in hospitals, doctors' and dentists' offices, and in private 
houses. Some of the best residences in San Francisco 
are now equipped with Nonpareil Water Heaters, and they 
are giving universal satisfaction. 

One of the greatest recommendations of the Nonpareil 
is the quickness with which it will heat 'water, and for this 
reason it is especially convenient in the bathroom. Even 
where there is a hot-water tank connected with the stove 
the supply of hot water is often inadequate for all purposes. 
With a Nonpareil Instantaneous Water Heater in the bath- 
room all this inconvenience is obviated. It is simply a 
matter of lighting the gas, and in less than a minute boiling 
water is flowing. This seems almost miraculous, but it is 
a fact. The uses to which such a heater may be put can 
readily be seen. Often sudden sickness or other emergen- 
cies arise in the middle of the night which make a liberal 
supply of hot water imperatively necessary. With the Non- 
pareil it can be supplied instantly, at a cost too small to be 
considered. The Nonpareil Manufacturing Company, which 
is located at 322 Post street, will have on exhibition next 
week a large stock of heaters of all descriptions and sizes. 



A Good Milk 
for infant feeding is a mixed Cow's milk, from herds of native 
breeds. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk herds are prop- 
erly housed, scientifically fed, and are constantly under 
trained inspection. Avoid unknown brands. 



If you will watch the Sun- 
day papers for our special 
sales each week of drugs, 
medicines, toilet articles, 
you can save considerably 
over our regular cut rates. 
Telephone orders delivered 
at once. South 356. 

&f>e Owl Drug Co. 

1128 MARKET ST., S. F. 
BROADWAY 4 10TH ST.. OAKLAND. 



Geo. li. Fuller Desk Co. 

REMOVAL SALE 



We offer our im- 
mense stock of OFFICE 
FURNITURE at greatly 
reduced prices until 
February 1st. 

638-640 HISSION ST. 




Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



CAFF RflYAI Cor. Fourth and Market streets, San Francisco. Try our 
iiuihl special brew steam and lager beer, 5 cents. Overcoats and 
valises ohecked free. 

WANTED— Piano Pupils. Teacher of Stuttgart system. Residence or 
home. J1.00 an hour. Miss Beodt, 1623c Howard. Piano ior sale cheap. 

English, English Literature, and 'Elocution. 108% Hayes Street. Ooacb- 
Inir done. Children's olasses on Saturday. Adults of neglected education 
a specialty. Prices reasonable. Hours 9 to 4. 

Removal Notice. 

The offices of the CALIFORNIA COflMHRClAL QUAR^ 

ANTY CO. have been removed from the Chronicle Building to 
164 CROCKER BUILDING, 9TH FLOOR. 

Bills, notes or accounts sent for collection will receive prompt at- 
tention, as heretofore. All collections remitted in full within 24 
hours after receipt. Respectfully, 

184 Crocker Bldg., City. Cal. Commercial Guaranty Co. 

EN THE SUPERIOR COURT OP THE City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. 

JAMES M. P. DAVIS, Plaintiff, vs. NETTIE DAVIS, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court, City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California, and the complaint filed in said City and County of San 
Francisco, in the office of the Clerk of said Superior Court. 

The People of the State of California send greeting to Nettle Davis, de- 
fendant. 

You are hereby directed to apppar and answer the complaint in art action 
entitled as above, brought against you In the Superior Court. City and 
County of San Pranolsoo, State of California, within ten days after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within this County; or within 
thirty days if served elsewhere. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you so appear and answer, the 
said plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
plaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of said Superior Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California, this seventeenth day of Aug- 
ust, 1901. WM. A. DRANE, Clerk. 

(Seal.) By E. M. THOMPSON, Deputy Clerk. 

NOTICE. 

The nature of the cause of action set forth in and the relief demanded by 
the above mentioned complaint are as follows: 

The action Is brought to secure a divorce from defendant on the ground 
oflthe willful desertion by the defendant of plaintiff: and the relief sought 
Is the dissolution of the bonds of matrimony now holding together plaintiff 
anddefendant. 

PETER T. RILEY and J. F, RILEY Attorneys for plaintiff, 416 Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco. Cal. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 




MOTHER CAREY'S CHICKENS. 
(E. Carl Litsey. In the Ch .utiumim.) 
When the drift spins white, and the winds are high. 
And the black clouds race in the sullen sky. 
Then Mother Carey, down in the sea, 
Startles her chickens up from her knee, 
With shout and laughter she bids them fly. 

"Oh, the white foam gleams and the wave heads sing. 

So up, my pretty ones, strong of wing. 

There's many a good ship out to-night. 

Sheeted with spray and blind with fright; 

So follow them close, till the thing is done. 

And bring me the dead hearts one by one." 

For this is her way when the giant sea 
Rages, stark mad, and the stunned ships flee; 

She sends her chickens, strong of flight, 

Out of the sea and into the night, 
To guide dead mariners down to her knee. 

They say that her song has a magic ring 

To sailormen, weary of journeying; 

That brave eyes close in a lotus sleep — 
All's well! and never a watch to keep; 

And the Joy of Life seems a little thing 

When they follow the flash of the dipping wing. 

Their brisk sea voices will lift no more 

When the anchor is catted for some strange shore. 
Heartache is done and tears are past, 
And the red weeds cling to the broken mast. 

And never a lean back springs to the oar. 

They say that these swift, brown birds, that flee 
And skim in our wake, when the wind is free, 
Are the souls of mariners drowned in the sea — 
That they guide dead comrades down, far down, 
To the swaying streets of a coral town, 
Where the Mother sits in her tide-spun gown. 



SONG. 

(Marie Van Vorst, In Scjibner'jO 

In among the tall weeds 

There lives a briar-rose, 
Ail among the rugged reeds 

She bends and .sways and glows. 
The ragged bloom around her grows, 

And rough and rude her bed, 
But kisses of the wind she knows 

And blushes warm and red. 

The sunny moor about her lies, 

The stream runs blithe and clear. 
She does not reck o' sombre skies. 

Nor knows the changing year. 
She hath no ken o' Winter dread. 

Nor dreads the frost and storm. 
For Summer winds have called her dear, 

She blushes, red and warm. 



THE SPHINX. 

(Theodore Roberts, in Independent.) 

Forever it has stood, forever mute; 

Gazing with sightless eyes into the Past; 

Its seamed face, of piled-up years the fruit. 

Turned to the mysterious desert vast. 
Wisdom inscrutable upon its brow, 

And knowledge of dead years sits on its face; 
For of the lifeless Past — the living Now 

It is, and centuries have given place 
To others, since the Pharoas' cunning hand 

Upreared this aged Sentry of the Nile! 
While century-waves are breaking on Time's strand 

It stays, upon its carven face a smile. 
Mocking all human-kind; a voiceless sage; 

Knowing all things, yet dumb, from age to age! 



San Francisco Savings Union 

582 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits July I. 1901... S28.97S.640 Reserve Fund 1226.99 

Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 Contingent Fund 145.617 



E. B. PO ND, Pr esident 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



W. C. B. DeFBEMERY, Vice-President 
R. M . WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Directors— Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee. W. O. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller. Bobert Watt. George O. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Earth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real eBtate, and larms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
o«tw only 6:80 10 8 o'clock. 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET. 

Directors— Adolph O. Weber. President: W. J. Lowry, Vice-President; 
W. S. Seres; I. Kohn: G. H. Luohalncer. 
A. D. Keyes and C. E. Hatch, Attorneys; Ernest Brand, Secretary. 



A NEWSPAPER NOTE 

OAKLAND'S 



The 
Tribune 



GREAT 

EVENING 

NEWSPAPER 



|«2 managed, for San 

13 Francisco advertising business, 
by F. R Porter, whom 
consult; tariff inviting. 
9 Powell street, Columbia 
Theatre Building, San 
Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
ESTATE OF Gil ES S. BROWN, also knoivu as G. 9. BROWN. De- 
ceased- 
Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned. GEORGIE BROWN. Execu- 
trix of the last will and testament of Di ceased, to the creditors of. and all 
persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necessiry vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said QEORGIE BROWN. Executrix, at the office of J. F. 
RILEY. Attorney-at-I.aw. Rooms 65 lo58. -116 t Blifornia street. San Fran- 
cisco. California, the same being her place for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco. State of 
California. _ 

GEORQIE BROWN, 
Executrix of the last will and testament of GILES S. BROWN, also 

known as G. 8. BROWN, Deceased. 
Dated at San Francisco. December 23. 1901. 

J. F. RILEY, 
Attorney for Executrix, 4IC California street. Rooms 55-58. 



Gray Bros. 



Hay ward Bide. California mid Montgomery 

streets, San Francisco. 

205 New High Street. I^oa Aneeles 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 




ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 



423 Post street, between Powell and Ma.-on. 
Sau Franolsoo. Telephone No. 1323 



W. K. Br1d*«. i-ropHflor. 



BLAKE, M0FFIT & T0WNE 



Blake. Mofflt A Towne Los Angeles. 
Blake. MoFall 4 Ce. Por"and Or 



Telephone Main 199. 

DEALERS IN PAPER 

6-57-69-61 First street S. F 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN II^&rS." Sf"^. 

Mexican remedy. Glvea health and strength to the sexual organs. 
Depot at 323 Market St., San Francisco. Sena for clrcula»" 

Pacific Towel Company no. 9 lick pi.,.-.- 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels $1 per month; 12 hand or 
roller towels 81-50 per month. Tel. Main 1780. 



January 25. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



2J 



BANKING. 



London and E^nFrjneheo Bank - Wells Fargo 6c Company Bank 



1M ('AI.IPiiKNM KTRKRT. 

BBAJD QWriQM 71 Lombard *um>i. Immlon 

Capital Authorised, to."-- Capital PfeJd IV tl.400.OOD. 

Director* — Henry t*o#chen. (Imirmmi. London! « hrl-iUn do ouigne. 
San Frandaco: ChariM Hemcry. London: John L. Howard, Ban Kran- 

eteeo; Randfx Koppel. Ix»ndnn : (irovillo H*»n»loy Palmer. London; NorUHl 
D. Hideout. Sao Franciaoo; Arthur .Scrivener. , <rindoQ. 

Inspector of Branchoa. Otiotav Pr1eder(r v 

AgenU In New York. Maasra. J. P. Morcnn A Co. 

MKASCHBS: Portland. Oregon: Tncoma. Wwli.. Seattle. Wmh- 

letter* ol credit t«iiued avallnhlr lor traveler* mid the purchase of mer- 
chandise In any city ol the world Deal In foreign and dome-tie exchn nge 
Account* of country bantu received. Term* on application. 



A. L. Black, Caahler 



W. MiCKlSTo-ti. Manager 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which U amalgamated The Bank ol British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 18.000.000. Reserve Fund. 12,000.000. 

Aggregate Resources over $&>,000.000- 

Hon- Geo. A. Cox. President; B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

J. II. I'luuitiier. Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— fin Lombard St.. E- C. S. Cameron Alexander, Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 

Agenta. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson. While Horse; British Columbia: Attfn. Oranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood. Kara loops. Nanalnio. Nelson, New Westminster, Sand on, 
Vancouver. Victoria. In the United States — New York, N. Y. San Fran- 
clsco. Cat- Seattle. Wash. Portland, Ore* Skagway, Alaska- 
Bankers in Ixmdon — The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Banker* in New York — The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agent* In Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franolsoo Office : Walter Powell, Manager. A. Ruins. Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansome and Sctter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital t3.500.000 Paid-Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, fl .000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N.Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres A Cie. 17 

Boulevard PolBsonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. Manager. 
R. ALTSCHTJL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts.. San Francisco 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pibhch Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $500,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 5130.000. 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson. Win. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson. Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Plerue, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphla-Drexel <k Co.: Chicago-Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City-First National Bank. London-' 
Brown. Shipley A Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tbubt deposits and SAVINGS. Investments carefully selected 
lor our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A- Frederick, Vice-President; H. 
Branner, Cashier ..«--. ™ 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenbere. W. A. Frederick, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A. Denlofce, A. G. Wleland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred O. Siebe 
John Rapp. ____ 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Stb. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,600,000 

Subsoribed 3.000.000 Reserve Fund... 700.000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STELNHART, P. N. LELTENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomeht St Mills Building. 



Interest paid on deposits. 



W 1111am Alvord 
William Baboook 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 

S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 

W. S. Jones 



H. H, Hewlett 
E. J, McCutchen 
R. H, Pease 



President 
Manager 
<««h(er . 
v--r. lUIIIRR . 
'2nd. Aunt, <a*hler. 



Joan J. Vai.rmti!**. 
ll"*»n 8. Kin, . 
H. WANWom 

P. I.. I.IPMA.f. 
II. K Mll.l.KH 



NMNnf&S&fi . 

I PORTl.ASit, Or.. 



Man Frn 
. . .San I 

Han Ptanctecn 

Man Prai 

San Franolsoo 

II. B. I'AKMONfc, f'aahler 
. .1. B, Doolt, OaahUi 
- It. Lka Harmf-m, <V«hlc 



Statement of Condition at Close of Business, July 31, 1901. 
ASSETS 

Loana. $IO,<W2.400.fil 

Bond*. Stockn aikI Warrants 2.1P1 727 In 

Real Estate nm I.G6>V03n'77 

Mlfcellnncniis Assets ' 12 4ISJWJ 

Due from Bnnkn and Banker*.... 1.I04..>M.12 

C* 8 " 3,073,676.04 



$19.IW9,56H.17 
LIABILITIES 

Capiltil $ 600.000.00 

surplus. 5.750.000.00 

Undivided Profits 3,311,290 2« 

Deposits. Banks and Bankers 1,184,166,27 

" Individual S.!KM.lo2!62 



$19,&89.&5ft.l7 
General hanking bij»ineen In all Us branches. Correspondents throughout 
the World- Accounts received on favorable terms. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, $2,000.00(1. 

Surplus, $1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits, January 1, 1902, $2,889,340.65. 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vice-Pres*t I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. OIAY Secretary I SAM H.DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild &. Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and Eatt Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit issued, available in all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 626 CALTFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,316,331.43 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits December 31. 1901 30.766.088.17 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann, Ign, StHohart, II. B. Rusb, Emil Rohte, N Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. * 

Cashier, A. H. R. Sehmldt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attor 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $800,000 

James D. Phelah, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

Gbobgb A. Stoet, Cashier John A. Hoopbb, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 

Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M, 

McDonald, Charles Hoi brook: 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 

city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. $12,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..$250,000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit account* bearing interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, General Manager 

Crocker- Wool Worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Cobnub Mabkkt. Montgombby aht> Post Sts. 

Pald-un-CapItal Jl.000 000 

Wm. H. Orookbb. President Gyo. W. Klihb, Cashier 

O.E. Gbbbn. Vice-President W. Gebgb, Jb.. Assistant Oasnle 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, B. B Pond. Georee Crocker. O. E. Green, G. W 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W, Scott 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 



OBITUARY. 

Gustav Friederich, for the past thirty years connected 
with the London and San Fraueisco Bank, died at the Wal- 
deck Sanitarium recently after an illness of nearly five weeks. 
Mr. Friederich came here from London thirty years ago, and 
entered the office of the bank mentioned. He worked himself 
up to the position of acting manager, a position he held 
for several years. Three years ago he was made general 
inspector of the branches of the system. 

The deceased was a member of the Pacific Union Club, and 
had a large circle of acquaintances. He left a married daugh- 
ter, Mrs. William Hoelschu. of San Francisco, two single 
daughters, Miss Beatrice and Marguerite Freiderich, who are 
in Germany, and a son, Mr. Alfred Friederich, who is 
in the Portland office of the London and San Francisco Bank. 

Richard Hellman, a San Francisco pioneer, died at his 
Pacific street residence in this city Monday, at the age of 
nearly eighty-one years. Mr. Hellman was one of the oldest 
commission merchants in San Francisco, and had a very suc- 
cessful business career. He made a legion of friends, who 
respected and honored him for his upright character and 
business integrity. He left five sons, Messrs. Horatio G., 
Anthony C, Frederick, Richard B., and George H. Hellman. 
He was a native of England. 

Sydney M. Smith, the well-known San Francisco capital- 
ist, died at San Jose Wednesday of heart failure. He had 
gone there on a business visit, and died a few minutes after 
leaving the train. Sydney M. Smith was born in Boston in 
1S12, and came to California when a youth. He went into 
a business office, and gained steady promotion. At the time 
of his death, he was a director and stockholder in many 
corporations, and had amassed a large fortune. He left a 
wife and three daughters — Mrs. Lonsdale, widow of Lieu- 
tenant Lonsdale, who lost his life in the Samoan trouble in 
1899; Miss Helen E. Smith, and Miss Bertha Smith. He was 
a prominent member of the Bohemian Club. 

Edward D. Feusier died in this city Tuesday. He was a 
native of Brooklyn, New York, and at the time of his death 
was 66 years of age. Mr. Feusier was an old and respected 
citizen of San Francisco, and is mourned by hosts of friends. 
He left a widow, Mrs. Philomene Feusier, and a son. Mr. H. 
E. C. Feusier. A brother of the deceased, Mr. Louis Feusier. 
lives in Stockton. 

The Goodyear Rubber Company closed its store part of 
last Saturday out of respect to the memory of Mrs. J. A. 
Minott, widow of the late J. A. Minott, who was treasurer of 
the Goodyear Rubber Company for a great many years. 



ANOTHER FRATERNAL GONE. 



Raphael Weill & Co. are having plans drawn for an ad- 
ditional two stones to their already commodious store, the 
White House, at the corner of Post and Kearny streets. Mr. 
Albeit Pissis, the architect, has the plans in charge. The 
management reports that the work of improvement will be 
begun immediately. 



Walter Baker & Co. have issued a very attractive little 
booklet under the title of "La Belle Chocolatiere and the 
Children." It contains reproductions of a number of exceed- 
ingly clever posters made by children to advertise the merits 
of Baker & Co.'s chocolates. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets All druereists refund Lhe money if 
it falls to cure. E. W- Grove's siguaLure la on each box. Price 25 cents 



The San Francisco Art Association has issued a very art- 
istic announcement of the coming Mardi Gras ball to be 
held at the Hopkins Art Institute on February 11th. The 
cover is of a rich design in harmonious colors. 



The Best Fountain Pens. 
We are selling agents for the "Waterman Ideal Fountain 
Pens," $2.50 to $10 each, and sole agents for the "Marshall." 
best $1 fountain pen in the world. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 
741 Market street. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, BIO Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country. Tel. Main 1042. 



The Protected Knights of America has gone. Its existence 
was brief. It was born in the spring of 1899, and at one 
time numbered about 8,000 Knights. Now its unpaid death 
claims, some $20,000 to $25,000, are the largest figures it 
has. In fact, is all it has, except a receiver and a bad 
memory. Its supreme protector in his swan song letter to 
the order, says: "We have issued since the order was char- 
tered 7,800 benefit certificates. We have had 50 death losses. 
Had our entire membership paid their assessments and kept 
up their membership, our order to-day would stand upon 
high ground, with a competent reserve fund; but alas, it 
is a fact borne out by the records, that more than 50 per 
cent of the membership lapsed before the deputy received 
his full compensation, and did not pay one cent into the 
supreme treasury for the mortuary fund. In the months of 
November, December and January last our mortality was 
appalling. We honestly applied every dollar of the income 
to the payment of losses and demands, but it was wholly 
insufficient to meet them. We worked and hoped to increase 
our income by increasing our membership. Our inability 
to promptly meet our losses made our order a target for ene- 
mies, and we were cruelly taunted and scourged by them. 
The confidence of our members was broken down, chapter 
after chapter became suspended, until we found our member- 
ship less than 2,000, with a death loss of $25,000 confronting 
us." This is the regulation whimper, assigning any reason 
for the failure but the correct one — the absurdity of the 
fraternal low-rate system of insurance. Then the S. P. goes 
on and offers to "do" the Knights again by placing them 
free of cost in the American Guild, which, according to the 
circular is about on the same plan as the Knights. A nickel 
in the slot machine is quicker in its returns and just about 
as sure in its results as schemes of this kind. 



CHECKED. 

The unprofessional ignorance of Mayor Schmitz and the 
professional craft of Abe Reuff were inadequate to oust 
County Clerk Mahoney, as the events of the argument before 
Judge Hebbard showed Thursday. The cocksureness of the 
new Warwick in the courtroom with a pile of law books as 
high as the Nevada Block on the table before him would have 
been sufficient to influence a less determined man than Judge 
Hebbard, but the latter never gave an inch, as his words in 
closing the case plainly showed. 

"Under these decisions I have no hesitation in declaring 
that the Mayor — a city officer — has no authority over the 
County Clerk — a county officer. He cannot suspend or re- 
move him. Beyond these points I have mentioned the city 
has no jurisdiction over any county officer, and te Mayor has 
has no authority over any county officer, and the Mayor has 
no authority to suspend him. He has no more to do with 
them than have you, Mr. Reuf." 

The fact of the case is that the Schmitz-Reuf cabal to get 
Mr. Mahoney out of office was based on an offense which 
is very common among successful politicians and of which 
Mayor Schmitz is as guilty as the accused County Clerk — 
the offense of making ante-election promises with no inten- 
tion of keeping the same. A man more conversant with his 
duties than Mayor Schmitz would never have tried to oust 
Mr. Mahoney on the grounds he did. 



A car load of locomobiles consisting of long distance 
journey cars and some very smart family traps will reach 
the city Monday, January 27th. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
order from any coal dealer. 




©£&& u^//v. 






\ 



yiAiuirt: H»;r.\K-rt T ?i*:anr. 



LONDON ASSURANCE. 
OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Op 500,000 

Assets 2,502.050 



inuary 25, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



HUMAN NATURE. 
Chapter I. 

"Poor doggie:" 

The scene was City Hall Park, op- 
posite Brooklyn Bridge. 

It was a cold, crisp day in December. 
A small stray dog had gotten his left 
bind leg nipped by a passing car. 

"Poor doggie!" 

It hurt; and not being a dog of the 
mute variety, he howled. 

A gentleman In a silk hat and a sack 
coat held the poor puppy's head, while 
a fashionably attired lady poured 
cologne over the Injured paw. and bound 
it up in her point-lace handkerchief. 

"Poor doggie!" 

Another exquisitely gowned dame 
volunteered to convey the animal to 
a dog hospital and pay for his treat- 
ment. A gentleman in a handsome 
fur-lined overcoat contributed his silk 
muffler as a coverlet. A tall policeman 
tenderly carried the canine to the kind 
lady's landau, and she drove off amid 
the applause of the assembled multi- 
tude. 

"Poor doggie!" 

Everybody was in a friendly state, 
and staid men and women were appar- 
ently as foolishly happy as if they had 
been little children. 

Chapter II. 

"Mad dog!" 

The scene was City Hall Park, oppo- 
site the Brooklyn Bridge. 

It was a hot, sultry day in August. A 
small stray dog had gotten his left hind 
leg nipped by a passing car. 

"Mad dog!" 

It hurt, and. not being a dog of the 
mute variety, he howled. 

A gentleman in a silk hat and a sack 
coat agilely ran up a telegraph pole, 
while a fashionably attired lady jumped 
into a garbage barrel and sobbed con- 
vulsively into her point-lace bandker- 
chief. 

"Mad dog!" 

Another exquisitely gowned dame was 
seized with palpitation of the heart, 
and had to be conveyed to a hospital 
tor treatment. A gentleman in a hand- 
some duck suit contributed his cries 
to the confusion and vaulted into a 






cess 

gists the damp, 
keeps the leath- 
er soft and pi: 
able. Stitches 
do not 
No 

face to 
and cut. The 
harness not 
only keeps 
looking like 
new, but 
wi ars tw'ce 
as longlv, the l^fai 
use of Eureka 
Harness Oil. 



Sold 

everywhere 
in cans — 
all sizes. 

Made by- 
Standard Oil 
Company 



"\ VI 



ILwFnnlatkJ The leading musical in. 

H^l^""**-) ttitution of America. 

Conservatory Founded i8 S3 . unsur- 

OF MUSIC passed advantages in com- 

position, vocal and instrumental music, and elocution. 

George W. Ckadwick, Musical Director. • 
Pupils received at any time. For prospectus address 
FfcAHX W. HALS, Goner*! Manager, Boston, Maw. 



One word 

Macbeth — stands 

for everything good 
in lamp chimneys. 

My name on every one. 



If you'll send your address, I'll send you 
(he I dcx to Lamps and their Chimneys, to 
tell yuu what number t. < yet j'or your lamp. 
Macbeth, ritt>burt;h. 

passing coal-cart. After a heartbreak- 
ing chase a fat policeman cornered the 
suffering puppy in a doorway and 
pounded him to death amid the yells of 
the panic stricken multitude. 

"Mad dog!" 

Everybody was in a frenzied state, 
and staid men and women were ap- 
parently as foolishly frantic as if they 
had been little children. 
Chapter III. 

Medical science has long since estab- 
lished the fact that dogs are just as lia- 
ble to develop rabies in December as in 
Midsummer. What, however, is medi- 
cal science where human nature is con- 
cerned. Ah. what indeed! — W. S. Ad- 
kins, in Puck. 



SUNBEAMS. 

"What was the matter with your 
friend?" "Well," ei 
Stillwell. "I am y thai be 

got the wrong idea of vegetarianism. He 
Bformed thai corn belong! bo the 
vegetable kingdom, it occurred to him 

that his favorite whiskey was made 
from corn, and then he proceeded to 
draw his own conclusion. .." 

First Golfer — He doesn't play verj 
well, but he says he's too busy to give 
any more time to practice. Second 
Golfer — Oh. well, if a man neglects golf 
to attend to his business, what can you 
expect? 

Her Friend (in voluminous bathing 
suit) — Isn't your skirt a little — er — 
snug, and the skirt rather short for you. 
dear? The Widow (demurely) — Possi- 
bly; but it is the only one the bath- 
house keeper had that was black! 

Isaac (Just back from Europe) — I 

dropped a leetle at Monte Carlo 

Cohenstein — You did? Veil, you should 
know better as to go up against dot 
game! Isaacs — Oh, I choost vanted to 
know how it feels to lose money. 

Mrs. Wrencher — I suppose you have 
learned a great deal since your mar- 
riage. Mrs. John Newbird — Oh, yes, I 
have! I know now that it isn't at all 
practicable to send John off in the morn- 
ing with ice-cream in his lunch-basket. 

The Professor — Yes, a caterpillar is 
the most voracious living thing. In 
a month it will eat about six hundred 
times its own weight. Dear Mrs. Ernot 
—Whose boy did you say he was? 



"What I'm looking fur," said the old 
man. as he got off a train at the Union 
Depot, "is a lawyer who'll make a cer- 
tain young man in my town come up to 
the chalk line or go to jail." 

"What's a certain young man in your 
town been up to?" asked the special po- 
liceman who had been addressed. 

"Courtin' my daughter." 

"But that's no crime." 

"Engaged to her fur two years." 

"That's perfectly legal." 

"But the weadin' day was sot, and 
they should hev bin married last week," 
persisted the father. 

"Oh, I see! Then he's gone back on 
the girl?" 

"Gone dead back on her, sir, and it's 
a breach of promise case if I know any- 
thing about the law." 

"Unless he had good and sufficient 
reasons, you know." 

"He couldn't have had. Milly is one 
of the best girls in the world. No! She 
didn't give him no reason to flipflop." 

"And you didn't?" 

"Not a reason, sir. On the day be- 
fore they were to be married I sent 
fur Sam and asked him to lend me $500 
and take my note for three years. He 
sort of choked up over It and said 
he'd see about it, and that's the last 
anybody has seen of him. No, sir; I 
never gave him no reason fur throwin' 
my gal over, and you bet he'll either 
come up to the crack or play checkers 
with his nose as a warnin' to other fel- 
lers who don't know their own minds." 



IF YOU USE THE IWIfKUW fcU ' 

> HARTSHORN i 

'l shade Holler | y 



ROLLER 



Best 
Ever 






Why waste words, 
when two small ones 
describe the 




"So Placehunter has been appointed 
to office?" "Yes. He will now take 
a rest from the cares of office-seeking." 



SOLD 




ON 




1 EASY 




PAYMENTS 




By 




Benj Curtaz 


& Son 


SOLE AGENTS 




16 to 20 O'Farrell St 





26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 25, 1902. 



MERE GOSSIP. 



By Betsy Bird. 

The marriage of Miss Edith McBean and Dr. Kierstedt is 
not to occur for some time, as the young doctor is stationed 
up in the wilds of the State of Washington, and does not 
care to take his bride where there is so little gaiety. So 
meanwhile he will use all of his best endeavors to be trans- 
ferred to the Presidio, that his wife may be nearer her 
friends. 

Clara Huntington was a dream last Saturday at her tea 
in honor of her debutante cousin. Although the Huntingtons 
have endless wealth they always spend it in excellent taste, 
and even their jewels are well-chosen. Miss Huntington 
wore a darling gown of cream crepe de chine trimmed with 
beautiful lace. She had on a handsome white satin girdle, 
which was clasped in front with a miniature buckle as large 
as two silver dollars. She wore a pearl collarette, which took 
my eye. The Huntingtons introduced the Eastern fashion 
of serving refreshments — that is, they were to be had down 
stairs in the tea room. Mrs. Hearst was one of the promoters 
of the fad last winter in Washington, where I hear it 
created the same sort of an imbroglio it did last Saturday. 
Not every one knew where the goodies were, and many 
people left without getting anything to eat. 

Speaking of Mrs. Hearst reminds me that I met her out 
on Pacific Avenue last Friday calling, and she was superb 
in royal purple velvet. She has lived in Washington so 
long, where the matter of calling or not calling is of such 
infinite importance, that she is very punctillious about mak- 
ing all her duty visits. Mrs. Colton rather marred her 
first season in Washington by neglecting to pay her calls. 

Mrs. J. B. Stetson had a relapse last week after her severe 
illness from the grippe, and she just escaped death. For 
several days her life was despaired of, hut now she is better. 

Bare hands only are seen at the matinees now. This is 
for the reason that every woman wants the masculine priv- 
ilege of applauding. The Hopkins-Taylor set have a big 
party at every matinee, and make or unmake the players. 
They usually wear rich, dark frocks at the matinees, and re- 
serve their lighter gowns for visits and luncheons. 

The old O'Connor house on O'Farrell street has been sold, 
and now all these bachelor maids are flitting about follow- 
ing the bent of their own sweet wills. They are all going 
south presently to Coronado. 

One cannot but envy the bachelor maids with fortunes 
of their own. There are the Hagers, the Sullivans, and the 
O'Connors, all their own guardians with money enough to 
take them wherever they please. Georgia Sullivan is in New 
York studying music, and Ada Sullivan is abroad, to remain 
indefinitely. First she will go to see her brother, handsome 
Mr. Emmett Sullivan, who was educated abroad and is more 
at home on the Continent than in San Francisco. She is 
chaperoned by Mrs. Jack de Ruyter, who is an accomplished 
linguist, speaking both French and Italian. Mr. Jack de 
Ruyter went East to see his wife off. 

All the many friends of the Borels are calling upon them 
the Fridays of this month, for they have been so long away. 
Society is especially anxious to pay its respects to the hand- 
some Madame Louis Bovet, who is the first of the Borels to 
marry. Mr. Bovet is a young gentleman of good family who 
took up painting for his pleasure, and has enough a"bility to 
succeed if he is obliged to. Whether he will continue his 
artistic career now that he has the millionaire banker for 
a father-in-law remains to be seen. He is a distinguished 
looking man of military appearance and he has fierce foreign 
mustaches. The four Borel sisters have the pretty fad just 
at present of dressing exactly alike. On their reception days 
they have all been wearing soft white silk frocks, most sim- 
ply made, with fronts of lace and embroidery. The girdles 
are of white satin and clasp in front with white pearls. 
As one enters the Borel house, the effect is produced of 
being in the mirror maze, and you don't know which way to 
turn when you see a quartette of young ladles dressed exactly 
alike. 

The Kane and Gibbs families are very much distressed 
because young Frank Kane has been ordered to Pasadena by 
his physician. He has consumption. Mrs. George Gibbs is 
very fond of her nephew, who was a nice-looking fellow, 



with a splendid business career before him. He is the 
son of Captain Kane, retired, of the army. I hear Frank 
Kane was engaged to be married to a very charming young 
New York lady. The engagement has been on for some time 
in spite of the fact that when he was out here two years ago 
Mrs. Jules Brett, then Emily Schneely, made several big 
dents in his heart. A few months later Mrs. Schneely be- 
came Mrs. Brett, and Mr. Kane went back to his old love. 
The Bretts are in Japan, and they intend to make that land 
their home, for Mr. Brett finds there are excellent business 
opportunities in the country of the little brown men. 

A very sad story comes to me of the recently announced 
engagement of Miss Eloise Davis, the daughter of Dr. Davis, 
and Mr. Wallace Everett. The young people were about to 
be married five years ago, when Miss Davis met with a ser- 
ious accident that necessitated her lying in bed constantly. 
The family did all in their power to make the young girl 
forget her ailment. She had a portable telephone in her 
room, and when a luncheon was given at the houses of her 
friends they all telephoned her, told her funny stories, and 
sent her some of the dainty things and favors. Miss Eloise 
retained her cheerful spirits and forgot that she was an in- 
valid. Her sweetheart was ever faithful and loyal, and they 
always planned the happiness to come to her when she would 
be well. She learned all the modern languages, took up art, 
and wrote poetry. The poor girl imagines she is growing bet- 
ter, but instead, she is becoming steadily worse. To please 
her the engagement was announced, though all her friends 
and physicians believe she will never be any better; but 
she feeds upon the hope of marriage. 



If you are tired of your lunch place try the Grand 

Hotel Cafe, Fay & Foster, proprietors, where the best mer- 
cantile lunch in town is served from 11 to 2 daily. It is a 
resort of leading business and club men. 



There are many restaurants in San Francisco, but 

none that can approach Zinkand's in general excellence. 
It serves the best food, the best wines, and a fine orchestra 
plays every evening. 



(Formerly In Mills Knll.Hnir 



Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 

Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL HILL" 

Devotes Ue entire revenue to the embellishment of its arrounds. BurialB 
are continuing as heretofore- Plots and Graves for Sale, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perpetual care of same. Within 20 minutes of Kearny Street. 
Many street car lines pass the irate. 

Tel west es. Bush and Central Ave., San Francisco 

GEORGE GOODMAN 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Schilli tiger's Patent) in all its branches. Sidewalk 
and garden walk a specialty. 



Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, 



San t rdncisco 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, TS&Eggf&JP 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS, 1900. THE HIGHEST possible 

AWARD. These pens are "the best in the world." 

Sole agent for the United Sta< es. 

Me. Hekry Hoe, 91 John Street, New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 

|~> L_ ^-vf- For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billli tc 

|) f I J S rl v^S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, cannertt 
L -" *"* dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 

ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, t»<lers, etc. 

BUCHANAN BRUS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St., 8. F. Tel., 661 



rs <- t < ICK. 



k7 



Poor Trousers With 

Only One Leg 



(An Appeal to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Clothing.) 



All shapeless and limp is he lying 
Too feebla your pity to ' 

1 and lonely and living — 
Poor trousers with only one leg! 

Poor trousers, poor trousers, poor trousers! 

Too mangled a:\d Feeble to peg — 
The defli it member is Tomer's, 

Poor trousers with only one leg: 

Ah. where are the passions that swayed him 
In the halcyon days of his youth 

When straight from the Tailor who made him 
11- strode like a Monarch in truth? 

How silent he lies! Is he dreaming 
Of haunts of the Drave and the gay 

Where masculine toilets were gleaming 
At promenade, club and cafe? 

Ah: ere his deep fever-dream ceases 
Can aught be recalled of the hurt 

When he bent a proud knee out of creases 
Before an unpitying skirt? 

All gone is that exquisite passion, 
All gone is the glamour of yore — 

The beau that is passed by the fashion 
Is fit for the rag-bag — no more. 

And is there no home for the Failing 
No home for the Out-of-date Beau 

Where wounded, bedraggled and ailing 
The one-legged trousers may go? 

Nay, e'en though he's needing it vastly, 
None offer him crutches or peg, 

The cripple pathetic and ghastly — 
Poor trousers with only one leg! 

Poor trousers, poor trousers, poor trousers: 

Consider his feelings, I beg, 
This mock and this play-thing of Touser's — 

Poor trousers with only one leg! 
January 22, 1902. WALLACE IRWIN. 



Lovers of good wine will rejoice to hear that the new 

vintage of Mumm's Extra Dry Champagne, even more deli- 
cate in flavor than '93, and similar to '98, is now on the mar- 
ket. There were 120,359 cases of Mumm's imported in 
1901, nearly 60,000 cases more than any other. 



You will never wake up with a bad head if you drink 

J. F. Cutter Whiskey. It leaves no bad effects. Cutter 
cheers but does not inebriate. Mellowed by age, it pos- 
sesses that mellow, rich flavor so appreciated by connois- 
seurs. You will notice that discriminating drinkers always 
call for it. E. Martin & Co., 54 First street, sole agents for 
the United States. 



When your clothing becomes stained, spotted or baggy 

send it to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 
Stockton street. There they will be cleaned and pressed, and 
sent back looking like new. They also clean gloves, cravats, 
curtains, laces, tapestries and all such articles. Thorough- 
ness and promptness are their mottoes. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter journey across the continent. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



TIIK r«rjr c«nt«r ot iht> rllr. ronrcnlanl 1" 
•11 lh#> M| •l<.rr>* and ftH |>lft< r- aj i 

Kiirnpoan plan. It * il»» and upward*. 



2Jd street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite KadBM >*oiiar« Park) 
Flneat cafe In lhln city. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

Me w York City 

A Hlch i 'hi«- Exclusive Ilutel 
conduoted on the European 
plan at modernte rates. 
AccesBtbly and Delightfully located. 
W. Jounson Quinn. Proprietor. 

Mortimer M. Kelly, Manneer 




RIGGS HOUSE 

Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 

of tbe National Capital. First-class in all appointments. O. G 
Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

PARAISO HOT SPRINGS 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B, Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, lor 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



BALDWIN ANNEX 

CAFE AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

926-928-930 Market Street and 56 Ellis Street. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every delicatessen 

Domestic nnd Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone, Main 389. 

'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



There is one whiskey that always lives up to its reputation 

—and that is Jesse Moore. 



— Db. Sheadt, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento Street. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 18, 1902. 



leave] 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due fco arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

From December 6, 1901 



[arrive 



7:00 A Benlcla. Sulsun. Elralra, and Sacramento 6:55 P 

7:00 a Vacaville, Winters, Rumsey 7:55 P 

7:30 A Martinez. San Ramon, Valleio, Napa. Callstoea, Santa Rosa... 6: 5'P 

8:00 A Davta. Woodland, Knlehts Landfne, Marysvllle, OrovlUe 7:55 P 

8:00 a Atlantic Express. Osrden and East 8: 5 A 

8:00 a NileH. Lathrop, Stocteton _ 7:25 P 

8:00 a Niles. Mendota, Hanford. Vlsalla, PortervUle- 4:55 p 

8:30 A Shasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Sprints). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff, Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 a San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle, 

Marysvllle. Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:5 P 

8:30a Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne 4: 5 P 

9'iMi a HaywardB, Nlles, and way stations '11:55 a 

9:00 a Vallejo 1: 5 p 

9:00 a Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton. 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Angeles 7:55 A 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 A The Overland Limited— Offden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 5:5 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers f :00 p 

3:00 r Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento. Woodland, Knights Landing 

Marysvllle. Orovllle • 0:55 A 

3:30 p Hay wards, Niles, and way stations 7:55 p 

4:00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa 9:55 P 

4:00 p Niles. Llvermore, Stockton, Lodl 1; 5 p 

4S0f Hay wards, Niles, San Jose, Llvermore t8:55 A 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare. Bakersfteld, Saugus for 

5:00p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton 0:B A 

5:00 P Martinez, Antloch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno :5 p 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose 7:55 A 

T6:00p Vallejo ' i 

6:00 p Oriental Mall— Oeden, Denver, Omaha, St, Louis, Chicago... 4:5 P 
7:00 p Oregon and California ExpresB — Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
ding, Portland, Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p a n Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations : 5 A 

18:05 p Vallejo 7:55 p 

Coabt Division (Narrow Gauce). (Foot of Market St.) 

8 :15A Newark. Centervllle. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 P 

t2:15 p Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15P Newark, San Jose. Los Gatos t«:50 A 

09:30 p Hunters' Train— San Jobo and way stations J7:20 P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
A. m. 1 :00. 3 :00. 5: 15, p. m. 

From Oakcanp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. 18:00. f8:05. 10;00 A. m. 12:00, 
2:00. 4:00 p.m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 A San Jobo and way stations 6:40 A 

7:00 A San Jose and way stations tSKX) p 

/7:00 a New Almaden /4;10 P 

8:00 A Coast Line Limited— San ,To«e, Gilroy, Salinas. San Luis 
Obispo. Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and Principul i titernicli- 

ate stations 10:15 p 

9:00 A San Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, and principal intermediate stations 4:10p 

10:80 A San Jose and way stations S;.T> A 

11=80 a San Jose and wav stations 9:40 A 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood. MenloPark. Palo Alto, Santa Clara.San 
Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:ISA 

3:80 P San Jose and way stations 1 :30 P 

t4:15 P San Jose and principal way stations 5:30 p 

4:50 P Sunset Limited — Mondays, Wednenilays. Fridays, for Los An- 
neles, El Paso, New Orleans and New York. Arrives Sun- 
days. Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:15 A 

t5:00 p San Jose. Los Gatos, and principal way stations t9:00 a 

6:30 p San Jose and principal way stations 6:30 p 

6:80 p San Jose and way stations 7:30 p 

7:00 p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara. Lob 

Angeles, Demlne, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:30 A 

dll:45 p San Jobo and way stations 7:30p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 

I Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

The PACIFIC Transfer Oompant will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
Information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. M., fo r 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hlogo), \agnsiiki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, February 15, 1902 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 13, 1902 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) .. -Tuesday, April 8. 1902 

Dome (via Honolulu) Thursday, May 1. 1902 

Round Tnip oketb at Reduced Rateb. 

For freight r passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
Oorner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



CAL. N. W. RY. CO., Lessees S. F. and N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibuion Fekev — Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS-7:30.9:00. 11:00 a.m.: l2;35. 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 P.M. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11 :30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30. 11:00 a.m.; 1:30. 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 p.m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAYB-6:10, 7:50. 9:20. 11:10 a.m.; 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 P.M. 
SDNDAYS-8:10.9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.3:40 5:05.6:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and SchuetZen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Pranolsco 



In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 I Arriveat San Francisco 



Week days 
7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


Sundays 
8:00 ah 
9:30 am 
5:00 Pm 


7:30 am 




3:30 PM 


8:00 AM 



Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa Rosa 



Sundays I Week days 

10:40 am | 8:40 am 
6:05 Pm 10:;5 am 

7:35 PM | 6: PM 



Fulton, Windsor, 
Healdsbure, Lytton. 
I Geyservtlle, Cloverdale 



| 10:25 AM 
I 6:22 PM 



8:00 am 



Hopland, Uklah 



7:30 am 
3 : 30 Pm 
7:30 AM 
5: 10 Pm 
"7:30 am 



8,00 AH 



8:00 AM 

5:00 pm 



Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 



8:00 am 
5:00 Pm 



9:15 am 
6:06 pm 



Sebastopol 



10:40 AM 
7:36 PM 



10:35 AH 
6:22 PM 




SS "Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat.. Jan. 25, 2p,i 
8S "Sierra." for Australia. Thurs, Feb. 6, 10 a 1 
Line to Ooolsrardle, Australia, 
South Africa, 



and Capetown, 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO.. 
Agents, 643 Market Street Freleht Office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco, 




Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8>esmerB,eaTeBrDi > d w'yWh*rf 

San Francisco. 

For Ketchikan. Juneau, Treadwell's, Douglas City, 
Sknuway, etc., Alaska, 11 A.M.: Jan. 1, 6. 11, 16, 21. 26, 
31: Feb. 5. Change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C- and Pueet Sound Ports, 11 a. m. Jan. 
1. 6. 11. 10. 21.20. 31; Feb. 5. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:30 p. M, January 2. 
7. 12.17.22.27; Feb. 1. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Santa Barbara, Port 

Los Angeles and Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sun- 
days, 9 a. H. : steamer State of California." Wednesdays; 9 a. m. 

For Los Angeles, calling at Santa Cruz, Monterey, Han Simeon. Cayucos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Obispo) 'Gavlota, Santa Barbara. Ventura, 
Hueneme. East San Pedro. San Pedro, and *Newport. (*Bonitn only.) 

Steamer Bonita. * a. m.. Jan. 2, 10. 18, 26; Feb. 3. Steamer Coos Bay, 9 
a. m , Jan, 6, II, 22, 30; Feb. 7. 

For Mexican Ports. 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further information obtain folders. 

Rights reserved to change steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

COODALL, PERK INS & CO., Gen.Agts. 10 Marke t St.. San Francisco 

Going East, take the 

UNION PACIFIC 



"The OVERLAND ROUTE." carrying the 
United States OVERLAND MAIL. 

Three through trains EVERY DAY in the Year 



NO CHANCE to.... 

DENVER, KANSAS CITT 
OMAHA, CHICAGO 



'THE OVERLAND LIMITED' 



^Less than 3 days to Chicago, 4 days to New Vork 

I>aily Tourist "en-ice. Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions from San 
Francisco Wednesdays to Omaha. St. Paul and Chicago— WITHOUT 
('MANGE. Through lo Boston every Friday. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, Gen. Aot. U. P. R. R„ 

1 MOBTQOMBEV STREET. 8an FttANOtSCO. 

Chicago in less than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



AT 10 A. M. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Bullet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. in. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 




Strawberry Creek, Berkeley. With S. F. News Letter, February 1, 1902. 



Pnc« p«r Copy, 10 Cent*. 




Vol. LXIV. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1S&«. 



Annual Subscription, f4.00. 



(California ^Xucrtisjcr. 




SAN FRANCISCO. FEBRUARY 1. 1902. 



Number 5 



Fraudulent Examinations of the Chinese 



Now that the matter of Chinese Exclusion is prominently before Congress it might be well to 
look into some of the methods employed against the Chinese landing here, and to exploit a few of 
the abuses that exist in connection with ths examinations thsy must go through before it has been 
decided whether or not they are to become residents of the United States. 

Every Chinaman coming to San Francisco must satisfy the Collector of the Port that he is 
qualified to land-that he is a merchant, or that he is a bona fide resident of the United States, re- 
turning from China. If the Collector is not satisfied with his representations the Chinaman is taken 
before the United States Court, there to give reasons why he should not be sent back to China. 
The manner in which he is deprived of his rights will be a surprise to those unacquainted with the 
star chamber methods employed. 

When a boat lands on which there are Chinese it is at once boarded by a deputy of the 
Collector, accompanied by an interpreter. They see the Chinese in advance of anyone else. They 
proceed to pump each of them, and allow such as they please to land. If a dispute arises over the 
right of one of them to take up his residence here he is taken before the United States Court. 
There his evidence either is not taken, or if it is, receives no attention. The inspector who had the 
first interview with him on board ship tells, or pretends to tell, just as he pleases, what the China- 
man told him. On this testimony alone the case is decided. 

Suppose a Chinaman says that he is a merchant in Sacramento. That means a junketing 
trip for the inspector, who goes to Sacramento to satisfy himself that the Chinaman is a merchant 
there. Perhaps he finds his store, small and in squalid surroundings. His lordship makes up his 
mind that the Chinaman isn't enough of a merchant to count, comes back and makes a report to 
that effect, and the Mongolian is deported without a chance in the world to make any defense. His 
fate depends entirely upon what the inspector tells the Court. It is easy to see how an inspector 
might benefit himself, and the chances offered for wholesale fraud and bribery. 

Our Exclusion Law is foolish enough, unjust enough, and injurious enough to the State, with- 
out having abuses connected with it. If it will only be let die it will be well for California. The 
efforts now being made to pass a new law, stronger than the old, seem to be coming to grief. Our 
representatives have become over-zealous, and have made so much noise over their bill as to at- 
tract good, healthy opposition. There is a general awakening as to this Chinese Exclusion foolish- 
ness — a general realization that we have been laboring under a delusion. And thinking people are 
laughing at some of the utter absurdities of the exclusion law now in force. By its terms only 
Chinese merchants are allowed to come to this country. In China are some of the most learned 
men, some of the most profound scholars in the world. But they are not merchants; consequently 
we cannot receive them. Lawyers, doctors, scholars, professional men are barred from our shores. 

With all our boasted erudition on the subject we know very little of the real Chinese. Our ex- • 
perience has been with coolies. We have no knowledge of the Mandarin class, as far removed 
from the coolie class as a thoroughbred racer is removed from a mule. Their records in English 
and American colleges are such as any of our native born might be proud of. The Chinese Consul 
here, Mr. Ho Yow, was educated at the University of London, graduating with high honors. He 
studied law, and was admitted to practice in the English courts. One of his brothers was ad- 
mitted to the English Bar before he was twenty-four years old. 

Such Chinese should be welcomed here. They are desirable citizens. The coolies are not 
welcome as citizens, but as laborers. They do not wish to be citizens. They want to work, and 
we need their services. They do not cut wages, but they do faithful work and can always be de- 
pended upon. If the same could be said of the white men who do unskilled labor — who seek em- 
ployment on the ranches and in the orchards — there would be no need of the coolies 

In conclusion, an investigation should be made of the star chamber methods referred to in the 
matter of examining Chinese. They are at utter variance with the principles of right and justice. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 



The San Francisco News Lettee is printed and published every Saturday 
by the proprietor, FREDERICK MAkRIOTT, 6% Kearny St., San Francisco 

Entered at San Francisco Postofflce as second-claes matter. 

The office of the S. F. NEWS LETTER in London, Eng., is at 80 Cornhili 
E. 0., London, England, (George Street & Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 

New York Representative— Oscar Ironmonger. 116 Nassau Street. New 

York. 

Boston Representative — W. H. Daggett, 36 Broomfield Street. Boston. 



DECLINE OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

The House of Representatives at Washington is rapidly 
falling from its high estate. It has pretty nearly descended 
to the status of the House of Lords in England, whereas the 
Senate is initiative and vigor of action is more akin to the 
House of Commons. The leaders of our House of Represen- 
tatives appear in the curious attitude of persons bent upon 
the destruction of their own importance. Absolute power 
over the presentation, discussion and amendment of meas- 
ures has been given to the Speaker and a committee on rules, 
and this coterie of less than half a dozen men entirely 
dominate all proceedings. It decides what shall be consid- 
ered, and for how long, and by whom, and the precise course 
of any measure is determined in advance. Deliberation un- 
der this method of procedure, of course, becomes out of the 
question, and discussion sinks to the level of mere mechani- 
cal utterance in so far as its effect upon the House is con- 
cerned. Accordingly even discussion is discouraged, and the 
most important measures are now regularly whipped through 
in double-quick time. The Nicaragua Canal Bill and the 
Philippine Tariff Bill, measures of vast public importance, 
were pushed through within three days. Deliberation left 
the House entirely in both cases, and debate was reduced 
to a farce. Everything was hurried off to the Senate to 
be there digested in a manner worthy of their importance. 
Such a deliberate self-defacement of a great legislative body 
is without a parallel in history. It is the Senate, sometimes 
called "the millionaire's club," which now deliberates and 
legislates, and the country recognizes the fact, whilst the 
House concedes it. It has become the one branch of Con- 
gress which now regularly determines the course and char- 
acter of our legislation. No issue is now ever joined 
with it, and no fight ever made against it. It will decide the 
route of the Isthmian Canal. It will determine whether full 
tariff or half tariff or no tariff at all shall prevail against 
Philippine imports. The ..louse, as it is now going, might as 
well for all practical purposes be adjourned indefinitely. 
Yet the House, by the nature of its constitution, is the only 
representative body. It is all there is of real democracy 
in our Government. The fate that has now well-nigh over- 
taken it is a singular one in so great a Republic, and well 
worthy the study of the political philosopher. 



GOOD FOR HAWAII! 



President Roosevelt seems to know a thing or two about 
Hawaii. By one stroke of his pen he has done more to pacify 
and satisfy the islands than has been done during the 
whole time they have been in our possession. He has 
asked for the resignation of Mr. Sanford B. Dole as Governor 
and has determined to appoint Colonel Samuel Parker in his 
place. It is all the difference between a Governor hated 
by everybody, except a small missionary clique, and a 
Governor beloved by all races and conditions of men in 
our beautiful gem of the Pacific. Mr. Dole for the past three 
years has been perhaps the most detested man in the whole 
Hawaiian group. His occupancy of the highest office in the 
islands has been an eyesore and a constant irritation to the 
natives, who, though good natured and forgiving to a fault, 
never could have brought themselves to forget this man's 
ingratitude to them, their royal house, and their country. 
As long as he was on the throne, as it were, they never 
would have yielded more than a dissatisfied, disgruntled 
loyalty to our regime. Born in the islands of missionary 
parents, he was for years pampered and fed by the Kamea- 
hamehas, and ultimately given the position of Chief Justice. 
Whilst holding that office he secretly turned traitor, became 
the leader of a revolution, organized a so-called vigilance 
committee, and dethroned the reigning house that had done 
so much for him. His appointment as Governor of course 
gave rise to much unrest that never would have been ap- 



peased so long as he held that office. Agitation against him 
has been so rife that there was danger that it would break 
out into revolt. He is to be deposed not one moment too soon, 
and will probably come to the mainland to end his days, 
it was a happy thought that suggested Colonel Parker as his 
successor. Persona grata to the natives, to the businessmen 
aud to the ex-Queen, he is at the same time staunchly loyal 
to the United States. It will not be long before he has united 
all elements in bonds of mutual esteem and concord. Of 
mixed blood, he is half a Kanaka, and by training and educa- 
tion he is wholly a man and a gentleman. Possessed of a 
large estate, he entertains like a prince, and as a Governor 
who wants to be popular in these hospitable islands should. 
He is not unversed in public affairs, as he served for some 
time as Prime Minister to the late Queen. Aloha! We con- 
gratulate the Hawaiians. 



STILL DRAGGING ALONG. 

Each day the news from Alturas makes more apparent 
the fact that the lynchers of the Halls and Daniel Yantis 
will not be brought to justice. The whole thing will end in a 
fizzle, with more hard feelings engendered than would 
have been brought about oy the lynching of a dozen such 
men as the victims of the infamous Lookout tragedy. The 
whole fiasco comes from trying the case in Modoc County, 
among men who are mostly sympathizers with the lynchers, 
and before a Judge who is not qualified to deal with such 
an important affair. There is a suspicion, too, that Dis- 
trict Attorney Bonner is in collusion with the lawyers for 
the defense, and instead of performing his sworn duty is 
aiding the guilty ones to escape justice. During the pro- 
gress of the trial Wednesday, Judge Harrington made the 
open accusation that Bonner is guilty of such malfeasance 
of office. With his usual fearlessness he blurted out just 
what he thought; but so strenuous has been this trial that 
this accusation, the gravest that could be made against Bon- 
ner as an official, produced hardly a ripple of excitement. 

The defense continues its obstruction tactics, subjecting 
each witness to a long, nonsensical, reiterative cross-ex- 
amination. There are one hundred more witnesses to be 
examined, and it may be easily seen that the trial will drag 
on for weary weeks to come. If Judge Harrington can 
stand the strain he will prove himself a man of wonderful 
endurance. His patience is tested to the breaking point 
every minute of each session. It may be, though, that such 
a fight is pure enjoyment to him. 



ARBITRATION. 



Two threatened strikes in the East have just been averted 
by arbitration, which indicates that the year is opening with 
omens of industrial peace. The arbitration committee of the 
National Civic Federation has just composed the differences 
between the Clothing Manufacturers' Association of New 
York and its employees. Had it not been for the work of 
a sub-committee representing both the employers and the 
men, strikes involving some 55,000 garment workers would 
probably have ensued. On a smaller scale, but quite as 
interesting, is the outcome of the dispute between a Brook- 
lyn shoe manufacturing firm and its employees. Mr. Stark. 
State Mediator of Industrial Disputes, who was lately chosen 
as a fifth member of a committee intrusted with the de- 
cision of the question at issue, has decided in favor of the 
employers. While the Civic Federation Committee has had 
to depend solely upon its own tact, and the sense of fairness 
between those for whom it acted, the decision of Mr. Stark 
is backed by a $10,000 forfeit by the side that might refuse 
to abide by his award. The difference in the character of the 
two decisions is, perhaps, due to these differing conditions 
of arbitration. The Civic Federation Committee made con- 
cessions to both disputants. Mr. Stark gave his decision 
unequivocally for the employer. A definite decision is much 
more likely to be rendered when the judge feels that he has 
final power in his own hands than when he must negotiate 
in order to secure its acceptance. In the two cases to which 
we are alluding the decisions were accepted with a little 
grumbling on both sides, yet they were accepted, and this 
we take to be a good augury that the recent movements in 
favor of arbitration have in them the promise of favorable 
results. 



February 1, 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE PRICE OF WEALTH. 

In one of the dailies the other tiny an article was pub- 
hat a peanut vendor of this town had 
bought a lot on Eddy street, for which he paid J. 
that he will erect an apartment house on It at ai 

It Is an Investment of 160.000. all made from 
selling peanuts. This man started In life very poor, with a 
determination to become rich. He reared a family, ai 
accumulated a fortune of 160.000. The whole family has 
worked, and by their aid he has accomplished his object In 
life, ills path has not been an easy one. He has toiled 
night and day. In all kinds of weather, and has given up the 
ordinary pleasures of life — but he has become rich. Are you 
willing to attain wealth at the same sacrifice? Probably 
pot. Yet, most likely, you complain because you have not a 
fortune. This peanut man's experience Is an evidence that 
a person of ordinary intelligence can acquire riches by mak- 
ing the proper sacrifice. Those who are not willing should 
»ot complain at lack of success. There are three sisters in 
San Francisco who sold fruit at street corners. They wore 
shabby clothing, drove their own wagon, toiled in the rain, 
gave up everything. Many people pitied them ; but they were 
saving their money, buying property, and now they have 
houses In this city from which they draw a fine income. 

These are merely one or two examples, but enough to 
show that riches are within the grasp of nearly anyone will- 
ing to work and suffer for them. A man earning two dollars 
a day cap, by strict economy and denying himself all pleas- 
ures, save half of it. There is a carpenter in this town 
who saved in that way until he got a few hundred dollars 
ahead. He kept his eyes out for the main chance, and about 
four years ago he started building cottages in the out- 
skirts of town, selling them at a good profit. He spent his 
nights and Sundays drawing plans, and his days in working 
harder than any of his employees. His business has pros- 
pered. Last year he put up over fifty houses, clearing nearly 
$600 on each one. He is becoming rich, yet there are thou- 
sands of people in San Francisco who are getting far more 
enjoyment out of life than he is, although not making 
money. They have chosen their path — but they should not 
object, as most of tnem do, to his success. They could have 
attained it by the same methods. 

Money cannot be gained without giving up something else. 
It could in pioneer days, but as a rule it went as easily as it 
came, and those who made millions were few. The fickle 
goddess of fortune demands that you worship no one else. 
V you are willing to make the sacrifice, all right — if not, 
don't complain. 



THE TRUE SCOPE OF A PHILIPPINE INVESTIGATION. 

Senator Hoar's resolution to investigate the Philippine 
war has been referred to a committee of which. Senatoi 
Lodge Is chairman, and it will go hard with the imperialists 
if that be not the end of It. Senator Hoar is, however, 
sticking to his text, and has given notice that he will move 
for a special investigation by a special committee. There 
is much to investigate. There is Secretary Alger's state- 
ment, made in his recently published book, that the capture 
of the islands was determined upon long before Dewey 
fought his celebrated battle. That statement, if true, and 
Alger was in a position to know, upsets all that the public 
has been led to believe in respect to the origin of the Philip- 
pine war, as well as to its purposes and its motives. That 
war has been a great national calamity, having now cost 
the United States some $300,000,000 and thousands of Ameri- 
can lives, while it has swept with fire and sword the land 
the Filipinos, who never did us any harm, destroyed their 
towns and villages, and sent to untimely graves uncounted 
numbers of the native population. We owe it to every in- 
stinct of our national being that these things should be 
known, and if wrong be proven, it 'should be righted by 
the great American people, and the blame should be borne, 
not by the nation, but by the administration responsible 
for it. If, on the other hand, no unworthy act has been clone, 
let our pages of history be cleared of the stigma that such 
Speeches as those of Senator Hoar has cast upon them. 
Call the witnesses, both American and Filipino. Let us know 
of the early relations of Admiral Dewey and Generals An- 
derson, Merritt, and Otis with Aguinaldo. Call Consul-Gen- 



cr»l Pratt and Judge Day. llrlng over Mahlnl and AgiilnaMu 
and have than) t .-II what they know, Ha. k In a Ion onllght 

Britain put the man who gave her 240.00 
subjects on his trial for no worse offenses than Senator Boat 

now charges against U onalble for tha Filipino war. 

Those charges, all unanswered as the] mbedded In 

the archives of Congress, and win fin m the material on 

which history will be based. They coma from perhaps the 
foremost man in the Senate, who has never permitted his 
attitude on the Philippine question to divone him from 
the support of the party in power. Wipe out his charges or 
i" tify our wrongs. 



NEBRASKA'S DELEGATE TO THE CORONATION. 
Mr. William Jennings Bryan is not the only crank in Ne- 
braska. There is Mrs. Henrietta Dewey of 807 South Six 
teenth street. Omaha, who is packing up her belongings and 
is going to see the coronation of King Edward VII. Mrs. 
Dewey is not going as an envoy from the United States to 
Great Britain, but in a private capacity. Her mission is to 
make trouble — and the history of the late divorced Mrs. 
Carrie Nation of Kansas proves conclusively that in the mak 
ing oi trouble a woman is far superior to her sterner partner. 
.Mrs. Dewey declares tnat it is her intention to pick out some 
nice, exposed spot that shall be passed by the coronation 
procession and there to stand until the King goes by and to 
shout where all may hear her that Edward VII Is a traitor, 
a thief, and several other very undesirable kinds of things. 
It seems that at the outbreak of the South African war, 
South Africa was unfortunate enough to claim Mrs. Dewey 
as one of its inhabitants. She was as much of a crank in 
those days as now, and at the incroachment of the British 
army she was the loudest to proclaim the British as rapscal- 
lions of a very deep dye. Much to her surprise the British 
were business-like in their methods and wasted no time in 
declaring her a belligerant and in treating her as such. 
This shocked and hurt Mrs. Dewey, who supposed that it 
was the divine right of women to speak and escape the 
consequences, and after she had said her say she indignantly 
shook the soil of South Africa, leaving her property in Brit- 
ish hands. And now Mrs. Dewey has planned a vengeance 
worthy of Nebraska, Kansas, or even Colorado. She will 
go to London and she will make the King feel very small in 
the day of his pride. One shadow, however, falls across the 
glamor of her roseate dream. The English police regulations 
are, unfortunately, somewhat strict, and the "bobbies" are 
ever on the lookout for just Mrs. Dewey's stripe of Anar- 
chist. Mrs. Dewey will probably spend coronation day in 
a cozy little London jail, while one voice from Nebraska 
will be temporarily still in the land. It would be more to the 
credit of our nation at large if she were detained in United 
States territory. 



THE COLOR LINE ABOLISHED. 

There was a very exciting meeting Tuesday of the Cali- 
fornia Club, composed of some of the leading women of 
San Francisco. The subject under consideration was the ap- 
proval or disapproval of the admittance of colored delegates 
to the General Federation of Women's Clubs. A ballot was 
taken on the matter a week ago, and the question was set- 
tled in favor of the colored women by a vote of sixty to 
twenty. The minority w°re dissatisfied, so called a meeting 
Tuesday for the purpose of rescinding the vote. From all 
accounts it was a merry meeting. There were nearly two 
hundred women present, each one of whom had decided 
viaws upon the subject, and was anxious to have them 
heard. Miss Mabel Craft led the progressives (in favor of 
abolishing the color line), and Mrs. E. L. Campbell led the 
conservatives. The vote was in favor of the former, standing 
one hundred and one to eighty-two. Some very bright 
speeches were made iu the general bedlam preceding the 
balloting. Mrs. Henry Highton aided considerably in influ- 
encing the vote toward the progressives by a clear-cut, logi- 
cal, telling speech that she made. She showed a thorough 
knowledge of her subject, and has been warmly congratu- 
lated on her oratorical efforts. The California Club now 
stands on record as the friend of the colored women's clubs, 
and it is likely that the little antipathies engendered by 
Tuesday's meeting will soon be forgotten. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 



"ONE MAN, ONE BUSINESS." 
The Labor Party in the Commonwealth of Australia is 
strong, well organized, and holds the balance of power in 
Parliament. It therefore gets its way in most things. The 
ministry of the day had to accept its dicta as to nearly 
every one of the schedules of the new tariff, or be voted out 
of office. A new idea has been sprung that promises to 
become a shibboleth to conjure with in the hands of the 
working people. It is known as "one man, one business." 
That is to say, this young democracy wants legislation which 
will forbid any man carrying on more than one kind of busi- 
ness. The country is to be run on the basis of "every snob 
to his last," as it were. It is the great department stores 
that are primarily aimed at. There are no trusts "in Aus- 
tralia, as we have them in this country, but gigantic retail 
establishments, in which pretty nearly everything that is 
saleable can be bought, are springing up on all hands, 
consequently, the small tradesmen are going under. The 
great composite businesses of the modern city are looked 
upon as social wrongs that must be suppressed at all haz- 
ards. The cry is one man one business to-day; it will not 
unlikely be "one man one coat" to-morrow. Says a Mel- 
bourne exchange: "The idea is visibly growing among the 
artisan class that the amount of work to be done must be 
pooled and distributed with rough equality amongst all the 
workers. Anyone who. by superior energy and quickness 
does more work than his fellows is regarded as a traitor 
to his class." The extension of that idea to commerce very 
naturally follows, and so emerges the demand for "one man 
one business." Where such a restrictive policy would stop 
it is hard to say. It would probably end in the adoption of 
the whole socialistic programme. The community would 
own every business and the profits would be equally divided 
around among its members. They have already got old age 
pensions in some of the States of the Commonwealth, which 
is certainly a long step on the road to an equal division of all 
.hings intended for man's use and comfort. There is no 
disguising the fact that the trend of modern democracy 
is towards socialism. The labor men in Australia have such 
direct control of legislation that they can effect results 
quicker than their fellows elsewhere, but all alike are bound 
for the same goal, and when they reach it — what then? 



Miss Stone's ransom has been paid and that lady has gone 
over the counter as a bargain. 



THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF CONSUMPTION. 

The great medical conference held in London last year is 
resulting in increased endeavors to prevent and cure con- 
sumption in England and on the Continent. King Edward 
VII has just had one million dollars placed at his disposal 
by a wealthy London merchant, w r ho does not wish his name 
made public, to aid in carrying out the recommendations of 
the Royal Commission, which the King some time ago ap- 
pointed to consider and report what measures ought to be 
adopted to stay the ravages of the dread disease. It is known 
that one of the first things to be done in the building of a 
large sanitorium in a healthy locality not yet selected. We 
may be sure that this Royal Sanitorium will be a model in- 
stitution in every way. The deep interest the King takes 
in it will, if nothing else did, insure its getting all the 
money it may from time to time need. It is known to be 
the ambition of the King to accomplish during his life time 
the placing of sanitoriums for consumptives in suitable 
localities throughout the kingdom, and the one to be now 
commenced is to be a model for all the rest. At the confer- 
ence held last summer the King made a famous speech 
which has since stimulated scientific medical research, not 
in his own country alone, but throughout the civilized world, 
and in which he used the epigrammatic phrase: "If prevent- 
able why not prevent?" He is now showing in the most prac- 
ticable manner possible how the crusade against tuberculosis 
can be best carried out. "Good balmy air and plenty of it" 
is the last word, so far, of medical science as to the treat- 
ment of the consumptive. The best hope at present for 
the cure of the disease lies simply in strengthening, by ra- 
tional modes of living, the resisting power of the human 
organism. Let us hope that more knowledge will be one of 
the results of the King's sanitorium. To the disgrace of the 
city of San Francisco be it said, we have no hospital accom- 
modation for consumptives. Our "sovereign" is the working 
man. Now that he is in power let him take care of his 
kind. 



If justice is always as slow in Modoc County as in the pres- 
ent Alturas trial, there is much to excuse lynching as a stand- 
ing institution. 



Admiral Schley's repeated declaration that he is not out 
for office is one of the reasons why politicians ought to look 
out for him. 



Those who have seen the photograph of Kaiser Wilhelm 
in whiskers have no difficulty in seeing why his wife had the 
picture suppressed. 



The Board of Health in East Boston just vaccinated the 
whole town. The East Boston doctor may be cultured, but 
he certainly does nothing by halves. 



They are putting a new hot air plaint in at the City Hall, 
partly to heat the building, and partly to furnish argument 
to the attorneys in the various courts. 



Sybil Sanderson, in her recent refusal to grant an inter- 
view to a newspaper reporter, surprised us all by showing 
that she was capable of learning by experience. 



Rakowsky, the soldier who threatened the life of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, went through the city on his way to Alca- 
traz — no bands met him at the depot, however. 



The artist who designed King Edward's profile for the 
new British postage stamp would have been decapitated 
for high treason in the days of Bluff King Hal. 



The papers tell us that Hans Hein, who died of starvation 
this week, was a remittance man, but the nature of his de- 
mise would indicate that he was a non-remittance man. 



The drowning of one hundred Portuguese pilgrims who 
were journeying to the shrine of St. Xavier in India, speaks 
poorly for the saving power of the saint they honored. 



Last Sunday, while hunting in the woods near Auburn, Al- 
bert Ralston mistook his companion Frank Said for a deer 
and shot him fatally. No one would blame the hunter who 
would shoot Ralston mistaking him for a fool. 



Mr. W. C. Arnett of Oakland is determined to fast six 
months to cure himself of gout. If he had fasted in the days 
of his youth this would not have been necessary. 



Two Philadelphia bachelors refused to admit some young 
women to dance under their supervision, because, they said, 
they objected to the cut of their gowns. Mr. Harry Lehr 
is not our only fashionable dressmaker, you see. 



We are told by the dailies that Terry McGovern has 
"broken into exclusive society." One can see at a glance 
that a society that would admit the lad with the terrible 
swing must be exclusive, not to say select. 



It was fortunate that the Prince of Wales chose the winter 
in which to visit Berlin, for in the cold season the general 
chilliness of the German atmosphere might not appear so 
strange to him. 



Rev. Mr. William Greig, who disabled two burglars with 
an umbrella, did more for the conversion of the criminal 
classes than all the sensational prison revivalists in the 
business. 



Some time ago Judge Ogden decided that the Oakland 
husband who stayed out all night did not give sufficient 
provocation for divorce. And now Judge Hall has decided 
that the Oakland wife may linger away from home till 
dawn without snapping the marital bonds. It will soon 
come to such a pass in the Sleeping City that married pairs • 
will have to stay away from home after dark in order to see 1 
anything of each other. 



February 1, 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



The Prince of Fakers 



President Roosevelt Exposes the Latest Local Palmistry Fra.tid 



" "Trance clairvoyance, palmistry, fortune-toiling, and • 

• parlor magic may no long >rded as more catch- • 

• penny tra Sir Henry Pritchard (.sir Henry, if • 

• you phase' i has gracefully descended from his seat in • 

• the peerage and deigned to take out full-page advertise- • 

• m- nts in the evening papers, describing himself as • 

• "Eminent Psychlst, Palmist and Trance-Clairvoyant, • 

• direct from Cecil Hotel, London, England." Brewing. I • 

• learn from various books on peerage, first became re- • 

• spectable when it was pursued by those bearing titles. • 

• And now the next trade to become decent through the * 

• magic touch of the aristocrat is clairvoyance. God wot, • 

• it has needed something to make it respectable. Now * 

• will Ismar the Gypsy be good? Now will Sir Harry • 

• Westwood Cooper promise to reform? "As a test Sir * 

• Henry will tell you your full name, etc.," the advertise- * 

• ment promises in closing. That is very obliging of the * 

• nobleman, but I for one would feel more relieved if he • 

• would reveal his own full name 'as a test.' " * 

This is a clipping from our Town Crier of January 18th. 
The Town Crier generally hits the nail on the head, and in 
this case he aimed with more than usual accuracy. Here in 
California, where we nave the largest grapes and the pret- 
tiest girls in the world, we are sometimes brought face to 
face with frauds of such transcendant nerve and gall 
that even a Californian, being in the midst of extremes 
and superlatives, must stand astonished. 

The latest monumental and adamantine fraud that infests 
our city, as was noticed by the Town Crier, is an alleged 
palmist, seer, prophet, psychic, who deals wholesale in good 
luck, planets, influences and charms. He takes large space 
in the dailies, poses as a British nobleman, and claims to 
have been chummy with every celebrity in Europe, and 
claims to be on terms of warmest intimacy with every 
crowned king or belted earl worth mentioning. 

His advertisements have all the ear-marks of a charlatan 
and a scoundrel. The News Letter has abundant proof that 
he is both. 

That the daily press should countenance such an arrant 
fraud is incomprehensible. No paper containing his adver- 
tisement is legally mailable, as such papers are guilty of as- 
sisting a fraud, and are unmailable under the regulations. 
The attention of the Postal Inspector is called to this matter, 
and the News Letter will cheerfully furnish information on 
this point. 

Furthermore, there is evidence that the bogus "Sir" is a 
lecherous villain, who should be served to a closely-fitting 
suit of tar and feathers. 

We are in receipt of numerous letters from people of good 
standing, complaining of this fellow's libertinous attitude 
to such women as have visited his office. That "Sir" Henry is 
a moral debauchee is more dangerous than that he is a 
mere fraud. If the abundance of complaints coming through 
the mails daily are true (and we have no reason to doubt 
their genuineness) no woman is safe in visiting his studio. 

Last Tuesday the wife of a prominent city official was 
duped into visiting the sink of iniquity presided over by 
this "Sir" Henry, and was most vilely and grossly insulted; 
the husband was only restrained from wreaking summary 
vengeance on the scoundrel by the fact that a merited 
thrashing would expose his wife to unpleasant notoriety. 
The matter was referred to the Police Department, who are 
closing the coils of the law about the fraudulent "Sir" 
Henry. 

Below is a practical proof of the spuriousuess of this 
charlatan. In an article recently published in the daily 
press entitled "President Roosevelt's Fate Lines," etc., and 
signed by "Sir" Henry Pritchard, the following appears: 

"Upon my arrival from London, I made a visit to Washing- 
ton for the express purpose of securing an impression of 
Mr. Roosevelt's palms, and below is a character reading 



of the same Although, like all newspaper renders I had 
heard much of Theodore Roosevelt, it was not until l ex- 
amined bis palms that I fully realized the marked Individual- 
ity of the man. • • • 1 hm ■ aminod a hand Which 
more thoroughly pointed to a man destined to become a 
leader of men than does Mr. Theodore Roosevelt's. The 
most prominent feature of President Roosevelt's hand is 
the thumb. A man with such a thumb never remains long 
in obscurity." 

The above quotation is a lie pure and simple, and it is a 
fair Inference that every line of "Sir" Henry's advertisements 
is a lie pure and simple. A copy of the paper containing the 
articie from which the above excerpts were taken was 
mailed to the President by a News Letter representative, 
with the inquiry as to the truth of the statements contained 
therein. Very promptly the answer came as follows: 



Personal. 



WHITE HOUSE, 

WASHINGTON. 



January 21, 1902. 



My dear Sir: 

In reply to your letter of the 15th 
instant, with enclosed clipping, I would 
state that the story Is absolutely false. 
The President has never had his hand read by 
anyone, and has never, so far as he recollects, 
seen the gentleman mentioned in the article 
which you forwarded. 

Thanking you for your courteous inquiry, 
believe me , 

Very truly yours , 




Secretary to the President. 



We take pleasure in publishing these exhibits in the case 
of the people vs. "Sir" Henry Pritchard, psychist, palmist, 
trance clairvoyant, seducer, fraud, and debauchee, in the 
hope that the public will cease to encourage his criminal 
dealings with their patronage, and especially that wise 
husbands and fathers will heed our warning. Meanwhile, 
the abode of "Sir" Harry Westwood Cooper is yawning for 
"Sir" Henry Pritchard. 



The patrons of the Grand Hotel Caf6, Fay & Foster, 

proprietors, are never in doubt as to whether they will get 
a good lunch. Experience has taught them that the mer- 
cantile lunch served there daily from 11 to 2 is unexcelled. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




. Wand 

6Jicity/wit/ancf&ufP/tcaun's.' 

j _ 7-.„.«—- ^af 




Logically, it is all wrong that the Tivoli should put on a bet- 
ter production of "The Ameer" than the one sent us from 
New York with Mr. Frank Daniels in the title role. In 
the first place, the Mew York production came here at a 
dollar and a half per seat, and in the second, the fame of 
Mr. Daniels extends all over the country. In contrast to these 
are the facts that the Tivoli will seat you for twenty-five, 
fifty and seventy-five cents, and that Mr. Hartman isn't so 
famous as some of his admirers think he deserves to be. 
Yet there are plenty of witnesses of both productions who 
agree that Mr. Hartman outshines Mr. Daniels, and that there 
are other good features that make our local Ameer more 
enjoyable than the Eastern production. 

While not willing to acknowledge all that some of the 
Tivolites maintain, I agree that Mr. Hartman is better as the 
Ameer than Mr. Daniels is. An apathy for Mr. Daniels' 
style of comedy may have something to do with this opinion; 
but to counterbalance this is a decided dislike for Mr. Hart- 
man in many of the things he undertakes. As the Ameer 
he suppresses his few bad qualities, and brings out his 
many good ones, giving by these means a characterization 
that is crowded with genuine comedy and little clownish- 
ness. His costumes are gorgeous and impressive, and he 
lives up to them. Of course he falls down a little on the 
"Ben Franklin" song. There is a peculiar little lilt to it 
that requires a voice with just a suspicion of melody in it — 
and Mr. Hartman himself will tell you that his isn't that kind 
of a voice. 

The Ameer is better than most of the latter-day operas. 
There are one or two songs in "The Idol's Eye" and "The 
Wizard of the Nile" that outclass anything in The Ameer, 
but all the energy was expended upon them; one has to sit 
through a somewhat dreary performance to hear them. 
There is melody all through The Ameer; what it lacks in 
bursts of high quality it makes up in continuous entertain- 
ment. 

It is good to see Anna Lichter back at the Tivoli again — ■ 
good, also, to note that she has lost the weight which she 
acquired during the latter part of her former engagement 
there, and is again the slender Anna who charmed us all 
in "Girofle-Girofla." Her voice has not lost any of its 
power to please, although the role of Constance in The 
Ameer does not give her much chance to exploit it. Fran- 
ces Graham is another returned favorite, and her rich con- 
tralto is heard to advantage as Mirzah. Annie Myers has 
a part as Fannie that suits her sprightly personality. 

Mr. Harry Cashman as the Chamberlain is very amusing 
— something that can hardly be said of Mr. Webb as the 
court jester. Although he sings very well he seems to lack 
the proper conception of his part, and misses many chances 
to help the fun along. 

Mr. Harold Gordon is the new tenor at the Tivoli. He 
may have all the voice that has been claimed for him, but it 
isn't in much evidence in The Ameer. His voice is pleasing 
in quality, but when a tenor is singing a baritone part with 
a cold he can't give the public much of an idea of his talents. 
Judgment on Mr. Gordon will have to be reserved for awhile. 
Mr. Arthur Cunningham's excellent baritone does not get 
much of an opportunity. 

The chorus does good work in The Ameer, and the stage 
settings and costumes are fully adequate. Nothing put on 
at the Tivoli could eclipse the lavishness of effect in the 
third act. 

* • • 

Mr. M. L. Alsop wears black suspenders, and Mr. Howard 
Scott wears very pretty blue ones — interesting facts re- 
vealed in "Coralie & Co.," the French farce now on at the 
Alcazar. The audience was expecting a lot of undressing 
in the modiste's parlor scene in the second act, and was pre- 
pared to be properly shocked. Mr. Alsop and Mr. Scott 
doffed their coats and waistcoats, and Miss Crosby was fitted 
for a dress; but it was all very mild indeed — the first act 



was far more of a revelation. 

Farce brings out the capabilities of the Alcazar Company 
better than Joes drama, and even on Monday night the mem 
bers were pretty much at home in Coralie & Co. It is on the 
familiar French plan — faithless husbands and wives, secret 
meetings, discoveries, the innocent suspected, then vindi 
cated, and all that. Madame Coralie's dressmaking parlors 
are a rendezvous for quiet meetings between people who 
cannot meet in public. By an ingenuous arrangement the 
walls are made movable, so that when unwelcome visitors 
come the scene can be changed instantly into one of com- 
plete and convincing innocence. 

Coralie & Co. is toned down considerably for American pro- 
duction, but there is enough spice left in it to convince one 
that it must have been a very, very naughty play in the 
original. Such plays as Coralie & Co. should be produced at 
the Midway Plaisance, where they could be done full justice. 
The Alcazar management is compelled to bow to a few 
conventionalities, but not enough to make good its claim 
to being a family theatre. Such a farce as "Charley's Aunt," 
lately produced there, is wholesome and clean, full of deli- 
cious wit, amusing to the full limit; Coralie & Co. makes vir- 
tue a jest, and has no wit that is not suggestive. It has 
some funny situations, but they all hinge on illicit love. 

Mr. Alsop plays Henri Lavelle, which gives him a good 
chance to exploit his excellencies as a comedian. If he would 
learn that a smile does not express grief, it would be a 
great improvement, .^s for Mr. Bacon, who plays Stephen 
Coralie, I don't believe he could smile if he tried. All his 
comedy is done with a funereal gravity that adds to its 
charm. Mr. Howard Scott has a very congenial part, well 
played, in Andre Pilliard. 

Mr. George Osbourne is well cast as Joseph Pinglet, a 
part in which he does some good work. Clemence Pinglet is 
acceptably done by Juliet Crosby. 

Marion Convere was to have played Lucienne, but was 
taken ill, and Margaret Wycherly had to assume the role on 
very short notice, doing so with entire credit to herself. 
The meddlesome aunt, as done by Lillian Elliott, is a thor- 
oughly good piece of character work. Miss Marie Howe is 
excellent as Madame Coralie. 

Georgie Woodthorpe as Double Blanc, Madame Coralie's 
servant, is startling in her make-up, which too closely ap- 
proaches the hideous to be pleasing; but her comedy is high- 
class. Oza Waldorp is an exceedingly charming little house- 
maid. 

* • • 

Kelly & Violette, Orpheum, must have their own tailor 
and uressmaker with them. They are entitled to be dubbed 
the "fashion plate duo." Even when they used to sing and 
dance at our music halls their wardrobe was notable. Now 
that they have climbed to me dignity of appearing upon the 
Orpheum circuit they have developed sartorially also. They 
both show improvement in their singing, and do a very at- 
tractive turn. Still Violette is not so fetching in some ways 
as in her music hall days. She has a larger wardrobe and 
sings better, but the repression with which she works now 
is very different from the slap-dash of a couple of years ago — 
her hosiery is an unsolved mystery to Orpheum audiences. 

The "Cycle Whirl" is the most startling and fascinating 
thing ever seen at the Orpheum. Imagine a funnel-shaped 
wooden affair, twenty-two feet across at the top and twenty 
at the bottom, giving the sides, which are made of slats, an 
angle of seventy degrees. Around the inside of this two 
men ride, their bodies almost horizontal, at terrific speed. 
It is a nervy, daring act, taking cool heads and steady hands. 

Miss Josephine Sabel is back again. She is announced 
as a vocalist and comedienne, both of which titles fit her. 
The French song with which she opens her turn is given 
with true Gallic vivacity, and her other imitations are high- 
class. It is a pity that her work is marred by considerable 
unpleasant coarseness. 

Jordan & Crouch are fair singers and better dancers. The 
lady of the team is especially agile. The Da Comas are 
acrobats of a high order. The three men and three women 
do marvelous feats of strength and quickness. 

• • * 

Mr. Josef Hofmann, the pianist, is a very sane young man, 
who wears short hair parted on the side and uses only 
his hands in playing the piano. All this sanity might be 



February 1, 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



expected of ordinary pianists, but in a genius Ilk. Mr liof. 

mann has proven himself to be. one would natnrall) 

a tangled mane and wild mannerisms. Mr. Hofmann haa 

none of these, but slta down In a business-Ill- • 

pounds, coaxes and caresses all manner of melodj 

bis instrument — or. rather, some one else's, his own piano 

having failed to arrive in time for Tuesday's perforn 

Mr Hofmann Is variously aged, the papers giving his 
at twenty-four, twenty-five and twenty-Six. He looks 
younger, and his work gives promise that the rears win 
develop him Into a master. He is a wonderfully good i 
and his reception by San Francisco music lovers has 
enthusiastic He has not the power that Pederewski has 
of producing hysterics, but he satisfies the critical with 
good, honest, straightforward playing, combined with deli- 
cate perception and marvelous technique. 

Probably the most charming number on Tuesday's pro- 
gramme was Liszt's "Gnomenreigen." full of fairy-like strains 
brought out with feathery touches. There is incredible 
swiftness of movement in it, and tremolos as soft as the 
rustling of leaves — eerie melody that blots out all memory 
of the world. 

Schubert's "Soiree de Vienne" assumed new characteris- 
tics and unthought-of beauties under Mr. Hofmanns skill- 
ful hand. To still insistent applause he played Schubert's 
"March Militant." This and the "Tannhauser" overture, 
which was his closing number, were dizzying in their wild 
wealth of color, passion and harmony — booming, thunderous, 
and melodious. W. J. W. 



It appears that another sick singer is to appear in San 
Francisco — Madam Nordica. She is billed to sing in our 
town at big, stiff prices next week. She is a very ill woman, 
but that will not prevent her managers taking money from 
the public to hear her try to sing. We had the same ex- 
perience during the last grand opera season with Calve. 
She sang in "Carmen" when she was hardly able to stand. 
It gave no pleasure to the public, but it meant money for 
Calve's manager. The same tactics are being adopted in the 
case of Nordica. 

The announcement appeared in the dispatches this week, 
"Nordica will sing," and the item went on to tell that she will 
positively appear here next Tuesday night. The same dis- 
patch announces that she was lying 1 aursday in her private 
car at Santa Barbara, too ill to make the journey South, and 
that her engagements at San Diego and Redlands had been 
cancelled. Physicians were in constant attendance, but 
"Nordica will make every effort to keep her engagement in 
San Francisco." She gave a performance at Santa Barbara 
Wednesday night with physicians in constant attendance, 
and at the end of the programme broke down completely. 

This is the Nordica who is being brought to San Francisco 
at exorbitant prices. Probably it is not Nordica's fault. She 
is under a manager, and his only thought is money. As long 
as she can stand, as long as money flows into the box-office, 
as long as people will pay money to hear an ill woman's 
pitiful attempts to sing, he will hold her tyrannically to her 
contract. 

It is about time for San Francisco people to awaken and to 
refuse to give up money to help along such fraudulent 
schemes. A singer to do full justice to herself, must be in 
perfect physical condition. Nordica is in no condition at 
all. She came to California for her health. She was 
badly hurt in a railroad accident on her way here. She is 
able to appear on the stage, of course, but what pleasure is 
it to hear her? San Francisco is a paradise for fake prize- 
fighters and managers of ill, broken-down singers. It is 
about time for us to learn to save our money for legitimate 
attractions. 

* * . 

At the Alcazar, "Coralie & Co." will give way next week to 
"The Danites," written by Mr. Joaquin Miller. The play 
deals with pioneer days, and the plot centers around a band 
of Mormons who have killed the family of the heroine. The 
entire Alcazar Company will be in the cast. 

Adelina Roattino, prima donna, Mr. Joseph Reichens and 
his trained dogs, the Faust trio in their comedy, "The 
Haunted Mill," are the new-comers at the Orpheum. The 
holdovers are Kelly & Violette, Josephine Sabel, Jordan & 
Crouch, the pa Comas and the biograph. 



Ml** Viola Allen Is to present her new play. "In the Palaee 
of the King." it the Colombia Theatre next week. Mr. I^orl- 
mcr Stoddard, who ilrnmali7.il Taaa " for Mm Flsk' 
made Mr. F. Marlon Crawford's romantic novel Into a play. 

Mien lias tin- role of Dona DolOTOt da Mendoza. "In 
the Palace of the King" is divided into six scenes, The 

y and costumes of this play conform to the eras of 

Philip the Second and Bliaabeth. 

Mr. Josef Hofmann. the pianist, will give two extra re- 
citals at Metropolitan Temple on Wednesday night, i-cbru- 
ary i.th. and Saturday afternoon, February 16th. The sale 
of seats will begin at Sherman, Clay & Cos Monday. Priced 
|».00, 11.60, J1.00 and 50 cents. 

"The Ameer" will be continued next week at the Tlvoll 
with the same cast as it opened With. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market, Speotatty. " Cotton Gas" for painless teeth extrftcttne 



AsmBciAS Dispensary, 514 Pine street, abo.e Kearney. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kueling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp! 
" The Hit of the Year." 

THE AMEER 

" Don't Overlook this Show." 

Popular prices— 25, 60, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



1 San Francisco 'o Greatest Music Hall. 

r P lie U DTI . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, February 2. 

Adelina Poattino; Relchen's Hand Balancing Dogs; The Fau«t Trio; 
Kelly and Violette; Da Coma Family; Jordan and Crouch; The 
Biograph, and , 

THE GREAT GYGLE WHIRL 

Reserved seats, 25c; Balcony 10c: opera chairs and box seats, 50o. 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday - 

r\ 1 rr i_ i Belasco & Thall, Managers. 

rAlcazar I neaxre. phone Main 254 

Next week, a presentation of the Great Western play, 

THE DANITES 

California's Representative Drama. A wonderful romance, beauti" 
fully presented. Full Btrength of the Surpassing Alcazar Stock Co. 
Regular Matinees Saturday and Hunday. Prices, 15c, 25o, 35o, 50o 
and 75c. Seats on sale six days In advance. 



Gottlob, Maes A ( o 

Lessees ana Managers. 



Columbia Theatre. 

Beeinnlnc NEXT MONDAY, February 3rd. 

VIOLA ALLEN 

and company, presenting Lorimer Stoddard's dramatization of F. 
Marion Crawford's famous historic novel, 

IIS THE PALAGE OF THE KING 

A love romance of old Madrid. 




RAOINGI 

EVERY WEEK DAY, RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m- sharp. 

Ferryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1. 1:30. 2:30 and 3 p. m„ 
connecting with trains stopping at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferryl tickets to Shell Mound. L&Bt two cars on train reserved for ladies 
and their escorts. No smoking. All trains via Oakland Mole connect with 
San Pablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadway, Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue electric cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric cars go direct to the 
track in fifteen minutes. 

Returning— Trains leave the track at 4:15 and 4:45 p. m, and Immediately 
after the last race. 

THOMAS H, wtt.t.tams, Jb., President. 

CHAS. F. PRICE, Secretary and Manager. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. . . ,.. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering place after the theatre 
la over 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




A book that cannot fail to please lovers 
Jane Austen. of good memoirs, is "Jane Austen, Her 
Homes and Her Friends." Miss Constance 
Hill, accompanied by her sister. Miss Ellen G. Hill, warm 
admirers of Miss Austen and her writings, determined, 
not long since, to seek out the places where the famous 
author had lived in order to learn all they could of her life 
and its surroundings. The outcome of this pilgrimage is a 
very readable biography, and fortunate are those who are 
privileged in imagination "to put back the finger of Time 
for more than a hundred years" and step with the Misses 
Hill into Miss Austen's presence. Through the kindness of 
members of various branches of the Austen family they had 
access to interesting manuscripts recording the home life 
at Steventon, at Chawton and elsewhere, and giving a picture 
also of the happy intercourse between "Aunt Jane" and the 
many young nephews and nieces with whom she was always 
"the center of attraction." Through the loan of family por- 
traits and pictures and contemporary sketches representing 
places associated with Miss Austen's life, which either no 
longer exist or are greatly altered, they were able to recon- 
struct much which seemed at first to be irrecoverably lost. 
Armed with pen and pencil these two devoted admirers of 
Jane Austen, eager to see the places where she dwelt, to 
look upon the scenes that she had looked upon, first threaded 
their way through Hampshire lanes to Steventon, her birth- 
place. Steventon Parsonage was destroyed in 1S26. Here 
"Sense and Sensibility" and "Pride and Prejudice" were 
written. In 18S0 the family removed to Bath, much to Jane 
Austen's sorrow, because she was warmly attached to her 
home. Miss Hill chronicles the fact that when she heard 
of the contemplated change she was so overcome that she 
fainted. While residing in Bath the unfinished tale of "The 
Watsons" was written. In the autumn of 1804 Jane Austen. 
with her father and mother, spent some weeks at Lynn 
Regis. Here, too, the Misses Mills sojourned, visiting the 
cottage in which tradition declares the Austens to have 
stayed. Later, following Miss Austen's steps, ihey went to 
Southampton. Of the village of Chawton and Chawton Cot- 
tage they have much to say. It was in 1S09 that the Austens 
settled here, and from here all Miss Austen's works were 
sent out into the world. Here a small mahogany desk which 
belonged to the author of "Pride and Prejudice" is still 
treasured by the family of her nephew and biographer. In 
Winchester, where Miss Austen spent her last days. Miss 
Hill visited College-street house, where she died in 1S17. 
and in the north aisle of Winchester Cathedral stood beside 
the spot where rest her mortal remains. Author and illus- 
trator have so happily combined their efforts in their labor 
of love that the reader who journeys with them through 
Austen-land will find no cause for regret. Some rare family 
portraits are reproduced — also views of the various houses 
where the Austens lived. These, with a facsimile of an auto- 
graph letter of Jane Austen, showing her firm, delicate hand- 
writing, and some very artistic tailpieces, add interest to 
a work which is admirably illustrated and is a credit to the 
publishers in every way. 

John Lane, Publisher, London and New York. Price, $6.00. 
Mr. W. C. Doub, A. B., County Super- 
Topical Discussion intendent of Schools for Kern County, 
of Geography. California, has ideas of his own anent 
the manner in which geography 
should be taught. In a small book entitled, "Topical Dis- 
cussion of Geography," which he recently prepared for use 
in the elementary schools, he outlines a course of study 
in geography which, he believes, will result in giving the 
pupil some real value for the time which he devotes to the 
subject. The work calls for a topical study of geography 
during the last two years of grammar school work, and 
differs from the present method of teaching and studying 
geography. 
The Macmlllan Co.. Publishers, New York. Price, 25 cents. 



A story which is thoroughly French and 

The Screen, which scarcely lends itself to a satisfactory 
English translation, although it must 
be said that the translation is remarkably well done. 
in M. Paul Bourget's novel of Parisian life, "The 
Screen." The writer says: "In love, classic deceptions are 
always the best, and a pronounced admiration for a pretty 
woman is an infallible way of making an impenetrable mys- 
tery of an intimacy with another. A humorist has brightly 
dubbed such unconscious accomplices of marital disloyalty 
'screen-women.' Mme. de Lantrec, a beautiful young 
woman belonging to the smart set of Paris, with a reputa- 
tion untarnished by scandal-mongers, serves unwittingly as 
a screen for her best friend and the lover of this friend. 
Such is iu brief, the story which M. Bourget tells in his most 
finished style. His knowledge of the world of fashion, his 
power of analysis and his ability to depict certain phases of 
character, give what value there is to the book in the origi- 
nal. The illustrations are dainty in the extreme. 

J. F. Taylor Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

.Mr. Howard V. Sutherland's 

Bigg's Bar and Other Klondike Ballads, which he issues 
Klondike Ballads. under the title of "Biggs's Bar," 

are redolent of beans and bacon. 
The dedication reads: "In memory of beans and bacon 
ninl this delectable dish is mentioned again and again, 
varied with descriptions of "That First Flapjack," "The 
Sorrows of Hairy Dick," and the death of "Pimply Pete." 
The Klondike mosquito is also immortalized in Mr. Suther- 
land's collection of verse. Of the quality of said verse the 
following will give some idea: 
"It is pitiless, pernicious, energetically vicious, 

But the angels seem to love it, for I've never killed one 
yet; 
And although I ain't no hero I long again for zero, 

For the blamed mosquito gets it in the neck them days, 
you bet! 
I i the neck the critter gets it, and serves him right, you bet! 

Drexel Biddle, Publisher, Philadelphia. Price, 75 cents. 

A Southern matron's memories are given 

Old Times in in "Old Times in Dixie Land." The au- 
Dixie Land. thor, Mrs. Caroline E. Merrick, is the 
daughter of a wealthy Southern planter 
ami the wife of a Chief Justice of Louisiana, the Hon. Edwin 
L. Merrick. Through her literary work and her effective 
advocacy in the South, with voice and pen, of the enfran- 
chisement of women, Mrs. Merrick has become widely known. 
The present volume contains a little of everything, from 
war memories, nervous prostration and equal suffrage, to 
dissertations on Mis. Julia Ward Howe, Francis Willard. 
and the writer's own home life. The style is sprightly and 
not without humor. 

The Grafton Press, Publishers, New York. 

One of the most delightful of this 

The Field of Clover, year's fairy books, and one of the 
most artistic as well, is Mr. Lau- 
rence Houseman's "The Field of Clover." The first story is 
in six parts: "The Fire-eaters," "The Galloping Plough," "The 
Thirsty Well," "The Princess Melilot." "The Burning Rose," 
and "The Camphor Worm." Four shorter tales make up 
the book, which will prove a delight to old and young. It 
is decorated and illustrated by its writer, who is a versatile 
artist and author, with rare originality of expression both 
with pen and pencil. In binding, cover design and illustra- 
tion the volume is unique and worthy Mr. Housman's repu- 
tation for fashioning fascinating fairy-lore. 

John Lane, Publishers, London and New York. Price, 
$1.25. 

Books Received. — Crane & Company: "A Colorado Colonel 
and Other Stories," by William Carey Campbell. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co. — "The Life of Saint Paul." by Rev. 
S. W Pratt, price 75 cents. MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 

Robertson's I26 Post street 



February 1, 1902 



•AN FRANCISCO NEW* LETTER. 



iDown Crier \#* 



Vafc 



'.tflttt fn 



!art t/*>u 
tllbfOU ' 



xn 




The Examiner came out with a broadsld al In 

which - the police of neglect of duty, saying that 

they do not dare make arrests without orders from their 
superiors. I know of one instance, at least, whli \\ p 
Mowship wrong. About 1890 the Examiners comp 
and editorial rooms were on Montgomery street, and under 
Death Its quarters was a saloon conducted by Peters Bros. 
Now. the policeman on that beat got into the habit of 
patronizing the Peters Bros, bar and forgetting to pay. 
He was reminded of his negligence, excused himself, paid up, 
and went off vowing vengeance under his breath. A few 
mornings later a little crowd of Examiner men on leaving 
work called into the Peters Bros, bar for a drink. They 
shook the dice to see who would pay for the refreshment. 
and one shake brought on another until they found them- 
selves shaking for the money equivalent of the drinks. The 
vengeful policeman outside heard the click of the dice, 
and the rattle of the coin, and saw his opportunity. He sent 
for the patrol wagon and sent the whole crowd to the City 
Prison. There they were quietly released, and the next day 
that policeman was at the instance of the Examiner trans- 
ferred to the fog district. Yet he was oaly following the 
rule which the paper now lays down as a correct one. That 
game of dice was an innocent one, and the spirit of the law 
was not aimed against it. The law against gaming with dice 
is designed to prevent professional games from being estab- 
lished all over the community. 

About two thousand hoboes have "blown into" town dur- 
ing the winter, and are now picking up an easy living from 
the gullible, who imagine that they are charitable when they 
give money to every man who asks it of them. These hoboes 
are doing a thriving business this winter. None of them 
are making less than two dollars per day, and in some 
cases their earnings run up to four or five. Work? Why, 
bless you, no job would tempt tnem. What's the use, when 
they can make an easy living asking passers-by for money? 
Down around Second and Third and Howard streets, and out 
in the neighborhood of Clay and Kearny streets, the lodging 
houses are full of them. No winter has ever seen such a 
gathering of them here. Humanitarians may shudder as 
much as they wish, but I still cling to the belief that a 
whipping post would be an excellent thing for these ruffians. 
Many a man is working his life out for less per day than 
one of these big burlies makes by hoodwinking the public. 

This a free country? No, indeed! Look at the case of Mr. 
Harry M. Prouse, the ex-soldier, who nailed himself up in a 
box to be shipped as freight to Chicago. A policeman 
discovered him, dug him out, and reduced the box to kindling 
wood. Call that freedom? It reminds me of the English 
sailor who was relating his mates at home his thrilling ex- 
periences in San Francisco, where he met some American 
Bailors, and was introduced to the seduction of steam 
beer. He wa telling with elaborate detail of their journey 
from one saloon to another, and how their jag began to 
assume gigantic, hilarious proportions, when one of his 
open-mouthed listeners interrupted him with: "But is it a 
free country, Bill?" "Free be blowed!" replied Bill in dis- 
gust. "I woke up in jail the same as I would in Liverpool!" 



I see that Harry F. Morris, bookkeeper for the Jake Rauer 
Collection Agency, has confessed to having cheated his 
employer, the professional money squeezer, out of a hundred 
odd dollars. Now, I don't generally encourage pilfering on 
the part of trusted clerks, but I do say that Harry F. Morris 
deserves all the money he got. It takes a thief to cheat 
a thief, and Jake Rauer is legitimate prey. Come to think 
of it, I don't know but Clerk Morris is due a vote of thanks 
from the burdened creditors of San Francisco — a gold medal 
perhaps as the only man who was ever able to get any 
money out of Jake Rauer. 



Social aclentists In some 

days ago In in g n f « foundation of 

building In Honolulu, of 1 is strata. A did- 

I i iiy know lo, la now given 

- and foreigners with >r mu- 

nition. Japanese laborers nine' mounds lo 

ing. and. opening them, brought to llgl I umulatlon 

of square, black bottles. Tie ipty, but bore on their 

blown in the sable giat whtcb were de 

i Iphered by Professor Alexander as Dntcb words. "Schie- 
dam schnapps" and "Geneva " were the most prominent 
words, and the scientists mentioned, after collaborating 
n their studies with Kamnalna Nome, decided that tho bot- 
tles w«rc onoe filled with rare old gin. Then it was found 
out that a King of Hawaii once lived on the spot in the days 
When the missionaries had first made Bibles and booze the 
ruling elements in the Paradise of the Pacific. The Mon- 
arch had spent a vast fortune in teaching his people to love 
and understand the use of both, and the strata of bottles 
had resulted. 

I am sure that I had not been drinking the other night 
when I passed the Donahue Fountain. "It seems about time 
to take a bath." said the bald-headed figure at the base of the 
fountain, straightening up ami trying to wipe the verdigris 
off his bronze arm. "I thought that there was a man coming 
around to scour us off," suggested a young statue at the 
top of the shebang. "Nay, nay." answered the old man, who 
is wise, "Mayor Schmitz's strong point is Music, not Art. 
The only way for us to get clean is to take the matter into 
our own hands, so here goes!" and the old fellow made a 
headlong dive into the slimy depths of the basin below. I 
left the whole group floundering and spattering around the 
shallow tank; but I don't see where they got much cleaner 
by contact with that gooey composite of orange peels and 
soot. Anyhow, they looked dirtier than ever this morning 
when I saw them again, hard at work in their respective 
places. 

"It was the cat." The new session of the trial of Mrs. 
Reeves-Atkinson, accused of maintaining a nuisance at 1815 
Sutter street, has brought forth the allegation on the part 
of the defense that cats were largely responsible for the 
hideous noises that kept the neighbors awake. Last week 
the parrot was the one that made all the noise in the sani- 
tarium, but realizing that a parrot couldn't create enough of 
an uproar to disturb the entire neighborhood, the poor cats 
have been dragged into it. Cats may be able to make con- 
siderable noise, but they couldn't furnish such exhibitions 
as caused the neighbors to wear dark glasses and keep the 
children off the street. 

There was an old bleary rapscallion 
Who went on a bat saturnalian. 
When arrested said he, 
"Keep your hands off of me, 

I'm a high Church E 

Piscopalian!" 

According to racing terms, Plunger Harry Lewis has 
"welshed" to the extent of % 2,100. I don't exactly know what 
a man does when he welshes, but I know that he makes his 
creditors very unhappy. After the manner of the plunger, 
Harry Lewis' began his operations on nothing, and closed 
them on less than nothing. The touts and the bookmakers 
are the losers — perhaps — but if I know the touts and the 
bookmakers, they will not be long in making up that $2,100 
and make a neat sum besides. For there is no lack on the 
track of small-headed youths who have money and are will- 
ing to throw away their coin in the empty hope of being 
known as "plungers" and "good spenders." 

"Coons, Coons, Coons," the Oakland police are caroling 
around another of those evangelical-criminal woman hunters 
with whom the Sleeping City seems to be infested of late. 
Edward L. Coons, who combines the professions of book- 
agent and evangelist, has been spending his evenings pleas- 
antly in terrifying girls on the street. He says that he is 
looking for a ghostly enamorata named Lenore — "whom the 
angels call Lenore" — and in the quest of the golden girl 
he has been stopping every maid and matron who has hap- 
pened to come his way. If he were not of the cloth he 
would be called a masher instead of an evangelist. I am 
glad that he is locked up. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




Now that Mrs. Meynell has ceased being the guest of San 
Francisco I will dare whisper what some of our clubladies 
have dared to whisper, namely: that Mrs. Meynell is a very 
distinguished essayist, but a durned poor lecturer. In fact, 
like many another literary celebrity the lady lacked the 
heaven-born gift of thinkinr on her feet, and I do not think 
that her lectures cleared her any great sum. One of her 
last talks — on the "Personality of Dickens," I believe — 
■was billed in the papers without any mention of admission 
fees, and the more frugal of the cultured flocked to the 
rooms of the Century Club hoping to get something for noth- 
ing, only to be met at the door by a stern demand for a 
dollar and a half. I don't believe that every one knows 
that Mrs. Meynell came to our Coast as the representative 
of an English paper, and I heard it discreetly hinted that 
she intends to roast the blue lights out of us when she gets 
on home territory. Poor San Francisco! Since Mr. Kipling 
libeled you in his "American Notes" you ought not. even for 
a moment, to have forgotten the abiding wrath of the liter- 
ary lion of either gender. Remember, dear, uncultured 
metropolis, that not all geniuses are willing to accept your 
starvation and give you in return the best of his art, as did 
that great and cheerful spirit, Robert Louis Stevenson. 
* * * 
It is not often one hears of romance entering the life of 
a humdrum school teacher, but rather an interesting story 
comes to me of Miss Keating, who for years taught school 
here. It was at the Horace Mann School that Miss Keating 
conceived a fondness for one of her most fractious pupils, 
Clarice Robinson, a handsome, willful girl. Clarice never 
finished school, but became an actress at the Alcazar. Miss 
Keating went every night to escort her home from the thea- 
tre, and was always her good angel. Clarice Robinson was 
not a great success as an actress, but her beauty always at- 
tracted the audience, and she married millionaire Reid of 
New York, who is President of a big trust and one of the 
great financiers of the day. Mrs. Reid, unlike most nouveaux 
riche, did not forget her old friend, and she sent for Miss 
Keating to go abroad with her for a year. Miss Keating 
procured a leave of absence and traveled on the continent 
for twelve months. For some technicality the School Board 
refused to allow her to come back into the department, and 
Mr. Reid wrote to thank them. He said he was happy that 
Miss Keating could remain with them. Now she lives in the 
Fifth Avenue home of the Reids, and she and Mrs. Reid 
study everything, go everywhere, and she will live happily 
for the rest of her days just because of her disinterested 
love for a pupil. 

• * • 

The other day I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Guy 
B. Barham of Los Angeles — Mr. Barham, the best dresser 
and best story-teller in the sunny South. 

During our little session Mr. Barham told me a story of 
high life, which I am going to repeat, because I don't think 
Mr. Barham will object — in fact, I have a faint recollection 
that he said I could publish it. 

It happened in Paris during one of Mr. Barham's sojourns 
there. Mrs. Bradley Martin arrived in Paris, and went to 
one of the swellest hotels, as befits a woman of her rank, 
wealth and station. Mrs. Bradley-Martin's neice was with 
her. 

Mrs. Bradley-Martin wished two suites of rooms on the 
second floor, one for herself and one for her neice. The 
maitre d'hotel, or whatever they call the head clerk in 
Paris, was very polite, and very sorry, but he said that 
there were only two front suites, one of which was vacant 
and the other occupied by Mr. Whitelaw Bradfleld, a Phila- 
delphia millionaire. 

Mrs. Bradley-Martin did not know Mr. Bradfleld, but she 
knew of him, and felt certain that if she would request him 
to he would give up his suite to her neice. The following 



notes passed back and forth: 

"Mrs. Bradley-Martin's compliments to Mr. Bradfleld: 
Mrs. Bradley-Martin wishes to know if Mr. Bradfleld will re- 
linquish his apartments on the second floor to her neice, as 
the only other apartments available are on the fourth 
floor." 

"Mr. Bradfield's compliments to Mrs. Bradley-Martin: 
Does Mrs. Bradley-Martin's neice drink?" 

"Mrs. Bradley-Martin's compliments to Mr. Bradfleld: 
Mrs. Bradley-Martin wishes to indignantly inform Mr. Brad- 
fleld that her neice does not drink." 

"Mr. Bradfield's compliments to Mrs. Bradley-Martin: 
Mr. Bradfleld is afraid that Mrs. Bradley-Martin's neice will 
have to take the fourth-floor suite." 

Well, that's the story as Mr. Barham told it to me. I've 
shown it to the editor, and he says there's no point to it. 
Maybe there isn't, but Mr. Barham's reputation as a story- 
teller ought to be a guarantee. Of course, there's a possi- 
bility that there's more to the story, and that Mr. Barham 
forgot to tell it to me — also a possibility that he did tell 
me, and that I've forgotten it. 
• • • 

The inhabitants of North Beach have been considerably 
diverted of late by the numerous flock of red and yellow 
balloons that have been sent on Sundays and holidays float- 
ing from the direction of Nob Hill over the bay toward 
Alcatraz. Those who are wise know that these balloons 
are (or were) the property of Dr. Harry Tevis, who has de- 
veloped quite a small craze for toy aeronautics, and is 
spending his pocket money and spare time sending up these 
big paper balloons. I was discussing the Doctor's fad with 
a man about town the other day, and he expressed himself 
in the following wise: 

"Those paper balloons must cost the Doctor a good deal 
of money, and if he is interested enough in aeronautics 
to put capital into it, it seems to me that he ought to do 
something worth while. The problem of aerial navigation 
would probably never have neared its solution had not Paris- 
ian gentlemen sportsmen of something less than Dr. Tevis's 
private fortune, pursued air-riding enthusiastically as a sport 
befitting kings. A few San Franciscans of Dr. Tevis' fortune 
might chip in and form an Aeronautic Club and teach Paris 
a few pointers about the navigation of the upper air." 

My friend's observations might have been just a bit "up 
in the air," but there was some meat in his argument 
Such of our sport-loving citizens who are complaining that 
polo and cross-country riding are too slow for them might 
try the air ship, if they are looking for their money's worth 
of excitement. 

• • • 

Mr. Louis Bruguiere, once the Mr. Harry Lehr of San 
Francisco, has found the wider social life of New York more 
suited to his tastes, and he is never coming back here to re- 
main if he can help himself. All the girls who used to know 
Mr. Bruguiere relied upon him to dress them, for there is 
no doubt that he had wonderful taste in dress. The poorer 
girls hated to come in contact with him, for to be well- 
dressed according to his ideas required a bank account like 
Mr. Pierpont Morgan's. He is going back to Harvard next 
year. 

• • • 

During Mrs. Kincaid's term as School Director, her favor- 
ite was Mr. Casserly, and her bete noir was Mr. Mark. Mrs. 
Kincaid and Mr. Casserly were extremely sympathetic be- 
cause they felt that they were in the same set, as it were, 
Mr. Casserly being married to the daughter of a millionaire 
and Mrs. Kincaid being backed by Mrs. Hearst. For weeks 
Mr. Casserly went to the school teachers and said: "For 
Heaven's sake, do you know anything nice about Mrs. 
Kincaid?" Usually the schoolma'am could think of some- 
thing amiable to say to a School Director. Then Mr. Cas- 
serly would answer: "Then, please get the most influential 
people you know in town to go to Mr. Schmitz and repeat 
what you tell me, for Mrs. Kincaid must go back on the 
School Board." 

It is said that because Mr. Casserly drowned his grief 
over Mrs. Kincaid's fall in the flowing bowl his resignation 
was requested. 

Because Mr. Mark, on the contrary, was not connected 



Februiry I, 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•3 



i millionaire even by marriage. Mrs. K 
a.i opportunity to tyrannize over him. A short I 
she went out of office Mr. Mark arose to make a atal 

which began: I think " 

Klncald said scornfully: You think' Whal rliiht 
have you to think?" 

Now. whenever Mr. Mark's friends meet him on 
they atop him, nnd ask: "What right have you to think?" 
• • • 

One of the numerous lily the claimants has been lost sight 
of In the rush. She was the original "common law," or no 
law. wife. In 1877, a variety actress who sailed under 
the stage name of Nellie Fikniin, brought suit against Mr. 
Thomas H. Blythe for divorce. In this claim Bh 
sisted by one "John Jack," a variety performer, who was sup- 
posed to be the real husband of the woman. She produced 
a "contract marriage," which Blythe proved to be a forgery. 
Blythe was a gay old gentleman, and susceptible to the 
wiles of women. Pioneer millionaires were seldom free 
from entanglements and contract marriages grew as thick 
as hops In the good old days. Crittenden was assassinated 
by Laura D. Fair; Mrs. E. Edwards sued for Heating's for- 
tune; Sarah Althea Hill sued the late Senator Sharon on a 
"contract marriage," or something of the kind, and the 
variety actress, Sallie Hinckley, brought a similar suit 
against the estate of a dead millionaire. Senator Fair, it Is 
believed, became so cautious that he employed a young man 
as chaperon. Yet that did not save him. "Lucky" Baldwin 
took no such precautions. He was sued by several of his 
cast-off Jebezels, and one of tie more vindictive shot him. 
But he survived these trials, and has reformed, but only 
because of old age, it is believed. 
* * • 

The Filipino boys are making great strides in the mastery 
of the English language, as you may see by the letter below, 
which just came to a returned volunteer who made friends 
in the islands. 

"My dear 

"I. am very glad to hear from you are well and I. am joy 
received any letter from yours and when you came bake and 
see me again. 

"And I. hope to yours working in Salon, and I. am pretty 
well Mary my Mother Father and Sister send much remem- 
ber to yours and Helena is deat Now about three Months 
ago. I. have many friends ladies Americ- and girls teacher 
in the Schools, well Mr. Chiga is very well now in the rear 
of my house live have wife fllipino. work in the Quarter 
Master, and Mr Charles Fallon is very teacher in the Negros 
Islands. Anita took Japanese Now Mary tell you now give 
her some present from America Camera of Photogrape she 
like. 

"I. will perhape to see yours in Manila I. send much 
Memories to all Mr Daly Joshtone Anderson Fisher and Len- 
hart Mr. terarabomdie 

"I. am very glad to write me soon p d q no sabe write in- 
glish buen you come to Manila you bring Americand Biccicle 
is very good for all fllipinos boys like that. 
good hie 
your friends poor 

Ramon Mercado." 



Pyrography Outfits 

And all kinds of Artists' materials, Paints, Brushes, Canvas 
Studies and Skins and Wood to burn. We are agents for 
Winsor and Newton, makers of the best Artists' Materials 
in the world. Come to Headquarters for everything wanted 
in the Artists' Material line. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 
Market street. 



If you hear a man complaining about a bad head the 

next morning you may be sure that it was some other whisky 
than Argonaut that he drank the night before. Argonaut 
never leaves any bad effects, and its bouquet and flavor are 
delightful. It is the regular tipple of the discriminating. 
E. Martin & Co., 54 First street, 'Sole agents for the TJ. S. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, Sim Francisco. 



Pears' 

To keep the skin clean 
is to wash the execrations 
from it off ; the skin takes 
care of itself inside, if not 
blocked outside. 

To wash it often and 
clean, without doing any 
sort of violence to it re- 
quires a most gentle soap, 
a soap with no free alkali 
in it. 

Pears', the soap that 
clears but not excoriates. 

Sold all over the world. 




Studebaker, 



This man is fav- 
ored with two of 
the greatest bles- 
sings that can be 
bestowed — one 
on the seat be- 
side him, the 
other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

MARKET and TENTH STS. 



R^Uil\©Ll"t [Brut] 

CHAMPAGNE 

Established in 1729 
RUINART pere et fils, RHEIMS, France 
HILBERT BROS., 213-215 market street 

AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 
V. W. GASKBLL, Special Aeent. 



— — Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 
Syrup" for your children while teething. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Phelan Bids. Tel Main 5387 San Francisco, Gal, 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




What a lucky thing it is that Ash Wednesday is now so 
near at hand! Did the ante-Lenten season last a little 
longer the pretty maidens of society would not have a foot 
to stand upon, much less to walk. We never before had such 
a continuous list of dances: the iinal Friday Fortnightly last 
night, the Chrysanthemums to-night, the second Greeaway 
ball on Monday, followed by those of Mrs. Will Crocker, 
Mrs. Lester, Miss Bessie Huntington (which is to be in honor 
of Miss Hazel Noonan and Miss Louise Redington), the Pre- 
sidio hop, the last La Jeunesse, Mrs. Athearn Folger's cotil- 
lion, and the Mardi Gras. So much for their "tootsies," but 
what can be said of their digestive powers? — for luncheons 
seem to increase and multiply as the days go by. This week 
they have almost become a fad. 

Mrs. George Gibbs has been an untiring hostess this win- 
ter in the way of teas, luncheons and dinners, and she too 
gave a married ladies' luncheon on Tuesday which was one 
of the prettiest of her parties so far. She has up to the 
present withstood all the coaxings bestowed upon her to 
give a dance, but it is just possible she will do so after 
Lent. Mrs. Will Hinckly Taylor's green and white luncheon, 
which she gave at her mother's. Mrs. Kittle's, on Tuesday 
last, was a very dainty affair, her guests numbering ten. 
Captain and Mrs. Baily were the guests of honor at Mrs. 
Monti Wilson's dinner on Tuesday, and the dinner given 
by Mrs. Mullins the same evening was for the bridal party 
which will appear at her daughter Maud's wedding next 
week, and included Miss Leontine Blakeman, who will be 
maid of honor, the Misses O'Connor, Gertrude Van Wyck, 
Charlotte Ellinwood, Mary Polhemus, Alida Gnirareldi, and 
Grace Spreckels, who are to officiate as bridesmaids; Dr. 
C. C. Clark, the groom's best man, and his ushers, Lieuten- 
ant Brewer, Dr. McVean, and Messrs. Knox Maddox, Thos. 
Binney, Rudolph Hart, and B. C. Carroll — and the pros- 
pective bride and groom, of course. 

Mrs. W. J. Dutton's green luncheon on Wednesday was in 
honor of the fair bride-elect, Miss Maud Mullins. There were 
hn.een guests, all young ladies, with the exception of two 
matrons. 

Wednesday evening was ladies' night at the Olympic 
Club, when an exhibition of boxing was the chief thing 
on the programme; Bishop and Mrs. Nichols also gave their 
annual reception at the Occidental Hotel, but the chief 
event was the bal poudre at Cotillion Hall, which was pre- 
ceded by several dinners, the largest of which took place 
at the Brigham's, the young ladies of the house being the 
promoters of that dance. Thursday was filled with events. 
There were three luncheons, at one of which Miss Mabel 
Hogg was hostess, at another Miss Leontine Blakeman, 
whose guest of honor was Miss Maud Mullins, and Mrs. 
Hyde-Smith gave the third of her series which was a good- 
bye to her sister, Mrs. Garceau. 

The Women's Auxiliary of the Society of California Pio- 
neers will hold their first annual assembly at Pioneer Hall 
this afternoon to celebrate the anniversary of the the ceding, 
by Mexico, of California to the United States. 

Life is one "grand, sweet song" at Del Monte at present. 
People who leave our chilly climate and go down there 
express surprise that such a change can be formed at so 
short a distance from us. 

Miss Margaret Salisbury and Miss Azalea Keyes -united 
in giving a tea at Mrs. Salisbury's on Thursday afternoon; 
Miss Grace Whitney's tea at the Roanoke, where she and 
Mrs. Whitney are domiciled for the winter, was the second 
of the series, the first last week having had Miss Kate 
Herrin as gnest of honor. Mrs. W. V. Huntington and her 
daughters were at home on Thursday and will be again next 
week. Yesterday, Mrs. Chauncey Winslow gave one of her 
pretty luncheons; Mrs. and Miss Ellinwood gave the second 
and last of their at homes. Miss Daisy Van Ness's tea in 
the a.ftemnAn was in honor of Miss Georgina Jones, and Mrs. 



W. H. Stinson also gave a pretty tea. In the evening the 
Friday Fortnightlies had their last cotillion, which was led 
by Mrs. Will Taylor. 

This is to be another day of teas, of which the givers will 
include Mrs. and Miss Nuttall, who will receive their friends 
at Century Hall, Mrs. Center and Miss Bessie at their home 
on Vallejo street, Mrs. W. S. Wood, whose tea will be in 
honor of her daughter, Mrs. C. F. Welty, nee Wood, who is 
here from Ohio on a visit to her parents; and one at the Pre- 
sidio, which will be given by Mrs. Rawles, wife of the Post 
Commander, Colonel J. B. Rawles, who is also in temporary 
command of this Department during the absence in Wash- 
ington, D. C, of General Young. 

Mrs. Bowie-Detrick opens next week as a luncheon hostess 
on Monday; Mrs. Alfred Tubbs will appear in the same role 
on Tuesday, and in the afternoon Mrs. Woithington Ames 
gives a tea in honor of her sister, Miss Preston; Mrs. Eugene 
Lent will be a luncheon hostess on Thursday. Mrs. E. F. 
Preston's recent yellow luncheon in the Palace Grill is 
spoken of as having been one of the prettiest of the season; 
there were ten guests, chief of whom was Mrs. B. C. Howard. 
Miss Margaret Simpson will join the large number of 
this season's buds next Saturday, when her mother, Mrs. 
John Simpson, will give an at home, her first this winter. 
The Doctor's Daughters were lucky in having such clear 
skies for their benefit ball game last Saturday, but it was 
bitter cold, and few of the society folk had the courage to 
see it out. Possibly, too, those who intended appearing at 
the Scott-Spear wedding in the evening feared red noses 
and red ears would result from the icy air, and therefore 
made themselves scarce. 

Miss Mary Augusta Gibbons and Mr. W. D. Evans were 
very quietly married on Sunday afternoon at Christ Church, 
Alameda, by the Rev. T. J. Lacey, and on Monday departed 
for Alaska, where the groom is filling an official position in 
the service of Uncle Sam. 

Tuesday, February 11th, is the date set for the wedding 
of Miss Phoebe Painter and Dr. Gardner P;.nd, which will 
take place at the First Congregational Church at nine p. m., 
and will be followed by a family reception at the residence 
of Mrs. Kate Yeamans on Baker street. Miss Lizzie Painter 
will officiate as her sister's maid of honor, and the Misses 
Gcorgie Spieker, Azalea Keyes, Paula Wolff, Alice Wilkins, 
and Lillian Sandman are to fill the roles of bridesmaids. 
>The groom is to have the assistance of two best men — his 
brother James and Mr. Harold Ebright — to launch him on 
the sea of matrimony, and the Reverends G. C. Adam's and 
W. C. Pond are to unite in tying the nuptial knot. 

With the near approach of Lent, cards, which during Janu- 
ary rather took a back seat, are again coming to the front, 
they being regarded as a harmless way of passing the pene- 
tential period. The first party given this week was by Mrs. 
L. L. Dorr on Tuesday, when her guests numbered sixty, 
who united in pronouncing it a most delightful affair. Mrs. 
Alfred Spreckels was a card hostess on Wednesday, and 
Mrs. C. W. Clarke and Mrs. Ed Dimond each had sixty guests 
at their euchre parties on Thursday. Mrs. W. H. Morrow 
also gave a euchre party that afternoon. Mrs. David Bix- 
ler's card party this afternoon will be an exceedingly large 
one, and Miss Susie Earle's card party is named for Satur- 
day next at her home on Clay street. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin was proof against all the entreaties 
of her friends to remain in town, and departed on a two 
weeks' trip south on Monday last. The truth is she has been 
so untiringly filling the duties of a society hostess, and so 
unceasingly on the go all winter that she feels the need of 
rest, for though the spirit is willing the flesh is weak, and 
therefore she has gone to Los Angeles to recuperate if she 
will be allowed to do so. 

Miss Mabel Cluff has returned from her visit East. Mrs. 
Easton is one of the arrivals of the week, from her trip to 
Gotham. Captain and Mrs. Ren Smedburg have left the 
Knickerbocker and returned to the parental roof-tree on 
Larkin street, where there is now room and to spare, for 
Captain and Mrs. Mclvor have departed for their Northern 
station, and Miss Cora gone East to spend the winter. Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Griffin will pass the Lenten season in South- 
ern California. Miss Cornelia Scott left for her home In St 



February 1, 1902 



•AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER 



15 



Louis on Monday last. aft.-i a loutt ami im 

- relatives in California. I 
log many visitors to Southern California tti 
died at Pasadena are the wife and daughter of V 
E. Stone, manager of the Associate! Press, who 
visit San Francisco some time this month At H Hands 
quite a gathering of wealthy New Yorkers ar<> liaski:it 
sunshine of that favored region. 

The fine weather in Marin County is attracting m u 
people. The following Is a list of the arrivals dnrli 
past week at Hotel Rafael: Dr. W. Hupper. Miss A S 
lng. Mr. Emlle A. Brugulere. Mr. I.. A. Williams. Mr. George 
W Haas. Mr. E. E. Staite. Mrs. I.. W. Moffat). Mr. H 

Dr. O. \V. Slchel, Mr. W. F. Rogers, Mr. W. H. Simp- 
son, Mrs. Sidney Starr. Mrs. Z. .1. Hatch. Mr. William Kelly. 
Miss Livingstone. Mr. Allen Wallace, Mr. E. J. Hlgglne 
Tucker. Mr. M. C. Osborn, Mr. I.. Stonebrink, Mr. W. H. 
Clarke, Mr. H. C. Agnews, Mr. and Mrs. William C 
Miss Ruth Casey, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Wright. 

Mrs. Carroll Cook and the Misses Cook gave a very suc- 
cessful tea Saturday afternoon at the corner of Broadway 
and Scott street. In spite of the cold, raw weather the at- 
tendance was large. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carolan are hack from the East. Mr. 
Carolan has some interesting experiences to tell of his hunt- 
ing in the Genessee Valley. While riding with the Cheney ' 
Hunt Club he suffered a severe fall from a horse, but he is 
now almost recovered from his injuries. 

Mr. Parsons arrived with Prince PouiatowsKi this week 
and has just learned about the story circulated in an even- 
ing paper to the effect that he was engaged to a serving 
maid employed by his friend. Mr. Parsons declares that the 
story is utterly unfounded. 



A UNIQUE STUDIO. 



Just opposite the Hotel Arlington, Santa Barbara, is one 
of the prettiest studios in California, occupied by Miss 
Wheelan. Miss Wheelan is a combination of painter and 
sculptor, and does her work on leather. Leather as a means of 
decoration has come greatly into vogue during the past few 
years, and Miss Wheelan's artistic aptitude has enabled her 
to distinguish herself in this line of work. The designs she 
creates are novel and unique, surpassing in beauty any of 
the work usually seen in stores. None of it is of the stereo- 
typed variety. Raised leather is now being used for various 
purposes, making beautiful album covers, purses, photo- 
graphic mounts, card cases, table covers, sofa cushions, 
screens, and many other useful and novel articles. A pair 
of portieres of this material is an adornment to any home. 
Miss Wheelan also does beautiful work in embossed leather 
work in natural colors. 



Trunks and Valises. 

Another carload of Trunks, Valises, Dress Suit Cases, 
Traveling Sets at our famous carload prices. All kinds of 
leather goods in this department lettered in gold letters free 
of charge. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



The Earlcourt, 1011 Pine street, is the smallest and 

most select hotel in San Francisco. In spite of its size 
a fortune was spent on it. There are no single rooms, every- 
thing being arranged in suites, with baths attached, and 
every suite is differently furnished. Elegance and luxury 
mark everything about the house. The grill is one of the 
leading features, being the best in town. 



The freshest fruits and vegetables may always be 

found at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-45-46 California 
Market. Everything high-class. 



In spite of the fact that 1893 was one of the best 

vintage years ever known among wine men, Doyen Cham- 
pagne, '93, sells for the price of ordinary wine. 



There is only one reason why you shouldn't drink Jesse 

Moore "AA" Whiskey— that's because you have signed the pledge. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country. Tel. Main 1042. 



D' 



\ >kin 0fl Ke«ut> I* a Joy Forever. 

i U. I. Mtl\ QOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAOICAL HI vt III II k. 



Moth I'M.!..*, fiaih nnr) RUd J'U- 



!-r. I \. V>\ r. - >i<l U> ft lady <>f Hip 

imni i"ii ' * i«iti< nl : "Ai ronladlM 
will hn Uiem. I raoommend '(j<nir- 

;ni 1- ' m mil' n« Hip Irn-t harmful ol 

nil iheali tiv" I'ur Aato 

by nil tlruinrlatn and PUMfSOOdl 

In l lie United State*. CnnaUa* 

tun! I .iin>i'« . 




FERO. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
.T7 Great Jones utreet, N*. V. 



f 



n 



Original 



Valentines 



Laden with Sentiment, 
Or Gay with Frivolity. 

No Lace Papzr. 
Various Prices from SO 
cents to 



10c. 



Elder and Shepard, 

238 POST STBEET. 

I — 



J 



Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 

LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

533 MARKET STREET. 




A Party of Locomobi lists Starting for a Day's Outing. 



Model to be seen at The Salesroom of the Locomobile Co. of 
the Pacific, 1 622 to 1628 Market St. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




It must be very unpleasant, after hav- 
Benevolence but ing attained a competency from the 
Illy Requited. management of a mining property to 
be continually on the defensive from 
attacks such as those which are anuually made upon 
Mr. H. C. Callahan, ex-Superintendent of the Lake View 
Consols Company. After a few years' service with this 
company, Mr. Callahan was able to retire with a fortune 
estimated all the way up in six figures according to the feel- 
ings of the various writers on the press who have touched 
upon the unrivaled success which attended this Californian 
engineer during a comparatively brief career in Westralia. 
For the third time he has, according to his own account, been 
forced to contradict the statement, made regularly as each 
annual meeting occurs, by the chairman, such as, to quote 
Mr. Callahan, "though a large amount of development work 
has been done, and is being done, we have not yet recovered 
from the fearful days of the manager who gutted the mine 
and practically did no development work at all." The annual 
repetition of this statement is naturally enough offensive to 
the former Superintendent, and he appears in print "for 
the third time," as he says, to nail this "inaccuracy to the 
counter." He asserts that he developed the mine to the 
500 level, and opened out 300,000 tons of ore valued at an 
ounce of gold per ton, and denies that he gutted the mine. 
He also proved to his satisfaction that the ore bodies in this 
mine are shaped like a funnel with the broader end above, 
narrowing down to smaller dimensions with decreasing 
values. This is a good enough tip for an operator in the 
stock of this company if he knows anything about market 
manipulation, and the hint should prove of value for the 
future action in the market, suggesting a purchase of stock 
upon the news of another strike of ore, and a sale short, 
when its extraction begins. Mr. Callahan claims that his 
"misfortune was to have found one of the richest bonanzas 
and to have given it to the shareholders who were entitled 
to receive it." If this was not a misfortune it was certainly 
a mistake, proving that his education as a mine superin- 
tendent in California was badly neglected. He would not 
have lasted long here had he been guilty of such an error 
as to consider shareholders before the men who put him in 
his position. The large fortunes of to-day would not be in 
existence had mistakes of this kind taken place when a 
plain ordinary shareholder has only done his duty and has 
passed beyond the pale of consideration after pungling up 
the cost of finding and extracting a bonanza deposit. If Mr. 
H. C. Callahan continues to buck up against misfortunes of 
the kind, should he go back into harness again, he will 
make the mistake of his life, and might end his days in the 
poorhouse. A superintendent of a bonanza mine standing in 
with the shareholders! Fancy the outrage! No wonder 
indeed, the memory of such an offender provokes retalia- 
tion every time the directors get a chance to haul him over 
the coals. That Callahan escaped with a fortune should be 
to him a source of everlasting congratulation. His monthly 
draw-down would be curtailed in pretty short order had he 
permitted his charitable feelings to have got the better of 
his judgment on thfs side of the earth. 

It is not a particularly opportune 

Misfortune Follows moment for outside flotations on 

the Old Alaska Mine, the London market, now that the 

Kaifir circus has opened up again 
in great shape. This, however, has not been taken into con- 
sideration by some people, judging from the announcement 
by the Petroleum oil fields of Kern County, who have gone 
to the County under the above title, inviting a subscription 
of $30,000 for tha California lay-out. Leaving the value of 
this property ont'.of the Question, the situation here is not 
such as to prove much of an inducement for investors in this 
concern should they propose to go into the investment 
with their eyes open, as they are likely to do after the bit- 



ter experiences of the past in this part of the world. The 
directors of the London and California Gold Mining and 
Milling Company, the successor to the innumerable failures 
which have followed one concern after another organized 
to handle the old and unlucky Alaska mine and its exten- 
sions in Sierra County, are, it is said, trying now to raise 
money on debentures and are also proposing a reconstruc- 
tion. A contemporary, evidently well posted on the true 
character of this enterprise, says: "Shareholders will be 
wise if they go into liquidation a:id cut their losses short for 
the whole thing has been more of a share peddling trans- 
action than a mining operation." Had the investors in this 
concern taken the advice given them in the first instance 
in the News Letter, their losses would not have run up to 
$50,000, where they now stand. They might as well throw 
their money into the ocean as to attempt to work these 
properties as it is now proposed. The Alaska mine in itself 
is a veritable "hoodoo," and the list of its misfortunes since 
work first began from fire, water and mismanagement would 
furnish material for many an interesting chapter. The day 
may come when the fortunes of this property will change, 
but it will never be under a management such as those 
which have controlled its destinies up to this date. 

Lower prices for Con.-Cal.-Virginia 
The Pine-St. Market, stock had the effect of working 
. values lower along the entire list. 

A smaller yield of high-grade ore for the past week brought 
sellers into the market, and this accounts for the break. 
With ore available at other points in this mine it is not 
likely that the rate of extraction will fall much lower, 
with every likelihood that it will show improvement in point 
of values before long when stoping begins above the 1950. 
The drill on the Brunswick lode is giving satisfaction, and 
has already cut some ore streaks in working its way down 
to a depth of 110 feet, where it stood on Wednesday last. 
It is the intention of the management to put three shifts at 
work very soon, when sinking will be carried on at the rate 
of thirty feet per day. The other North-end stocks outside 
of Con.-Cal.-Virginia, firmed up toward the close, Ophir 
particularly showing strength. As the 2150 level of Con.- 
Cal.-Virginia is now out to the Ophir line, it is likely that a 
joint cross-cut will be started east before long. Silver 
Hill is quoted at an advance, on an improvement in the mine 
which is said to look remarkably well just now. There 
are some large outside holders of this stock who are now 
in a position to clean up a handsome profit upon their origi- 
nal investment. 

The drop in the price of Alaska Packers 
The Local and Giant Powder stocks was the only 
Stock Market, features in the local security market dur- 
ing the week. There is nothing unnatu- 
ral in the decline of the former stock, and the statement 
which got abroad that the Giant people were short to the 
extent of $7,000 of the amount necessary to cover the last 
dividend paid, probably brought out sellers, lowering the 
price. It is now getting on to the date fixed for the payment 
of the balance due on the Market-street deal, and the gos- 
sips on the street are again discussing the possibilities of 
another forfeiture of a deposit as the precursor of ultimate 
failure to pay up the balance due. There is a large amount 
at stake, it is true, and it is likely that ao effort will be 
spared to bring the negotiations to a successful issue if it 
is at all possible. Gas stocks continue quiet with a sud- 
den subsidence of talk about combinations. That oil will 
cut more of a figure than coal in the future manufacture of 
gas seems certain in view of the enlarged plants projected 
by one and another of the companies. The bonds of the Bay 
Counties Power are gradually hardening as the company 
extends its lines. Prices elsewhere are steady with a 
comparatively light movement in the market for all classes 
of securities. 

The development work carried 

South-end Constocks on so successfully for months 

are Looming Up. past by the Silver Hill Mining 

Company has opened up a new 

field of exploration by the Justice Company adjoining. The 

south line of the Justice is the north line of Silver Hill, 

and the ore body now being opened up in the latter has 

gained considerable strength as the ore opens out toward 



r «bruary 1, 1902 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



this line of demnrkatton bi-twi-^n the two companion The 
Juellcc poople now contemplate commencing work In thin 

u of their ground, believing that they will be .1 
do as well as the neighboring property, which Is not only 

istalnlng, but Is rolling up n neat little mirplui 
month In the treasury. It Is this which has 
to the market for Justice stock this » 

e> 

The California Commercial Guarantee Company h is just 
Issued a pamphlet setting forth a few farts, an. I no 01 
read the little book without being Impressed by t;. 
ment the company has made since Its beginning less than 
a year ago. The booklet contains some twenty letters mit- 
ten by such firms as Frank Pelicano & Co., Lundberg i 
Adolph Liebmann. Newman & Uvison. S. P. News I 
Overland Monthly. American Sponge Compajy, Cox Seed 
Co., Ramsey & Son. the White Star Laundry, and many 
others, stating that, as a guarantee for the collection of 
bad bills and the furnishing of legal advice and protection 
the California Commercial is a gilt-edged concern. With 
such a consulting attorney as Mr. Samuel M. Shortridge 
behind them, the Company is admirably sound legally. It 
Is worthy of mention that the California Commercial lias 
been commissioned to collect bad bills from nearly every 
so-called "collection agency" in the city. 



Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from Janu- 
ary 21st to January 27th, 1902. 

SHARKS BAKGE OF GROSS 

STOCKS. SOLD PRICES SALES. 

Apollo „ WO S 20 ® 100 

JJe»r FlM l.lix) 8 ® CM 34 

Cal lornla Standard 2.500 23 ® 30 655 

Four Oil 600 51 @ 52 310 

Banford 8 89 I (390 W 717 

Home Oh 1,130 2 60 O 2 70 4,<80 

Independence 1.000 08 @ .. 80 

Junullun 150 19 ® 28 

Petroleum Center 41,320 6 @ 7 2,611 

Reed crude OU , .. 2.350 38 @ 39 '.ill 

Senator 100 67 @ ■■ 67 

Shamrock 5U0 50 ® -■ 250 

Superior ; 1,600 5 ® .. 75 

Thirty Three 50 7 50 ® 876 

Tollee 200 30 @ ■■ 60 

"Wolveiine 100 50 ® .. 50 

Bovereien 40 20 ® 8 

Oil City Petroleum 1,700 21 ® .. 357 

Occidental oi West Vireinla 1,250 20 ® 21 155 

Lion 4,650 ^ 8 ® 362 

Ster.ine 1,450 115 ® I 20 1.702 

Monarch of Arizona 1,900 19 @ 21 3*1 

Monte Cristo 200 1 45 (3 1 50 294 

64,398 ?14,168 

Mr. George E. Lyon, who for so many years brought his 
name prominently before the public by his artistic illustra- 
tions in the Chronicle and Examiner, has given up art work 
and has branched out as a florist. He has opened a beautiful 
establishment at 211 Sutter street, which is a marvel of 
beauty and taste. 



The Locomobile Company of America, 1622 Market street, 
has received a carload of Locomobiles, including several of 
the new model touring cars, style A. This carriage was the 
sensation of the recent New York automobile show, and is 
designed for long trips. 



One of the old landmarks of the town disappeared 

when the Original Vienna Bakery and Restaurant, 205 
Kearny street, was removed. It closed yesterday, and re- 
opened this morning at 133-135 O'Farrell street, where ele- 
gant new quarters have been fitted up for It. Mr. F. B. 
Galindo, who has had charge of the Vienna for the past three 
years has made it the leading restaurant in town. He has 
done this by maintaining the highest standard of excellence, 
and catering to the most exclusive class. The same excel- 
lence will mark its career at Its new quarters. Mr. Galindo 
will be glad to see all of his old patrons at the new head- 
quarters. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
with which cook can please all. 



Lunch and dinner, 50 cents, at Felix's Rotisserie. 537 California street, be. 
low Kearny: Sunday dinner, 75o. Best French restaurant in town 



Stops the Cough and Works Off the Cold. 

laxative Bromo-Quinine Tablets cure a cold in one day. No Cu re, No Pay 
price 25 cents. 



R«E 






■■■.j.^SSlgi 



w? 



THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS 
A FULL QUART OF FINE OLD VIRGINIA RYE. THOROUGHLY 
AGED IN WOOD. BY THE ADDITION OF HONEY AND 
HOREHOUND ITS MELLOWNESS .TONE ANO MEDICINAL 
050PERTIES HAVE BEEN MATERIALLY ENHANCED.AS A TOMIC. 
STIMULANTANDGENEHALIHVIGORATOR.it IS UNSURPASSED. 



SOLD IN GLASS ONLY- 



-'::■ r ^W^,': : 



•ONE FULL QUART- 



J- O. Harron, Pres.. 

THos. Rickard, 1st. 

Vice-President 



Formerly of 
Parke & Lacy Co. 



f A. J. McCone, 2nd. Vice 
-, President. Of 

I Fulton Fd'y. Virginia City 



HARRON, RICKARD G> McCONE, 



21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

riming riachinery 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 



and 
Supplies 



James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Geo. H. Fuller Desk Co. 



REMOVAL SALE 



We offer our im- 
mense stock of OFFICE 
FURNITURE at greatly 
reduced prices until 
February 1st. 

638-640 niSSION ST. 



United States Cartridge Co. 




Makers of the.. 



Popular " U. S." 



Try them and you will take no other. 



Brand of Cartridges 



PAFF ROYAI ^ or ' fourth and Market streets, San Francisco. Try our 
UHTL nUIHL apecial brew steam and lager beer, 5 cents. Overcoats and 
valises checked free. 

WANTED— Piano Pupils. Teacher of Stuttgart system. Residence or 
home. Hi. DO an hour. Miss Bhodt, 1.j23c H-.ward. Piano for sale cheap, 

English, English Literature, and Elocution. l'»8% Hayes Street. Coach- 
ing done, children's classes on Saturday, Adults of neglected education 
a specialty. Prices reasonable. Hours y to 4. 



- — Your medicine chest is incomplete if it is. not stocked with 
Jesse Moore "AA" "Whiskey. 



CfAprp Books Photographs, etc. Catalogue, with samples. 
3WAHVL sealed letter post, G. ARTHUR, 6 Rue PEcluse, Paris. 



. 8L00 



18 



6AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 







murance 







The twenty-sixth annual meeting of the Fire Underwriters' 
Association of the Pacific will be held in the Assembly Room 
of the Association, 303 California street, San Francisco, Cal., 
commencing Thursday, February 20, 1902, at 10 a. m„ and 
concluding with a banquet on Friday evening, February 
21, 1902. Notice of time and place will be given by dinner 
committee. A preliminary meeting will be held in the 
Assembly Room on Wednesday, preceding the Annual Meet- 
ing at 2 p. m., for the approval of minutes and transaction 
of such other business as may be properly presented, in 
this way giving fully two days for the reading of papers. 

* * * 

Mr. George H. Mendell, Jr., has been appointed Assistant- 
Secretary of the Fireman's Fund. Mr. Mendell has been con- 
nected with the company for a long time, more recently as 
Special Agent. 

* * * 

The Pacific Underwriters, composed of the Firemans 
Fund and the Home Fire and Marine, which will issue joint 
policies, have placed the business of the State in the McNear 
agency, Mr. Willard O. Wayman, manager. 

* * * 

Mr. W. J. Landers is on a southern trip. 

* * * 

Mr. J. D. Maxwell is convalescent, and on the street again. 

* * * 

The Metropolitan Life's main offices are now in the Hay- 
wards building, and manager George H. Gaston is just as 
democratic as though he did not occupy the largest life in- 
surance offices in the State. 

* * * 

The News Letter in a previous number called attention to 
the defalcation of the Supreme Treasurer, Mr. C. D. Thomp- 
son, who got away with the trifling amount of some three 
figures. It is now reported that the "Supreme Tent" is suing 
the Port Huron Savings Bank for $50,000. This would indi- 
cate that the Fidelity and Casualty Company and the 
National Surety Company repudiate the claim made against 
it as Thompson's bondsmen, the companies alleging as a 
defense that the officers of the Maccabees violated their 
warrantee in the application by allowing Thompson to draw 
funds on his own signature instead of on cheques signed by 
two other supreme olUcers. This shows the supreme careless- 
ness with which these supreme officers conduct ^eir 
supreme business, and it is to be supremely hoped that they 
will not recover a supreme dollar. Their supreme effrontery 
in doing the class of business they are engaged in is supreme 

gall. 

* * * 

Mr. Frederick Frelinghuysen has been elected to succeed 
the venerable Amyi Dodd as President of the Mutual Bene- 
fit Life. Mr. Dodd was President for twenty years, and will 
continue to give his services to the company as General 
Counsel and Director. 

* * * 

Steam boiler insurance written in California for 1901 
amounts in premiums to $18,343, with loss of $1,032. The 
Hartford Steam Boiler wrote $12,872, with losses of $34.00. 
(This probably includes the re-insurance of the business of 
the Pacific Surety Company.) 

* * * 

In Burglary Insurance the total premiums written 
amounted to $7,437 — losses $432. There are only two com- 
panies writing burglary business in California, the Fidlity 
and Casualty and the United States Fidelity and Guarantee. 
Title insurance premiums for 1901, in the State (for the 
two companies writing it are both California corporations) 

were $53,419— losses $547. 

* * * 

Accident premiums written in California for 1901 amount 
to $364,090— losses paid $129,927. The Pacific Mutual heads 
the list with $123,171— losses $65,653. 



Employers Liability written in California for 1901 amount 
to in premiums $219,352 — losses $54,837. The Employers 
Liability tops the list with $76,772 in premiums and $10,728 
in losses. 

* * » 

Fidelity and Surety premiums written in California for 
1901 amount to $209,000— losses $74,435. Fidelity and De- 
posit premiums foot up $56,442 — losses, $29,547. 

* * * 

Plate Glass premiums in California for the year amount to 
$28,063, with losses paid of $11,220. The list is headed by 
the New York Plate Glass with $6,452— income losses $3,201. 

* * * 

In Credit Insurance in this State the American Credit 
Indemnity wrote last year $24,258 in premiums and paid 
$905 for claims. The Ocean wrote $12,625 and lost $2,385. 

* * * 

In special health insurance the Travelers wrote during the 
year in premiums $11,869, and paid for claims $473. The 
Maryland Casualty wrote $64 in premiums and paid in claims 
$25. 

* * * 

The assessment epidemic of failures seems now to be at- 
tacking those most able financiers, the Hebrews. The 
B'rith Abraham, a fraternal association, finds itself about 
$26,000 short, and it has called on the New York Department 
of Insurance to help find out where it got to and who got it. 

* * * 

Mr. Henry J. Remmund, ex-Insurance Commissioner of 
Ohio, and until recently an officer of the Mutual Reserve 
Fund, has sued it for $60,000, which he claims due him as 
commissions. The "church militant" is now joined with 
an ex-insurance commissioner in backing the decrepit Mu- 
tual Reserve, and the future result will be, if possible, worse 
than the bad present for the Reserve. 

* * • 

The Masonic Mutual Benefit Association of Mass. has 
claims of $82,000 and assets of $8,000. 

* * * 

The largest single cheque ever drawn in payment of life 
insurance policy has just been received by the executors ot 
the estate of Frank H. Pearey of Minneapolis. The cheque 
was for a million, and was paid by the Mutual Life. 



A man who wears spotted, stained or baggy clothing 

proclaims the fact that he does not know of the existence 
of Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works. 127 Stockton 
street. They also clean gloves, neckties, laces, curtains, 
tapestries, and all such articles. Goods are sent back loqk- 
ing like new. Promptness is one of their mottoes. 



Flavored and seasoned in wood, rich and elegant with the 

best materials used by distillers, it is no wonder that Jesse Moore 
Is the leading whiskey In the world. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of works-Gold Hill, Storey County. Nevada. Principal pluce 
ol business. Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice la hereby riven that a mectinir of the Board of Trustees of this 
Company, held on the 8tli diy of January, 1902, an assostmrnl (No. 10) of 
ten cents per share was levied upon each and every share of the capital 
stock of said Company, payable limnt diately, to the Secretary, at the oltice 
of the Company or to James Newlaiids Jr.. Tranfer Secretary, Koom 35, 
Mills Building, third floor. Kan Francisco. Cal. 

Any stoak upon which tins assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THURSDAY, THE 13TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1902, 
will be deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
a' ction; and unless payment is made before will be sold on Tuesday, the 
18th day of March, 1902. at four o'clock p. in,, in front of the oftlce of the 
Company, to pay ihe deliiKiuent asstssment, loeether with costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 

W. H. BLAUVELT, Secretary. 



Phone Main 153 



RUBBER TIRES 



Established 1862- 



TOMKINSON'S LIVERY STABLE 

NOS. 57-59-61 MINNA ST., between is*, and Second. 
One block from Palace Hotel.... 

Carriag* s and coupes at Pacific Union Club, corner I'ost and Stockton. Tel. 
Main 153 Every vehicle requisite for business or pleasure. Special orders 
for Four-in-Hands. J. TOMKlNSON, PROP. 

Tkaciifie takes bnekward pupils in English: foreigners. Telegraphy 

taught. 91ti Bush. 

Superfluous Imir, moles permanently removed; electric needle. Miss 
Dudley, 1702 Market. 



February I, 1902 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWB LETTER. 

INSURANCE. 



19 



FIRE, MARINE, ANO INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMAMS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. OAu 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 

I'nexcelled for liberality ami eacultj 

Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California 
HomeOfflcp: 
PaciHc Mutual Building 
San Francisco 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



C. P- MULLINS. Manaeer, 416-418 Calilornla Btreet. S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode is. 



BTJTLER 4 HEWITT. Qeneral Aeenta 



413 California Btreet. S. F. 



Fire Association, of Philadelphia 
Philadelphia Underwriters, of Philadelphia 

PENN 
J. M. BECK, Manaeer 
219 SanRome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Caah Capital 81,000.000.00 

Caeh Assets 4,081,895.13 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,092.661.01 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manaeer 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco aeent. 411 California street. 

Br,tish and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital 86,700.0liii 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital. (2.250,000 Assets. 110.984,248 

YOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 

Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg:, Germany 

N. Schlessinger, City Agent 304 Montgomery St., S. F. 




MAmrne t>i:i-Ajrr/i»„«T. 




10ND0N ASSURANCE. 



$4,482,750 
2,241, 375 
19.195.145 

$5,000,000 

500,000 

2,502 050 




INSURANCE COMPANY 

Off" FRKKTORT 



M. WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sar. Francisco, Cal 
Phone. Main 5609. 



Founded A. D. 1792 



nsurance Company of /North f\ 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA. PENN. 

Paid-up Capital f3.000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 85.022.016 

JAMES D. BALLET. General Aeent. 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 
Capital Paid Up, »3.446.100 Assets. #24.662 048.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. S8.930.431.41 Losses Paid Over. J184.000.000.00 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

„„,.„, „, .,. 501 Montgomery Btreet. 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manaeer 

HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Manaeers. 
FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital, «5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's bulldlne, 312 California street 



Booker & Lhnt. City Aeents. 14 Post street 



W. P. THOMAS. Manaeer 



Fire, Liehtnine, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital. $3,000,000 Gross Assets, 813,637,838 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $7,631,926 
H. L, Rofp. General Agent; Geo. M. Mttchpxl, &, Co.. City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of 
Genkral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensur- 
ing prompt response to the needs and requirements of its aeents and the 
insuring public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and 
Payment op Losses 

THE AMERICAN CREDIT- 
INDEMNITY GO. OF NEW YORK 

S. M. PHELAN, President. 
CREDIT INSURANCE ONLY 

The Leadlne Mercantile Houses of the United States 
endorse this system. 
Correspondence Solicited. A business producer and profit protector. 
GEORGE J. STERNSDORFF. 211 SANSOME STREET 

Pacific Coast Aeent Tel. Black 4434 SAN FRANCISCO 



WE 
PAY You ft 

losses 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(incorporated by the State of New York.) 
Assets over 862,000,000. Liabilities 853,0' 0,000, Surplus over 88,000,000 

Issucb policies for all approved forms of insurance, adapted to all stations 
and circumstances of life. Policies are free from restriction" as *o travel 
and residence; are clear, concise business contracts, and oondltions are 
plain and "imple and easily understood. 

Home office — New York .City. Pacific Coast head office. Hayward 
Bnildins:, California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisco. 

Jonn K. Heereman, President; Haley Flske. Vice-Presld'nt; Geo. B. 
Woodward, Secretary; George H. Gaston. Second Vice-President; James 
8. Hoberts, Assistant Secretary* 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 



Bubbles From the Swim. 



By Lady Algy. 

It has been definitely decided that immediately after their 
marriage the McNears will tour the world. Georgie Hopkins 
has, of course, had the usual jaunt to Europe. As necessary 
as the bead to champagne is this top-off to a fashionable 
education. However, it is one thing to "do" the Continent 
while still in the vealy schoolgirl period and another to poke 
into out-of-the-way corners with all the privileges and pre- 
rogatives that go with a wedding ring. Having taken the 
requisite dose of museums and picture galleries, one can 
freely quaff the delights the unthrottled taste suggests. 
Husbands never become impedimenta, for there are so 
many places "it is perfectly proper to go to with one's hus- 
band, don't you know." And as Mrs. Will Crocker once 
naively put it, "you don't know how useful husbands are 
till you get stranded in some 2x4 European town, with the 
cobwebs of centuries thick on manners and customs. Why, 
whenever we had to put up at some inn where there was 
no lift, Will used to carry me upstairs, and I never minded 
the absence of elevators." Which shows to what good use, 
besides paying bills, able-bodied husbands may sometimes 
be put. 

The McNears have some very good connection in London 
who ought to be useful to them socially, should they care 
to go in for that sort of thing, while tarrying on the right 
little tight little isle. There are few who do not proclaim 
Georgie's match the banner one of the family — Taylor pres- 
tige to the contrary notwithstanding. I fancy even the Hop- 
kins-Taylors themselves realize this, now that the McNear 
tour de la mode is on the tapis. 

Apropos of globe-trotting. I hear that the Walter Martins 
have penetrated into the Gotham noly of holies — thanks to 
the helping hand of Lily Oelrichs — which would argue well 
for Mr. Peter Martin's suit, as she certainly would not waste 
graciousness on Mr. Walter Martin and his bride, if she did 
not regard them as relations-to-be. I fancy this second 
European trip of Mary Scott's will prove pleasanter than her 
first one. That slipped a cog in the beginning, and never 
got back to ball-bearings. It was originally planned that 
Mary Crocker was to be of the party, but young Mr. Har- 
rison side-tracked that with his proposal. So Mary Scott 
went over with Suzanne Green instead. In London she was 
to be presented to the Queen, but that alio went a-glimmer- 
ing, some said, because as the daughter of a middle-class 
Englishwoman she could not enjoy the distinction accorded 
Americans of no rank. However, there will be no hitch 
in her presentation as Mrs. Walter Martin, for Walter has 
already elbowed with royalty, thanks to the friendly shove 
of Madame Melba, who shared her open sesame with him. 
Of course Melba favor did not clear the way to personal in- 
tercourse with the Queen herself, but he dined with dukes 
and supped with earls. Mary Scott-Martin has never re- 
sented her husband's admiration for Melba, and when she 
sees how the diva paved the way for them to warm their 
social ambitions at some of the proudest hearthstones in 
England she ought to be duly grateful. "Presented to the 
Queen" will be merely incidental, as that is an old tale for 
Americans. But to hobnob en famille with the aristocracy 
is another story. 

* * • 

The wave of indignation that threatened to inundate the 
San Francisco Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy 
has at last broken into bubbles, and left them high and 
dry. Immediately after the deplorable flag incident, which 
is now medieval history, Mrs. Van Wyck resigned the 
Presidency, and for awhile things looked a bit cloudy. But 
now the air has cleared, and the members are again in heart- 
to-heart accord. At the last meeting Mrs. Voorhies was 
elected President of the local chapter, and Mrs. Seldon 
Wright of the State Division. I know of no other organiza- 
tion that numbers so many charming women as the D. C. 
All the fine Southern families, and there is a plentiful 
leavening of them in our cosmopolitan midst, are repre- 
sented. The good they accomplish can not be lightly reck- 
oned; they do not keep open old wounds, and their work is 
healing and sanitary. Many thorns that prick the sides of 
Confederate veterans are lanced by these ladies. Only those 



who do not understand their ends and aims cavil and cry 
"sectionalism." The sober-minded have weighed them and 
not found them wanting, and under Mrs. Voorhies' direction 
the organization will undoubtedly take a strong stride nearer 
its ideal. 

• • • 

Oakland society has at last solved the problem of inducing 
the San Francisco ton to attend its functions. It is so 
simple that the wonder is that it was not thought of for the 
yester-seasons. The Oaklanders now crowd two or three 
teas into an afternoon, with perhaps a dinner or dance on 
the evening of the same day. This simplifies matters, for 
'cross-the-bay friends, who can come over and thus do up 
three or four things in a bunch, whereas if the affairs were 
stretched over the calendar regrets would be in order from 
this side of the bay. But when one can go to three teas 
there on the same afternoon, it is more plausable to expect 
us to say "howdy-do" to our Oakland cousins. 

• • • 

Mr. Morgan grows steadily weaker, so Therese and Ella 
are out of joint with the gaieties of their set. The doctors 
give no hope of his recovery, and the family are prepared for 
the worst. There has been much comment over the fre- 
quent mention of Ella Morgan's name at Presidio hops and 
small teas, while her father lies so close to death. The 
critics are up the wrong tree, for there are two Ella Mor- 
gans, and they've p.iched on the wrong one. The two Ella 
Morgans are not even related, nor are the families in the 
same set. "The Ella Morgan who is not Therese's sister" 
is the round about explanation usually given when their 
identities are shuffled. This Ella Morgan is also the daugh- 
ter of wealth, and is a charming girl. She was one of the 
bridesmaids at the Bishop-Van Black wedding. 

• • * 

The last of the La Jeunesse Cotillions is expected to put 
the cap sheaf of glory on its previous successes. La Jeu- 
nesse is a happy medium between the Salisbury and Green- 
way cotillions. The Salisbury suppers are about as satisfy- 
ing as waffles and the Greenway's are epicurean repasts that 
Lucullus might toy with. La Jeunesse does not attempt 
such sumptuousness, but there's always plenty of tempting 
things to eat and wine enough. Mrs. Herman Oelrichs and 
Birdie Fair-Vanderbilt will be in town, and society hopes they 
will lend their presence to this and the other affairs that are 
being crowded in before Lent is with us for forty days. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All drueetsts refund the money If 
it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature la on each box. Price 25 cents 



After the theatre go to Techau Tavern, the favorite 

resort of San Francisco's best people. The music every 
evening is a drawing feature. 



In the sick room or on your sideboard Jesse Moore "AA" 

Whiskey is indispensable. 








February 1, 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



1:1 



To a Lady in a Shop-Window. 

O Lady with the wistful dean | 

Fur love of you I lose my rest — 

My heart Is greatly troubled In my breast 

And all the long still night Is heavy with m> > 

<> Lady with the dear dark cloudy hair 
That moment when I passed your way. 
Itamp6d vour image on my heart toi 

Awake, asleep, I see your dear face everywbi 
And oh. the slumb'rous passion of your glance — 

Like some deep river, o'er whose side 

The gath'rlng waters, in a mighty tide. 
Wait but the appointed time to make their wild advance. 

And he who stood beside you, dull and still, 

Laggard of tongue, and recking naught 

Of all Loves wisdom that your dear .yes taught— 
Not his to wake those eyes, or mould you to his will. 

But past your window I will quickly dash — 
1 will not read the legend grim 
That daily desecrates both you and him — 

"These stylish suits we sell for $20, cash." 

R. C. E. MILNE. 



A PHYSICIAN'S DIRECTORY FOR TELEPHONES. 
Did it ever occur to the reader how really difficult it is 
to procure a physician speedily in a case of urgent neces- 
sity? Every well ordereu household has a family physician, 
but in the event of accident or sudden illness the saving 
of a life often depends on the time it takes for a physician 
to come from his office to the patient. If the doctor is close 
at hand the chances are in favor of his' arrival in time to 
do much good, but if he is located in an office across the city 
it is often useless to summon him at all. The News Letter 
has information concerning a woman who recently became 
very ill at a social gathering. She was taken into an ante- 
room and her friends wasted several minutes hysterically 
searching through the telephone directory for the address of 
a physician. When a doctor was at last called from another 
part of town the woman was dead. The News Letter sug- 
gests that a good work could be done by the telephone com- 
panies both here and in the East if an emergency directory 
were inserted in the front of each telephone book, the names 
of physicians who are subscribers being placed according to 
their streets. This would insure the summoning of the phy- 
sician nearest at hand in the shortest possible time. Our 
local company might add this to its numerous other improve- 
ments over the Eastern systems. i 



For years St. Louis has resisted the efforts of the life 
insurance men at organization, and of late it has been sus- 
pected that the city ratter prided itself upon its distinction 
in that regard. President Wyman of the National Associa- 
tion of Life Underwriters wants to get the West well organ- 
ized, and started out on St. Louis. He got scores of letters 
from their home offices and elsewhere to tie leading local 
agents of St. Louis, and after some preliminary correspond- 
ence went down there last week with Mr. Fred B. Mason 
the national secretary. On Thursday their work was 
crowned by the organization of a lively local association 
with forty charter members. Mr. W. G. Day of the Provi- 
dent Life and Trust being President. They were helped in 
their work by the appreciation by the St. Louis agents of 
the fact that they should be organized in preparation for 
the World's air of 1903. 



The President Suspender Co. is now making for high-class 
trade a suspender in a very fine grade of webbing with 
specially made mercerized cord and French gilt buckles. 
The President has been proven the most convenient, easy 
and hygienic one made. 



Smartest Train of All- 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter journey across the continent. 



NO IMAGINARY AFFAIR 
The Nonpareil Gat Burning Water Heater take* Mi. 

nf ike inrK'- coal beater. Light th.> ens and water flow.) 
hot Lhroufhoul the entire building in ■ tew leconjj after 
toe match la applied, The coal of a bath is the price of the 
mail h and one and one-half cents for gas. The Nonpareil's 
polnl nf excellence and convenience makes it ■ heater "f 




The Nonpareil Water Heater in Actual Operation. 

universal necessity. It is practically indestructible, and as 
easy to operate as a gas stove. Light the gas and clean hot 
water flows at the rate of from three to four gallons per min- 
ute. It has twenty-four square feet of heating surface and 
consumes ninety-six per cent of the heat generated by the 
burner. The above cut shows one of our smallest heaters 
attached to a 120-gallon boiler. This small machine distrib- 
utes hot water throughout the entire building and supplies 
six bath tubs. 

Doctors, dentists, professors in chemistry, heads of hos- 
pitals, colleges, sanitariums, hotels, creameries, barber 
shops, residences, clubs, paper hangers, bakers, clothes 
cleaners, and engine houses are using the Nonpareil and 
take pleasure in recommending it. 

The Nonpareil Manufacturing Company are the owners 
of the patent for the Pacific Coast, and are Incorporated for 
$50,000. They extend an invitation to the general public and 
business men to call at their office, salesrooms and fac- 
tory, 322 Post street, opposite Union Square, for full par- 
ticulars and practical demonstration. Telephone Drumm 33. 



If you will watch the Sun- 
day papers for our special 
sales each week of drugs, 
medicines, toilet articles, 
you can save considerably 
over our regular cut rates. 
Telephone orders delivered 
at once. South 356. 

&/>e Owl Drug Co. 

1128 MARKET ST., S. F. 
BROADWAY 4.10TH ST., OAKLAND. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




THE PATHS OF DEATH. 
(Harriet Preseott Spoft'ord, in Scribner's ) 

There are two folds upon the hill, 

And one is lone and very still — 

Only the rustle of a leaf 

Gives happy sound of life and stir, 

And warbles bubbling bright and brief 

Where the bird skims with fearless whirr, 

Or a bee rifling on his way 

The honey from a wild-rose spray. 

Sometimes a soft and summer shower 

Drops gentle music hour by hour, 

Or a long breath of wandering air 

Makes melancholy murmur there, 

And all is calm and full of peace 

There where the dead have sweet surcease. 

Within that other place of graves 

The wild rains fall, the wild wind raves— 

In every dusky alley met 

Sad ghosts, who beat an aching breast 

With anguished longing and regret, 

Remember that they once were blest, 

The heart gone out of them, the soul 

Fled onward to some unknown goal. 

For them no glad and further year, 

Ashes the rose, and beauty sere, 

Without a wish except to fill 

Their eyes with dust — the dead who still 

With ruined hope and joyless mirth 

Go to and fro upon the earth! 



MY CIGARETTE GIRL. 
(The Pipe Dreamer, in 1 he Gentleman's Magazine-) 
I love when the day is fast nearing its close 
To flee from the city's mad whirl, 
To lounge in my armchair before the great hearth 
And dream of my cigarette girl. 
An houri, she floats on Nicotia's ringed waves. 
Dispels my glum doubts, soothes my surl. 
I sybarite yield to her sybarite charm 
And smile at my cigarette girl. 

The dream oft seems real, then I catch 'neath a curl 
And laughing flees forth, this wee smoke witch of mine 
My dear, tricky cigarette girl. 

is it because she inconstant, I love,.. 
And throws all my thoughts in a whirl? 

1 know that I smoke that one hundred a day 
To be near my cigarette girl. 



NOCTURNE. 

(Jeanette Bliss Gillespy, in The Bookman.) 
Speak softly, sweet, and bid the lutes play low; 
Let the low laughter live but in your eyes; 
Dusk be in the air and dim where, spirit-wise, 
Move we in noiseless passage to and fro. 
One lies asleep beside the fountain's flow, 
Lulled by the murmurous water's fall and rise; 
Him may we not awake to other guise 
Than this still shape that doth not hear or know. 
Fair on the borders of a dream he lies, 
Loath to let slip the ways by which he came, 
Stilling each sense that seeks the world of men. 
Hush, sweet! — no whisper — nay, no speech of eyes- 
Lest, roused at last by mention of his name, 
Love shall awake that will not sleep again. 



REST. 

(Preston Cooke Far ar. in the Critic.) 
Rest? We shall rest to-morrow. 

No soldier halts to-day, 
When the bugles are calling clearly 

And the van is up and away. 
Would you have us lag in the shadow 

Till the chance of glory's gone? 
Let our bayonets shine on the firing line 
When the battle of life is on! 



San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. P. 

Deposits July 1. 1901... H28.978.M0 Reserve Fund 8226.99 

Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 Contingent Fund 445.617 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 

LOVF.LL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Maeee. W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller. Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
lu San Francisco, PoBt Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but Hie responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
rails only 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET. 

DlRHOTOES— Adulpli C. Weber. President: W. J. Lowry, Vice-President- 
N . S. Keyes; I. Kohn: G. H. I.uchsinger. 
A. I). Keyes and C. E. Hatch, attorneys: Ernest Brand, Secretary. 



The 
Tribune 



A NEWSPAPER NOTE 

OAKLAND'S 

GREAT 

EVENING 

NEWSPAPER 



1^ managed, for San 

13 Francisco advertising business, 

by F. R. Porter, whom 

consult; tariff inVitirg. 

9 Powell street, Columbia 

Theatre Building, San 

Francisco. 

C. F. MATTHEWS, D.D.S.. Manager 

MATTHEWS DENTAL CO. 

SPECIALTY: CROWN AND BRIDGE WORK 

128 Powell Street. 

Phone Red 27 A San Francisco 

From Thomas', Loudon 
MANUFACTURER OF 




Fine Shoes 



Near Waldorf-Astoria. 60 WEST 34TH ST. 

Between 6th Ave. and Broadway. New York. 



Gray Bros. 



Hayward Bide:.. California and Monteomery 

streets. San Francisco. 

2U5 New Hleh Street. i.os Angeles 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 




ST. LAWRENCE LIVERY AND 
SALES STABLE 



423 Post street, between Powell and Mason. 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 



W. K. Rridire. proprietor. 



BLAKE, MOFFIT & TOWNE 



Blake. MoQH & Towne Los Anereles. 
Blake. MoFall & Co. Purt'and Or 



Telephone Main 199. 

DEALERS IN PAPER 

5-57-69-61 First street S. F 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA 
BITTERS. the great 

Mexican remedy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs. 

Depot at 323 Market St.. San Francisco. Sena for circular 

Pacific Towel Company no. 9 Lick Place 

Furnishes 6 hnnd or roller towels 81 per month; 12 hand or 
roller towels 8160 per month. Tel. Main 1780. 



February 1, 1902 



SAN FRANCI3CO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



BANKING. 



London and San Francisco Bank. »».« Wells FargO & Company Bank 

♦34 t AI.IKORr»lA STRKKT. * 



i.'l CALIFORNIA STREET 
HKU» oFFHF 71 l.omh*rd afreet. lx>ndon. 

Capital Authnrlied. *2.V>\n00. Capital Paid Dp, II. ■ 

Dlrrctor*— Hcnrr Oo^chen. Chtlrmmi. tendon: Christ Un de Oulrne. 
San Fr*nci«co: Churlc* Hrmory. London; John I~ Howard. H»n Fran* 

eisco: Bendl* Koppel. Loadou: Orerllle Honloj Palmer, London ; Norman 

D. Rldeoul. San Fr»nol*eo: Arthur Scrivener. T *»ndon. 

Agent* In New York, Mw»r». J. P. Morgan * Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon; Taconia. Wash.. Seattle, Wash- 

letter* of credit l«*ued available (or travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise In any city of the world. Deal In foreign and domestic oxena nge 
Account* of country hanks received. Terms on application. 

A. L. Black. Cashier W. Mackintosh. Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which Is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAP OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000- Reserve Fund, $2,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over $65,000,000- 

Hon- Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 lx>mbard St.. E C. S. Cameron Alexander, Manage 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place, Alex. Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: U BRANCHES. 

Quebec: Montreal : Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood. Kami oops, Nanalmo, Nelson. New Westminster. Sand on. 
Vancouver. Victoria. In the United Slates — New York. N. Y. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal- Seattle. Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway, Alaska. 
Bankers In London — The Bank of Scotland: Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans. 
— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Coe. Sansome and Stjtteb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Pald-Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $1,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENT3: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres A Cle, 17 
Boulevard Polssoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. Manager. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson. President W«, Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill. Cashier F. VV. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $500,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $130,000. 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, Wm. J Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel &. Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London-' 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Franc'sco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check accounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depositoby for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tetjst deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A. Frederick, vice-President; H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg, W. A- Frederlok, Fred A- Kuhls, E 
A, Denlcke, A- G. Wieland, Fred Woerner. J. O. Rued, Fred 0. Siebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business. Bells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STELNHART, P. N. LLTJENTHAL. Managers. 



Paid Up $1,500,000 

Reserve Fund... 700,000 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St Mills Building, 



Interest paed oh deposits. 



WilliamAlvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 

directors. 

S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D, Baldwin 

W. S. Jones 



Pn -Idrnt 
Manager 
< 'ashler . 

-iiirn . 

tad .\«t. r**hipr. 



JOBR .'. VlLUfUl) 
HoMKK S. Kim*. . 
M. WAUrWOBTB 

!-". I. l.iriiAN. 
II. I.. Mili.kr 



{NlW York, 
malt Lake, . 
porti.asd. or., 



Han Pranclaro 
. Ben Ft i 

Nun Francisco 
Nan Frnpi 

Hun I'rm, 

II- ». PAUOHS, * ashler 

J i:. Dooly, Cashier 
K. I,ka Harm-*, Caahle 

Statement of Condition at Close of Business, July 31, 1901. 

ASSETS 

Loans.. $l0.*VI2.4or»/,i 

Bonds Stocks and Warrants 8.191.72700 

Ileal Estate j g-E „.,,, — 

MI»oellaneou8 Aaaets .........""." I2 416AS 

I>ue from Banks and Bankers.... ....".........!". 1 104 90819 

C * eh "." sMlffn'joi 



L.ABILHIES HW-WMJ7 

^*t> l \*l $ 500.WO.00 

•surplus .-.»....»... 6.7. 0.000.00 

Undivided Profits.. 8.81129088 

Deposits. Banks and Bankers i 124 165 <rj 

Individual ..,...""""! rt'jMM,' 10^62 



$19.5.89.558.17 
General banking business in all its branches. Correspondents throughout 
the World- Accounts received on favorable terms. 



H. H, Hewlett 
B. J. McOutchen 
R. H, Pease 



The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 82.000.000. 

Surplus, $1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits, January 1. 191)2, $2,889 310.65. 

WILLIAM AJ.VORD .President! THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-Pres't I. F. MOULTON ABs't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary! SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co. ; the Bank ol New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. RothBchild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit Issued, available in all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,316,381.43 

Capital actually paid up In Cash l.uw "t>0 00 

Deposits December 31. 1901 30.766 033.17 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann, Ign. SMnhart, H. B. Russ, Emil Rohte, N Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann ; Sec- 
retary. George Tourny; .Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attor 
ney, W. S. Goodiellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

83 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Mubphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hoofer, Vice-President 

O. B. Hoeson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
MoDonald, Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange oh 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital..$12,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... $250,000 
Pald-ln-Capltal 2.000,000 Monthly Income, over lou.000 

Its Purpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, General Manager 

Crocker- Wool Worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts, 

Paid-up-Capital $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

O. E. Green. Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr.. Assistant Ca 9 h| e 

^ Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B Pond, George Crocker, O. E. Green, G. W 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scott 



24 

THE JAPANESE BILL OF FARE. 

Breakfast, which in Japan is eaten 
at sunrise, is light and dainty. It com- 
mences with a small fruit, a persim- 
mon usually. Then kamaboko is served, 
which is white fish pounded with a stone 
masher, then rolled into little balls and 
baked brown in radish oil, though but- 
ter could be substituted. The inevi- 
table tea completes this simple meal. 

Luncheon, a mid-day meal, begins 
with a soup. Charvan is a thin soup 
made of the bones of a large fish, 
strained and then boiled again with 
mushrooms. It is served in little bowls 
without handles, no larger than cups. 
Shiruko is a delicious kind of rice cake 
partaken of at luncheon. The rice is 
first boiled to a paste, then cut into 
thin cakes, and fried in oil. A sauce 
made of red beans is poured over it. 
To make a pint of this sauce take half 
a pint of red canned beans or of fresh 
shelled red beans, add enough water 
to cover them; boil to a paste, stirring 
constantly to prevent burning, then add 
two heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar 
with enough water to make a pint of 
sauce. Let it come to the boiling point 
in order that the sugar may be perfectly 
dissolved. Konomona is a side dish. 
It is nothing more than pickled egg- 
plant cut in slices three-quarters of an 
inch thick, peel, let lie for two hours 
in cold water with salt added in the 
proportion of one cup of salt to two 
quarts of water. Then drain this off 
and put weak vinegar and water on it 
to remove the salty flavor. Let it lie 
in this for two hours (one cup of vine- 
gar to a quart of water is the proper 
proportion.) Then drain this all off, 
and pour hot vinegar all over it. Use 
enough vinegar to cover it well. If the 
slices rise to the top put a plate or 
saucer over and press down. Add to 
the hot vinegar spices in the proportion 
of one tablespoonful of mixed spices to 
one quart of vinegar. Add also one 
cup of sugar. Let it stand until thor- 
oughly pickled. 

Visitors to Japan have been quoted 
often as saying that a dinner there 
is a most wonderful function, which, 
like the brook, runs on forever. They 
must refer to banquets, or special din- ' 
ners given in honor of foreign guests, 
who, not knowing just when it is polite 
to cease eating, follow the example of 
the host and miserably continue to 
swallow long after they have sickened 



SAN FRANC18CO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 




\i 



Substitutes 



v Good Advice 



\ A writer in tke Chaperone Ma g azine 

\ on Flannels. Blankets and Laces insists 

\ orv little wrin ging for woollens and no 

\ rubbing for laces. Every intelligent 

I woman Kas a method of Ker own 

I but all agree on tkose two pomts- 

I hard points \ising ordinary bar soap- 

I harder still with, penny- cheap 

I Washing powders. 



fl Have vised Pearurve a aumber of years, and lik 
# I very nwacK for all kiads of flaaael garments. They . . 

'» / r° ft WVd "^ * fter WaSKirVg- Mrs. Rev. C.T. 

, M I Am ivever witko\i(Peaiiil\e. Use it with the most delicate 

J I fabrics at\d with, coarse things. Fit\d it satisfactory 

/ I in all things. M s R „ G E , 



Jearlirve —Safest and Easiest 



1 for Coarsest arvd Fhvest Fabrics. 



themselves. All the while their host 
is politely accompanying them and wait- 
ing for them to turn down their rice 
bowls. 

An ordinary Japanese dinner is al- 
most as simple a meal as breakfast or 
luncheon, save that the number of bowls 
of rice consumed is greater. In fact, 
dinner is commenced with a bowl of this 
deliciously cooked rice — cooked as 
only it should be cooked, every grain 
standing out moist and plump and sep- 
arate — and the bowl is replenished con- 
stantly throughout the meal, until it 
is turned over, signifying that the diner 
has had enough and wishes to conclude 
the meal. The reason foreigners never 
seem able to cook rice properly is be- 
cause they stir it and sometimes put 
milk or butter into it, or else they over- 
cook it. Rice, covered with water, 
should be simply boiled or steamed over 
a slow fire, and allowed to simmer away 
until all the water has dried off. After 
this it is covered with a napkin to keep 
the moisture in, and kept In a warm 
place on the stove. 

After the first bowl of rice, soup fol- 
lows. Shiru is the choicest of soups. 
It is made of seaweed, boiled to a thin 
jelly and flavored with chicken giblets, 
chopped into infinitessimal pieces. (Sea- 
weed dried for soup can be obtained 
at Japanese or Chinese stores in New 
York.) 

Namasu, a dish which may not at first 
appeal to a foreigner, Is nevertheless 
delicious. It consists of young raw fish, 
sliced very thin and pickled in vinegar 
with red peppers. The flavor of the fish 
is pungent. It is served with cold 
stewed vegetables, bamboo shoots, etc. 

A big bowl of sakfe (a wine brewed 
from rice, and obtainable at Chinese 
and Japanese stores here, I believe) oc- 
cupies the center, and it is drunk con- 
tinuously throughout the meal. Tea is 
served at the conclusion, and, finally, a 
pull at long thin pipes completes the 
dinner. 

The Japanese butler is often an artist 
as well as an excellent cook. A meal 
is served up in a way to delight the 
sight and smell as well as the taste. 
Each one has his own lacqifr tray on 
which his several dishes are disposed. 
Some of the dishes are fashioned into 
the most unique and fanciful designs. 
Egg, for instance, boiled like a custard, 
but without sugar, is usually served up 



in the shape of some flower — a chrysan- 
themum, rose, or lily. 

Other dishes served usually at a ban- 
quet or dinner follow. All may be pre- 
pared here in the United States. 

An appetizing dish which has a med- 
ley of flavors is prepared thus: chicken, 
duck and venison are cut into small 
slices and the vegetables hakobera, 
natokuoza. suzushiro, seri and nazuna 
added. Celery, cabbage shaved fine, 
boiled beets cut into small pieces, 
small boiled string beans and peas have 
been used in place of these Japanese 
vegetables. Put the meat into a porce- 
lain kettle with enough water to cover 
the contents. If made of fresh fowl and 
game, do not put the vegetables in un- 
til the meat is nearly done, then add 
them and cook long enough to let the 
vegetables become tender. The celery 
and cabbage are to be put in raw and 
wnl require about half an horn' to cook, 



Why 
Buy 

a second-class piano 
when the Chickering can 

Ibe had for a little ad- 
ditional cost, 

GHJIffi 



have stood the test of 
year -and to-day they 
are even better than 
ever. 



Benj Curtaz 

SOLE AGENTS 
16 to 20 O'Farrell St. 



& Son 



February 1. 1902 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



2» 



but tho other vegetables need simply 
brought to tho boiling point. 
*■ with flour b 
smoothly Into co\<\ water In tho propor- 
tion of one tablespoonful of flour to 
it of the water In Which the meat 
has been boiled. When the stew is done, 
mushrooms whleh have been separately 
In grease are added. The dish Is 
classlfled as a fish by the wily Japanese. 

Om of the most tasty of dishes is 
'>f cucumbers boiled until they 
change color and soften (.that is. boiled 
fifteen minutes); then drained, 
and while the vegetable Is steaming 
hot butter is put on It and pepper and 
salt. It is eaten while hot. 

Another dish excellent for a dinner — 
which is practicable here only for those 
who can procure venison — is one more 
illustration of how the wily Japanese 
epicure disguises his Jeer meat. A 
delicate fish is sliced and fried, then 
mushrooms are fried. Neither should 
be more than partially cooked. Then 
the dish is made up by putting a slice of 
fish next to a small slice of raw venison 
with mushroom between. This is put 
into an oven and cooked in its own 
juices. — Collier's Weekly. 



CLOUDS AND SHADOWS. 

"What is it, auntie?" as she waddled 
through the smoke house annex to the 
justice's court. 

"None of you' 'fair what it am. I'se 
gwine to see de jedge, I is. I hain't ask- 
ing no 'vice frum men settin' roun' 
smokin' an' chawin' like no 'count white 
trash. I could give youins 'vice ef 1 
had it to cas' befo' swine." 

"Well, auntie?" from the justice aa 
she filled the doorway. 

"Nuthin well 'bout it, jedge. See dis 
yaller-paca dress I'se got on? It's dat 
wored out I got to step light tea' it'll 
drop to rags. How you 'spect a woman 
dat wa' raised wid quality fo' to 'tend 
Yeastah wurship in a ga'meut like dat 
an' joy hehself?" 

"Won't George yield up the price?'' 

"Don't talk to me 'bout dat ole coon. 
Don't talk 'bout him, I say. He's been 
eighty yeahs on dis he' yearth and he's 
got worse ebery day. Eber he shows 
dat ole cotton top of he's at my do' 
once mo' I won't be 'sponsible, jedge. 
I gibs you fair wa'nin', I won't be 'spon 
sible fo' nuthin'." 

"Wlhat's he been up to now?" 

"It's de grace ob de Lord I didn't 
split him wid de gridawn, jedge. 1 
br'iled two pullets fo' dat ole rep'er- 
genate. Yas, sah, two. An' he comes 
in late fo' his dinner and he wrinkles 
he's ole flat nose and he say he can't 
eat no stuff like dat, an' me a quality 
cook all mah life. An' I say, 'what you 
lookin' fo', you ole fool, in de middle of 
de wintah, possum an' yam an' water- 
million?' An' he tuhn on one he's long 
heels an' lef. I wan to have him 'rested 
fo' slandahin' mah cookin' an' fo' de 
price ob a new dress; red bum'azine o' 
baby blue or anythin' 'spectable." 

"I'll see him, auntie." 

"Dat's right, jedge, an' you tell him 
if he come home like a husban' awter 
an' bring dat dress an' 'have heself an" 
take back what he said 'bout dem pul- 
lets, I won't furgit him an' roe's been 
man an' wife fo' fifty-fo' yeahs." — Ex. 






LEA & PERRINS^ 

" e 0r '9ma, 4 Genuine worcestersmr* 

Makes all Chafing-dish cookery palatable 
and digestible.- Gives a delicate flavor to 
Welsh rarebits, Lobster Newburgh.Oysters.etc 



6emf*t & l*>,fsf>Qn3 



on every toffie OCM^ ' - -*s*£4 



Jonn Duncan's Sons 
Agents -tfewfor*. 



SUNBEAMS. 

(Stolen from Thieve!". I 

Casey — Costlgan ;:ot his life insured 
for tin cints. Conroy — How wuz that? 
Casey — He borrowed tin tints av tli' 
foreman, and the foreman won't put 
him on a dangerous job as long as he 
owes him tin eints! 

"Do you think ("holly's manner is 
natural or affected?' 1 "Well. I try to 
think the best of everybody — so I don't 
know which to think." 

"They say Miss Millions has eloped 
with her father's coachman." "Coach- 
man? I presume you mean her father's 
chauffeur?" 

Old Friend — Was your daughter's mar- 
riage a success? Hostess — Oh, a great 
success. She's traveling in Europe on 
the alimony. 



Miss Gushlere — How torturing, how 
fearful the thought must be for a great. 
singer to know she has lost her voice! 
Miss Praclere— It's much more tortur- 
ing when she doesn't know it. 

"Do you know, he's an awfully nice 
chap, hut 1 have never seen him in 
church. Of what religion is he?" "Why. 
he belongs to the theatrical syndicate." 

South American countries could de- 
rive a good revenue and greatly sys- 
tematize affairs by not allowing any one 
to start a revolution without having 
first taken out a license. 

He (at midnight) — Funny custom the 
Chinese have. The hostess is expected 
to notify the caller when it is time 
to go. She (with a sigh) — But we are 
in England, you know. 

Little Elmer — Papa, what is it that 
makes a statesman great? Professor 
Broadhead — Death, my son. 



OVERLAND MONTHLY 

FEBRUARY— Now Out 
* The Best of the West ^ 

FASCINATING READING AND 
HANDSOME ILLUSTRATIONS 
THROUGHOUT j* j» j» jt 

Frontispiece Dr. Yamei Kin 

The Life and Death of Chouicha, A Sacramento River Salmon 

Illustrated by the author. Cloudsley Rutter 



The Office Detail, a Study of Newspaper Cranks. 
Illustrated by C. L. Peter. 



.W. J. Weymouth 



"Who cares for money?" cried Uncle 
Russell Sage in a bakery at noon the 
other day, "give us another cent's worth 
of gingerbread." 



The Passing of Night Harley R. Wiley 

A Matter of Business Mary C. Ringwalt 

Sam E. R. Wynne 

"Bobbie" John Fleming Wilson 

Story. 
Recent Outdoor Literature. Charles Howard Shinn 

Illustrated by photographs. 
A Soul at the Crossroads Grace Garrill Gowing 

Story. Illustrated by Stanley Armstrong. 
The Pride of His House Dr. Yamei Kin 

Story. Illustrated. 
Sir Edwin Arnold, Poet James Matlack Scovel 

"Singin' Bill" George V. Carr 

Sketch. 
Current Books Reviewed by Grace Luce Irwin 

10 CENTS A COPY $100 A YEAR 

FREDERICK-MARRIOTT, Publisher,'5% Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 



A Quiet Day in the 

Chamber of Deputies 



Showing the Difficulties of Law Making During a "Profound 
French Calm." 

Paris, February 1: — Special dispatch to the News : 
by leased wire, the least in the world. 

The Chamber of Deputies opened to-day with a brisk de- 
bate between Count de Mouton de Roulade de Boeuf i Re- 
publican) and the Marquis de Fromage de Brie (Anti-Semite i 
in which the latter intimated that de Boeufs policy in recom- 
mending the removal of the chimes from Normandy savored 
of the Nationalist enterprises in Abyssinia. Here there 
was a brief pause in the proceedings while a meeting for 

2 p. m. Saturday was arranged between the seconds of de 
Boeuf and de Brie. Meanwhile the remarks of de Brie 
were somewhat sharply taken up by M. Alphonse Consomme 
i Nationalist) who took occasion to challenge the speaker 
publicly before the body. The meeting was arranged for 

3 p. m. Saturday. There is considerable speculation rife 
among the Members, some of whom are of the opinion that 
de Boeuf cannot meet M. Consomme oa Saturday, due to 
eight other duels for which the former has arranged on the 
same day. It is generally believed that several of the en- 
counters will hare to be postponed until Monday. 

M. Hors d'Oeuvres (Royalist I followed this by a rons 
speech on the glory of France. 

"Shall we," he said, feelingly, "shall we. standing as we do 
on the threshold of renown, allow our immortal duelling 
code to fall so into disuse that gentlemen shall get mixed 
up in their dates and not even know whether they are going 
to fight on Saturday or Monday or how many times? 
(Cheers). I hereby charge five of my Republican colleagues 
with gross negligence and challenge them to meet me oa 
the field of honor on any date or dates between February 
12th and March 15th." 

Here the speaker was interrupted by cheers of "A bas 
Dreyfus." •Vive l'armie," and "Go 'way back and sit down!" 

Before the cheers had died away, several Socialist mem- 
bers on the rear seats entered upon a heated discussion on 
the window tax. in which some brilliant repartee and several 
chairs were bandied back and forth. Some of the gentlemen 
involved were carried fainting from the hall, and during 
the course of the debate M. Ragout (Extreme Soi : 
caused a coup d'etat by flooring the Foreign Minister with 
a paper-weight. 

M. Goriot (Socialist!, who was at the time speaking elo- 
quently on the necessity of French intervention in the Boer 
war, was somewhat annoyed by these interruptions, and 
frowned slightly. He was. however, able to definitely prove 
the ultimate downfall of the English race before being 
knocked down by a stray missile from the hand of a Mem- 
ber on the Right. 

At this point a messenger entered excitedly and announced 
that an article in the Figaro had caused a riot among the 
students, and the session was adjourned in order that the 
members might see the fun. 

Thus was the dignity of the historic body again maintained 
at great cost. 

LATER. — It is generally conceded that a recess of three 
weeks will be enjoyed by the Members of the Chamber of 
Deputies, during which time the several pre-arranged duels 
may be fought off without interruption. 

LATER. — There is another riot among the students, due 
to the rumor of adjournment. 

W. I. 



Travelers always go to Zinkand's when they reach 

San Francisco. Thr fame of this famous eafV- has spread all 
over the world. Its food, wines and service are unexcelled, 
and its music is a delight to the patrons. 



Go ahead, if you wish, and try to clean your carpet 

by beating it with a stick: but your neighbor, who er: 

the services of Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning Wo: 

hama street, will have a cleaner carpet at less trouble. 

worry and expense. They do their work thoroughly, without 

injury to the fabric, and bring a carpet back looking like 

new. 




A. de LIZE & FILS 



BORDEAUX. 



Fine Clarets 
and Sauternes 



In Cases, Quarts, and Pints 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Sole Agents* 
314 Smmmei'to St.. San Frane'sco. 



Removal Notice. 

The offices of the CALIFORNIA COHMKRCIAL GUAR- 
ANTY CO. have been removed from the Chboxiclb Biildisg to 

184 CROCKER BUILDING, 9TH FLOOR. 

Bills, notes or accounts sent for collection will receive prompt at- 
te ition. as heretofore. All collections remitted in full within 24 
hours ofier receip . Respectfully. 

1*4 Crocker Bldg . City. Cal. Commercial Gtmbari 

Full Line of Spring Goods 

J. R. SMITH 
Tailoring Co., 

310 Bush St., under Russ House, S. F. 



(Formerly Id MIUs Building 



Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL MILL" 

Devotes lis entire revenue to the embellishment of its crounds. Burials 
are continuine as her- tofore- Plots and Graves lor Sale, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perp-tual care of same. Within .0 minutes of Kearny Street. 
Many street tar .ine-> pass the rate. 

Tel west 65. Bush and Central f\ve., San Francisco 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and Manufacturer of 



Artificial Stone 



ISehilllneer's Patent 1 in all its branches. 
aud earden walk, a si ecialty. 



Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, 



San Francisco 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 



TnE A\V\RP \T 
CHICAGO, 15S3L 

"r,R\ND FRtt" PAR1SLM THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARI*. The-e pe s are "the best in the world." 

S .le «e-i«t for the Inilel 9 

Mr. Hfsky HoK, vljohu Street. New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 

D ~ if U/ic *' or b * rb * re « bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, btllh i c 
Vj [ M \ [ I \~ S t*bles. brewers, book binders, candy-makers, cauners 
*^ dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries. paper-hanr~ 

ere. printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men. tar- 
rooffTB, tanners. t*"ors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BRJS. 

Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento St., S. F. Tel., 561 



1908 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



.1 



A Study in Superfluous Ego. 

Being a Story that Might Have Been Written by Mr. Henry 
James, and Would Sell Like Hot Cakes if It Had Been. 

i.inthini'. overwhelmed by the consciousness ot ber 
Utjr, swamped, as it were, if BOcb word could be UBed 
thet it can or not. it Is), with the ponderosity of what 
is pleased to call her realisation of s > ■ l f . although 
she did not know whether that was the proper 
nntion, and Imbued with the Idea that no mutter what hap- 
pened she would be true to her ideals, which, on accous 
her birth, training and education, were high, searched her 
inmost soul for an answer to something which tor days and 
sleepless nights (made still more horrible by thoughts of 
what might be if things were not what they are or appear to 
!,1 overwhelmed her with an insistent power, and had 
finally left her in a state which she could not explain with 
any degree of satisfaction to what might be termed the ego 
of her omniscience. 

It was Sunday, and in her Baekbay home they had had 
beans for breakfast. 

As she sat facing Philomen in the little parlor, which 
brought to her mind so many associations of by-gone days, 
and seemed in some way to remind her of a previous exist- 
ence (maybe the shaft of sunlight coming through the win- 
dow — which she noticed, with that faculty for inflnitessmal 
detail which worried minds sometimes possess, was par- 
ticularly clean — and glowing full upon the portrait of her 
maternal ancestor seven generations back, had something 
to do with this pre-existent frame of mind) and waited for 
the words that something (was it intuition?) told her that 
he had come especially to utter, a consciousness came upon 
her that, regardless of the exigencies that might arise she 
would be true to what she knew was the dictation of her 
unalterable and inalienable inner consciousness. 

If robins were eagles there would be more strawberries. 

When Philomen had walked down the street that after- 
noon, past houses whicn in their triinness resembled well 
ordered lives — which reminded him of people, who, unas- 
sailed by the world which they inhabit only in body, lived 
without reaching the unattainable — he was conscious that 
he had not shaved himself properly, that upon the corner 
of his chin was a stubble that stood out like a buttercup in 
a dish of pink ice-cream, and in his perturbation over this 
small affair, which he allowed to trouble him too much, he 
almost forgot to rehearse within his other self the words 
that had dawned upon him in the waking hour, and was 
only dimly conscious that he was to lecture that night 
before the "Gospelers of the Higher Return" in support of 
the theory that the soul is the super-conscious state of con- 
sciousness. 

How often is life merely an excuse for not dying! 

As Philomen sat facing Amaranthine in the parlor, which 
to him was the essence of all that is and represented the 
divinity that "prevails in the spirit and takes us away from 
the super-consciousness and gives us morality that we leave 
to each other," he almost lost the realization of the stubble 
patch that had haunted him, and felt that, brought face 
to face with the crisis which had made itself part of his 
dreams, he was inadequate to the utterance of the words 
which, in a bravery of spirit at variance with his slight frame 
(he was a vegetarian) he had made up his mind to speak. 

He did not speak and she did not answer, but as he went 
away, both felt the exaltation of having passed through a 
transcending soul-experience. > W. J. W. 



A Mother's Milk 
may not fit the requirements of her own offspring. A failing 
milk is usually a poor milk. Borden's Eagle Brand Con- 
densed Milk has been the standard for more than forty years. 
Send 10c. for "Baby's Diary." 71 Hudson St., N. Y. 



One thing that demonstrates the popularity of Mumm's 

Champagne is the fact that 60,000 more cases of it were im- 
ported than of any other kind of wine. The new vintage is 
more delicate in flavor than '93 and similar to '98. 



Many have tried to produce a whiskey as good as Old 

Crow, yellow label, but none have succeeded. It has all the 
good qualities and none of the had ones. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



TIIK very center of ihe city, rnnvontenl U. 
all thr his itOTM ami all plMM of *imi«enient 
European plan. $j » iU» Ami upward*. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Mtulloon Saiiftre Pnrk) 
Fine*. Cdle in tliln oily. 



Milton Roblct. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A High Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 

Mortimer M. Kelly, Manager 




RIGGS HOUSE 

Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 

of the National Capital. First-olasa in all appointments. O. G 
Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

PARAIS0 HOT SPRINGS 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 

F. W. Schroeder, Manager. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B, Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, lor 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention, 

San Prancisco 



BALDWIN ANNEX 

CAFE AND BILLIARD ROOMS 

926-928-930 Market Street and 56 Ellis Street. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Everydelicatesaen 

Domestic and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St., above Kearny 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Mannfacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 
421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389. 

'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



— Da. Shkad y, 274 Lexineton avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento St. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 1, 1902 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

[Main Line, Foot of Market St.] 

lbave] From December 6. 1901 [arrive 

7:00 a Benlcla, Sulsun. Elmlra, and Sacramento 6:55 P 

7:00 a Vacaville, Winters, Rumsey 7:55 p 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Callstoea, Santa Rosa... 6: 5 p 

8:00 a Davis. Woodland, Knlerhts Landlne, Marysvllle, Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 a Atlantlo Express, Oarden and East 8: 5 A 

8:00 A Nlles. Lathrop. StocKton 7:?E p 

8:00 a Nlles, Mendota, Hanford. Vlsalla, Portervllle. 4:55 p 

8:30 a Shasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff, Portland 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle, 

Marysvllle. Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:5 P 

8:30 a Oakdale, Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne 4:5P 

9:00 a Haywards. NlleB, and way Btatlons '11:55 A 

9:00a Vallejo 1: 5 I 

9:00 a Los Angeles Express— Martinez. Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Aneeles 7:55 A 

9:30 A Vallejo. Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ocden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 5:5 P 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers - t :00 p 

3:00 p Benlcla, Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knights Landlne 

Marysvllle, Orovllle 0:55 A 

3:30 p Haywards, Nlles, and way stations 7:55 p 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Callstoea, Santa Rosa 9:55 p 

4:00 p Nlles. Llvermore, Stockton, Lodl 1 : 5 p 

4:30p Haywards. Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore t8:55 a 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare. Baker sfl eld, Saueus lor 

5:00 p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton 0:5 A 

5:00 p Martinez, Antioch, Stockton, Merced, Fresno , :5 p 

6:00 P Haywards, Nlles, and San Jose 7:55 A 

T6:00p Vallejo ' ' 

•:00 p Oriental Mail— Oeden, Denver, Omaha. St. Louts, Ohicaeo... 4:5 P 
7:00 p Oreeon and California Express — Sacramento, Marysvllle. Red- 
dine, Portland. Pueet Sound, and East 8:55 A 

8:05 p a n Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way Btatlons : 5 a 

18:05 p Vallejo 7:55 P 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). (Footof Market St.) 

8:15 A Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 P 

t2:15 p Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos t8:50 a 

09:30 p Hunters' Train — San Jose and way stations., t":20 P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
A.M. 1:00,3:00.5:15. p.m. 

From Oaki.anp — Footof Broadway— 16:00. t8:00, f8:05, 10:00 A, M. 12:00. 
»:00, 4:00 p.m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

6:10 a San Jose and way stations fi:40 A 

7:00 a San Jose and way stations tS:00 P 

/7:00a New Almaden /4;10p 

8:00 a Coast Line Limited — San Jose. Gilroy. Salinas, San Luis 
Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Aneeles and Principal intermedi- 
ate Btations 10:45 P 

9:00 A Ran Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations 4:10 p 

10:30a San Jose and way stations 8:36 A 

li:30 A San Jose and way stations 9:46 a 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara.San 
Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Paciflo 

Grove tl0:45 a 

3:30 P San Jose and way stations . 1:30 p 

t4:l5 P San Jose and principal way stations 5:30 p 

4:50 P Sunset Limited — Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, for Los An- 
eeles, El Paso. New Orleans and New York. Arrives Sun- 
days, Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:15 A 

t5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos, and principal way stations t9:00 a 

6;30 p San Jose and principal way stations f.:30 p 

6:30 p San Jose and way stations 7:30 r 

7:00p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los 

Aneeles, Demine. El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:30 A 

all:45p San Jose and way stations 7:30p 

AforMornine. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted- 

t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baeeaee from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p.m., fo r 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc, No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, February 15. 1902 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 13, 1902 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) , Tuesday, April 8, 1902 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, May 1. 1902 "*? 

Bound Trip oketb at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
Corner First. D. D. STOBBS, General Manager. 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Lessees S. F. and N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibitbon Fkrey — Foot of Market street 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30. 9:00. 11:00 a.m.; 12:35, 3:30. 5:10. 6:30 P.M. Thursdays- 
Extra Trip at 11:30 P.M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:30. 11:00 A.M.; 1:30. 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 P.M. . 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAY8— 6:10. 7:50. 9:20. 11:10 A.M.: 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trlpB at 1 :55 and 6 :35 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.3:40 5:05. 6:25 P.M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave Sai 


Franolsco 

Sundays 
8:00 am 
9:30 ah 
5:00 Pm 


In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 


Arrive tit s t in Francisco 


Week days 
7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petaluma 

Santa Rosa 


Sundays 
10:40 am 
6;05 Pm 
7:35 Pm 


1 Week days 
1 8:40 am 
10:25 AM 

1 i PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 Pm 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsbure. Lytton, 

Geyservllle, Cloverdale 


7;35 Pm 


| 10:25 AM 

1 6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 


8:00 AM 


Honiand. Ukiah 


7135 PM 


: pm 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


8.00 AM 


Guernevllle 


7:35 PM 


1 10:25 AM 


7:30 AM 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 

S:"0 pm 


Sonoma 
Olen Ellen 


9:15 AM 
6:05 pm 


1 8:40 am 

1 ,. PM 


7 :80 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


SebaBtopol 


10140 AM 

7:35 pm 


I 10:25 AM 

1 6:22 PM 




8S "Sierra," for Australia. Thurs, Feb. 6. 10 a. m. 
SS "Alameda." for Honolulu, Sat.. Feb. 15, 2p,m: 
J ine to Coolerardle, Australia, and Capetown. 

Soulh Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS&BROS.CO., 
Aeents. 648 Market Street Freight Office, 327 
Market St.. San Francisco, 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 8teamersieaTeBroad w»ywbarf 

San Franolsco. 



^ 



For Ketchikan. Juneau, TreadwellV, Douglas City, 
Skairway. etc., Alaska, 11 a.m.: Jan. 1. 6. 11, 10. 21, 26. 
31; Feb.5. Change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. r. and Pueet Sound Ports. 11 a. m. Jan. 
1.6. 11, 16, 21; 26, 81; Feb.5. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay). 1:30 p. m. January 2. 
7. 12.17.22.27; Feb. 1. 

For JSaii 1 Metro, stopping only at Santa Barbara. Port 

Los AngeleB and Redondo (Los Angeles). Steamer "Santa Rosa," Sun- 
days, 9 a. u, : Steamer "State of California." Wednesdays; 9 a. m. 

For Los Aneeles, calling at Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos. 
Port Harford (San Luis Obispo) ""Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, 
Hueneme, East San Pedro. San Pedro, and *Newport. I °Bonitaonly.) 

Steamer Bonita. 8 a. m.. Jan. 2, 10, IS, 26; Feb. 3. Steamer Coos Bay. 9 
a. m , Jan, 6, 11, 22, 30; Feb. 7. 

For Mexican Ports. 10 a.m., 7th of eaeh month. 

For further Information obtain folders. 

Rights reserved to chance Bteamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— No, 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.AgtB. 10 Market St.. San FrancfflCd 

Going East, take the 

UNION PACIFIC 



"The OVEKLAND ROUTE." carrying the 
United States OVERLAND MAIL. 

Three through trains EVERY DAY in the Year 



'THE OVERLAND LIMITED" 



NO CHANGE to.... 

DENVER, KANSAS CITT 
OMAHA, CEIICACO 

: Less than 3 days to Chicago, 4 days to New York 

Daily Tourist a ervice. Personally Conducted Tourist Excursions from Sao 
Francisco Wednesdays to Onmha. Si. Paul and Chicago— WITHOUT 
CHANGE. Throutrh to Boston every Friday. 

0. W. HITCHCOCK, Gen. Agt. U. P. R. R„ 

1 Mostgoheby SrftKST. Sin Fa*sci8co. 

Chicago in less than 3 Days 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO AT 10 A. M. 

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buflet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 
R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San PranoiBOO. 




"A Disappearing Type." With S. F. News Letter, February 8, 1902. 



Price p«r Copy, 10 Cant*. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 18P>«. 



Annual Subscription, S4.00. 




(&&lif0xnut%bbtxtiztx* 




Vol. LXIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 8, 1902. 



Number 6. 



The San Francisco Nkwb Lkttkb I* printed and published everv Saturday 
by the proprietor. FREDERICK MAkRIOTT, »}, Kearny St., SanFranclsco 

Entered at Ban Francisco Posted! ce as second-class matter. 

The "(Bee of the 8. F. NEWS LETTER In London ,Eng„ la at SO Cornhlll 
E. r.. London, England, {George Street A Co., Representatives), where 
Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and advertising 

New York Representative — Oscar Ironmonger, 116 Nassau Street, New 

York. 

Boston Representative — W. H. Daggett, 36 Broomfield Street. Boston. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be 
sent to this office not later than 5 p.m. Thursday previous to day of Issue 

Scurvy is another important product of Nome just discov- 
ered. 



There is some talk about a Bill to invite Kruger to visit 
America. Is Bill Bryan the one referred to? 



Of all the crimes that have blackened the record of the 
late outlaw, Ed Biddle, probably the poem, "Just a Little 
Violet," is the worst. 



Prize-fighter Griffo, whose hands became frozen and had 
to be amputated, is still qualified for the prize-ring. His 
tongue was uninjured. 



The old idea that spinsters love cats is dispelled by the 
list of exhibitors at the Pacific Cat Club's pussy show. All 
the cat owners are matrons. 



Historian Graham, in his defense of Schley and his villifi- 
cation of Sampson, has proven that there is one bigger fool 
in the world than Historian Maclay. 



The little handful of police who stood off the big mob that 
wanted to lynch a negro at Chester, Pa„ Sunday, have again 
demonstrated the utter cowardice of mobs. 



If the Philippine rebels have 2,000,000 rifles, as Governor 
Taft tells us, there are still some very eloquent arguments 
on the side of the island insurgents. 



If there is anything that should queer Chinese Exclusion 
it is the fact that Andrew Furuseth, the notorious labor 
leader, has been speaking in its favor. 



There is very little doubt that the young Philadelphia 
woman who shot herself, inhaled gas and swallowed car- 
bolic acid, acted with suicidal intent. 



Lord and Lady Sholto Douglas intend opening a saloon in 
Spokane — doubtless as an antidote to the Earl who led 
tne Salvation Army in the same lively burg. 



A correspondent to a daily contemporary suggests a cot- 
ton-padding chest-covering as a protection against the bul- 
lets of thugs. A pair of fleet legs are better. 



The idea has just occurred to serious thinkers that Mrs. 
White, who resigned the Presidency of the California Club 
because its members voted in favor of the negroes, is 
appropriately named. 



Labor President Gompers is really offended because Min- 
ister Wu referred to him and his ilk as "agitators." Mr. Wiu 
might have called them revolutionists or anarchists with 
more accuracy. This, however, was due probably to the 
distinguished Chinaman's ignorance of English idiom. 



The two members of the Y. M. C. A. who have been rob- 
bing the lockers at that sacred institution, show only too 
plainly that even Christian young men sometimes need the 
money 



Were the tears of the Empress Dowager upon heariug of 
the hardships suffered by the women during the siege of the 
Legation inspired by sympathy or by thoughts of large bills 
for indemnity? 



It is safe to say that at least half of the prisoners now in- 
carcerated in the inadequate and ill-managed Branch County 
Jail belong either in San Quentin, the City and County Hos- 
pital or the wide world. 



If the experience of Mrs. E. V. Darling, who lost T 8,vjd 
worth of diamonds through her befriending an instructor 
in physical training, points any moral, it must be: Don't be- 
friend physical trainers. 



That Judge Harrington of Alturas likes excitement and 
wants another trial on his hands is indicated by his advice 
to the attorneys to leave the court-room and fight it out. 
He would make a better referee than judge. 



Dispatches state that Boxers are plundering the Korean 
frontier, to which the Koreans object. Boxers and their 
pugilistic followers, and admirers are plundering San Fran- 
ciso sports, but the victims seem to rather enjoy it. 



Princess von Anersperg, the daughter of a millionaire 
pickle-maker of New Jersey, has returned to her parents. 
The paternal fortune, it seems, would not forget its origin, 
and insisted upon pickling the noble husband in alcohol. 



Mrs. Caroline Kast and her daughter were not sure 
whether the fungi which they gathered last week at Golden 
Gate Park were mushrooms or toadstools, but they were 
soon afterward able to assure the doctors that they had 
found out. 



And now they've landed "Count" de Lucenay, alias sev- 
eral other titles, in an El Paso jail. So many noblemen are 
being caged in the United States for various crimes that it 
seems only fair to erect a penitentiary especially for the 
aristocracy. 



The proposal to serve wine at the banquet to be tendered 
General MacArthur and General Punston does not meet 
with the approval of the local ladies of the W. C. T. U. 
How pleasant it must be to he great and have your bill of 
fare expurgated by the female fanatics all along the line of 
march ! 



Mr. James Neill, the actor, withdrew from the Elks be- 
cause in Initiation they struck him with a stuffed club. 
Being an actor Mr. Neill ought to have been thankful that 
it wasn't a cabbage. 



A syndicate has founded a summer resort on Long Island 
Sound to rival Newport. If they expect to succeed they will 
have to make a bid for Mr. Harry Lehr or create another 
fool just as great. The News Letter opines that they have 
undertaken the impossible. 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEWS LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 



SOME MORE ARBITRARY METHODS. 

Last week the News Letter gave a detailed account of the 
despotic methods used in deciding the cases of Chinese who 
come here with the intention of making their homes in the 
United States. Investigation reveals the fact that even 
more arbitrary practices are in vogue in regard to Chinese 
in transit through this country to Mexico, Canada and 
other countries. 

The treaty of 1894 between the United States and China 
povides that all Chinese coming to the frontier of this 
country on their way to other countries shall be allowed 
to pass through unless it can be proven that they intend 
to remain in this country. The Treasury Department has 
taken upon itself the power of deciding the intentions of 
U-e Chinese who try to pass through here, and of deporting 
them at will. Congress has not vested the Treasury De- 
partment with any such rights, but it has assumed them, 
and as a consequence the most flagrant abuses now exist 
in the office of the Collector of the Port, and the Immigra- 
tion Bureau in San Francisco. They have absolute control 
over the fate of every Chinaman who comes here. Evidence 
cuts no figure with them. A whim, or a suspicion that the 
Mongolian in question who avers that he is merely passing 
through the country intends to stay here or to return from 
Mexico or Canada is sufficient evidence for these officers. 
Go down to the immigration bureau and you will find hun- 
dreds upon hundreds of records of Chinese who have been 
sent back to their native country without a scintilla of 
evidence by which it could be shown that their intentions 
were fraudulent. 

There are now two cases before the United States Su- 
preme Court that relate to this very matter, and which will 
be made test cases. They were instituted by the transpor- 
tation companies, which are greatly injured by the methods 
now in vogue. The cases are those of Lee Gon Young and 
Fok Young Yo. The former landed here on September 
28, 1901, on his way to Guaymas. The latter came on Sep- 
tember 23, 1901, on his way to Mexico. Both swore that they 
intended to go straight through to their respective desti- 
nations, and there was absolutely no evidence to the con- 
trary. Furthermore, the transportation companies ex- 
pressed their willingness, as they do in all such cases, to 
give ample guarantee that the Chinese would be taken 
through without being allowed to stop en route. In spite 
of all this the representatives here of the Treasury De- 
partment refused to let the Chinese land. Writs of habeas 
corpus were sworn out by the transportation companies' 
attorneys. Young's case was taken before Judge De Haven 
of the United States District Court, and Yo's case before 
Judge Morrow of the United States Circuit Court. Both 
judges declined to act in the matter, and on January 6th 
of this year the cases were taken before the United States 
Supreme Court, where an effort will be made to see whether 
the Treasury officials here are to be allowed to continue 
their despotic practices. 

As a sample of the way the Treasury Department acts 
in the matter: Sixty cases of Chinese who wished to pass 
through the United States and had been refused were taken 
from the books of the Immigration Bureau here. In not one 
of these cases was there a scrap of evidence to show that 
the Chinese should have been deported. The records of 
them were sent to the Treasury Department at Washington 
with a request that they be investigated. They promptly 
came back, and the complainants were referred to the 
San Francisco branch of the Treasury Department, the very 
one against which the complaints had been made. Could 
anything be more ridiculous or more calculated to put San 
Francisco in a bad light? 

Reflect on all this, and see if you can hold to the belief 
that we are civilized. Every day we are violating a provis- 
ion of the treaty of 1894, and violating it in the most flagrant 
manner. Russia does not offer instances of more arbitrary 
or despotic rulings than those continually made here. That 
the citizens of any country should be refused permission 
to pass through our country on the whims of Government 
officials is a shame — and the fact that these officials have no 
more jurisdiction in the matter than any layman makes the 
offense doubly heinous. 



FIGHTING CHINESE EXCLUSION. 
Our local dailies are not giving the news in regard to 
what is going on in other parts of the country in opposition 
to more stringent Chinese exclusion laws. In point of fact, 
they are willfully suppressing it out of fear of their labor 
subscribers. This may be good policy from a breeches 
pocket point of view, but it is not independent or manly jour- 
nalism. Moreover, it is not giving the news that even 
workingmen ought to seek. They are entitled to know, and 
ought to insist upon knowing, the fight that is being made 
by the other side on this question. It has become very clear 
that there is going to be a very sturdy fight against any and 
every kind of Chinese exclusion legislation, and that the 
more stringent measures proposed by our delegation have 
hardly a show for a serious hearing. The " open door" and 
"trade with the Orient" are cries too powerful just now 
for California to overcome, if she wishes to do so, which she 
doesn't. It is one of the anomalies of our attitude that whilst 
we can talk ourselves almost as wild over the advantages 
of an open door into China we can in a moment become al- 
most crazy in the fury of our objections against an open door 
out of China. We cannot much longer have the one without 
the other. The wonderfully able man who now represents 
the Peking Government in Washington is making that fact 
abundantly clear. The treaty we have with China recog- 
nizing our right to exclude her people expires in 1904, and 
Minister Wu makes no secret of the fact that it will not be 
renewed if we proceed on the lines so dear to the hearts 
of our labor unions. The Minister in a quiet way has drawn 
around him a wonderful amount of support. Some of the 
greatest papers in the country, such as the Springfield Re- 
publican, the New York Commercial Advertiser, the New 
York Evening Post, etc., are making a sturdy fight in favor 
of his views, and California is coming in for some pretty hard 
blows, which, however, do not seem to attract the attention 
ot our dailies. Delegations from the great cotton manufac- 
turing industry of the South as well as of New England, are 
crowding Washington to protest against anti-Chinese legis- 
lation, and the same thing is true of delegations of New 
York exporters and importers engaged in the Chinese trade. 
Petitions to the same end are being signed by thousands of 
people all over the country. The Springfield Republican 
says: "The demands of the Pacific Coast are utterly irra- 
tional, and commercially they are of a suicidal nature. They 
should be resisted by the rest of the country, which has an 
interest in this matter which Californians must be taught 
to respect. * • • This is a matter that deeply concerns 
American commerce, to which so much deference is now paid 
throughout the nation, and commerce may be trusted to 
make itself felt where national honor and decency figure 
as unworthy of consideration." The Springfield Republican, 
as everybody knows, is one of the ablest and most fearless 
papers published in the United States, and its influence upon 
Congress is great. It cannot be whistled down the winds, or 
its utterances ignored: except here in California where our 
dailies preserve a discreet silence. The same paper goes on 
to say: "There are other interests than those of a sand-lot 
agitation to be heard this time, and something more than a 
mere sentiment of common decency will be behind the 
Eastern protest." That surely is a daring challenge to our 
local press. Have we a champion ready to take up the 
gauntlet and fight for our fair name and fame? The New 
York Commerical Advertiser quotes a prominent business 
man of Shanghai, who notes the advantage to us that 
must come from having Chinese merchants freely visiting 
the United States as they may desire, and Chinese young 
men as well, bent upon acquiring an American education. 
He says: "These students will in time be the real ruling 
power in China. To-day the example of Japan is being fol- 
lowed, and China is preparing to send her brightest young 
men all over the world to acquire Western ideas, and return 
to the service of the Government. A strong current of 
official and popular favor has recently been developing itself 
towards the United States, and the question now to be wisely 
considered is whether we are to stem this current, and even- 
tually place ourselves in the position of the least favored 
nation, by unwise legislation, which a careful, rational con- 
sideration should prove to be unnecessary, and of no gain 
or protection to any class, trade, people or thing in the 
United States." 



February B, 1902. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A WELL-MANAGED DEPARTMENT. 

A* a husbandman ploughs the soil from which he • 

ip a subsequent crop, so hw the Examiner for some 
weeks past been Industriously engaged In defaming nnd 
abusing the Police Department of this city and It 
agement It goes without saying that the purpose of this 
abuse and defamation Is not the promotion of the public 
welfare. The condition of the police force at this time, 
an.l the manner In which it Is filling its functions. Is not 
of a character which invites attack. We risk no chai 

■isful contradiction when we assert that the police force 
of this city has never been under better discipline, has 
never been more intelligently officered and has never per- 
formed the patrol and detective service expected of it in 
a more satisfactory manner than is the case at the pres- 
ent time. Chief Wittman. who is now at its head, is a man 
who has grown up with the department since, under the re- 
construction act of 1878, it began its evolution out of the 
village constable order of things. He has gradually and by- 
force of capacity, attention to duty and good personal char- 
acter pushed his way upward from the position of a plain 
patrolman to that he now occupies. He is to-day regarded 
as one of the ablest and most alert police officials in the 
United States. 

The basis of the Examiner's hostility to the present man- 
agement of the police force is to be found, according to a 
recent editorial assault, in the alleged facts that the De- 
partment "has always had a policy," that it does not ener- 
getically enforce all the ordinances and penal laws, and that 
individual patrolmen are not allowed to run amuck reck- 
lessly making arrests when and wherever they feel dis- 
posed, without regard to the wishes or instructions of their 
superior officers. To blame the present management of 
the Department because of something that has occurred 
under previous administrations is of course absurd, and this 
is what the charge that the Department has always had a 
policy amounts to. But, leaving that technical phase of the 
question on one side, one cannot resist the temptation to 
ask: what kind of a police administration would it be which 
did not have a plan (or, in other words, a policy), in regard 
to the manner in which its duties should be performed? 
Of course the Department has now, and always has had, 
a policy. And its present policy seems to he an excellent 
one — it consists of preserving public order and suppressing 
crime. As for the statement that all the penal ordinances 
and statutes are not energetically enforced it may be 
pointed out that at least one-third of the penal ordinances 
and statutes of this and all other communities are passed 
with the expectation and understanding that they will be 
laxly enforced. They are passed for the purpose of giving 
the authorities the whip hand, if the vicious elements 
should attempt to run the town, and not for the purpose of 
attempting to establish puritanical conditions. The charge 
that It is the duty of the individual policeman to arrest 
all persons whom he regards as law-breakers, of whom he 
has any personal knowledge is a remarkable one both from 
the standpoint of law and public policy. As a legal proposi- 
tion it is, perhaps, too puerile for serious discussion; but 
as a question of public policy it is susceptible of some illus- 
trations that are worth a passing glance. Suppose, for in- 
stance, that policeman Knight was permitted to arrest the 
Examiner's publisher every time he committed the felony 
(about eignt or ten times a day) of publishing an abortion- 
ist's advertisement? Suppose he was permitted to proceed 
against the paper every time it published a lottery notice or 
list? These are samples of the things that would occur if 
the four or five hundred men composing the Police Depart- 
ment were given roving commissions. But metropolitan 
forces are not operated that way. 



WILL THE BOERS MAKE PEACE? 
Is the much longed-for peace in South Africa within 
sight? It is now authoritatively known that at the urgent 
request of Queen Wilhelmina her foreign minister has 
placed himself in communication with the British authori- 
ties with a view to feeling his way to negotiations for 
peace. But the trouble is that there is nobody in Europe 
on the Boer side to negotiate with. Kruger is no longer a 
factor in South' African affairs. He is mentally and physi- 



cally Incapable of attending to serlotiB business, and DM 
lost control of things. He has fulfilled his mission of 
"staggering tho world." and can no longer be reckoned with. 
The men, and the only men who ran stop the war are the 
■ ommandos in the Held, an.l they are known to he divided 
among themselves as to what Is best to do. The burghers 
who are prisoners of war are sending home remonstrances 
all the time, declaring that it is time to stop fighting; that 
the war is hopeless, and that Its prolongation can only end 
In the death on foreign shores of the men In captivity, most 
of whom will leave families at home totally unprovided for. 
A large number of them have offered to take the oath of alle- 
giance to British sovereignty and go back, as a police force, 
and whip the remaining burghers into submission to law and 
order. The British Government does not accept their ofTer 
but has made known to them that at the termination of the 
war they will all be placed on their farms again and given 
seed and implements and a year's provisions, and that as 
soon as practicable the Transvaal and Orange Free State 
will be erected into a self-governing colony. It is thought 
that the end of the war must soon result from the shear 
exhaustion of the Boers. It is known that Botha Is concen- 
trating the few remaining commandos in the north-east cor- 
ner of Cape Colony, with the obvious intention of there mak- 
ing a final stand. Kitchener has so crowded him that he hail 
nothing else left to do. No opposition is being placed in 
the way of this concentration, because it is the very 
thing the British have always most desired. They couldn't 
bag the Boer because they couldn't catch him. But having 
driven him into a corner he appears to be preparing for 
a stand-up fight. It will be a desperate encounter, with the 
end at no time in doubt. Then will come peace and there- 
after the conqueror will act with such rare liberality as 
to pave the way for the Briton and the Boer living together 
in harmony and in the enjoyment of peace and prosperity. 



EXPECT STIRRING NEWS FROM CHINA. 

The report from Peking that an attempt was recently 
made to assassinate the Empress Dowager is, we believe, 
the prelude to stirring events and probably to a change 
in the ruling dynasty of that country. It is now known 
that the "reformers," or Boxers, as they are otherwise 
known, have not been conquered, or even suppressed, and 
that they are ready at a moment's notice to depose the Em- 
press Dowager and to temporarily exalt the young weak- 
ling who is Emperor in name. Industrious efforts have been 
made in this country and elsewhere to have it appear that 
this would mean reform. It would really mean nothing of 
the kind. On the contrary, it would mean more hatred of 
foreigners than ever. The Boxers are notorious enemies of 
the "white devils," and only await an opportunity to drive 
them into the sea if they can. Despatches from Peking, 
since the return of the court, leave little doubt that the 
young Emperor is totally unfit to take the reins of govern- 
ment. It is well understood that the Ambassadors who were 
inclined to press for the retirement of the Empress Dowager 
are now disposed to recognize her as the only capable ruler 
of China In sight. This means that they have made up 
their minds to make the best of the situation as they find it, 
depending on the closer relations they may establish with 
the court to keep the Empress in a reasonable frame of 
mind. The hope that a better state of affairs can be 
brought about is based entirely on the belief that the les- 
son she has learned from the occupation of Peking by the 
foreign troops will be permanent, and that the safeguards 
provided by the protocol will be effective. It is unfortunate 
that there is no man in China to take the place of Li Hung 
Chang, unscrupulous as he was. He, however, knew the 
foreigners better than any other man of his race, and 
could have kept things going for a time. As it is, we think 
there are ominous changes hanging over China, and that 
any day may bring news of a fresh outbreak that may not 
be as easily disposed of as the last one was. 



It is announced that the Board of Education will appoint 
teachers in "chronological order." Does this mean that the 
ladies will have to open their family Bibles in order to 
vouch that they are old enough to deserve promotion? A 
woman never bought advancement at such a terrible cost. 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEWS LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 



PRINCE HENRY'S VISIT. 

Ostensibly the visit of Prince Henry of Germany to the 
United States is for the insignificant purpose of launching 
the Kaiser's American-built yacht. That is the pretense 
but not the fact. Royal blood does not trust itself on the 
stormy Atlantic in winter to perform a feat so trifling. There 
are greater ends in view, which, happily, nobody on 
this side of the water would move a little finger to frus- 
trate. Ever since the occurrences that took place in Manila 
bay there has been slight doubt as to Germany's feelings 
toward this country. Admiral Dewey then wanted to know 
from Admiral Diedrichs if Germany and the United States 
"were at peace or war." The answer has been long in 
coming, but it is on its way, and is understood to be quite 
satisfactory. Prince Henry brings it, and that is substan- 
tially the purpose of his mission. The Kaiser has simply 
designated the yacht episode as an occasion for making 
known his friendly feelings and good wishes. There is 
further reason why Germany's friendly attitude towards 
this country should remain in no manner of doubt. Pres- 
ently the Reichstag will pass a tariff designed to exclude 
American products. The state of political parties is such 
that it is believed that the measure, for which the Agrarians 
are responsible, cannot be successfully resisted. The Kaiser 
does not want us to feel too badly about it, and is trying 
to put us in a good humor before the shock comes. Whether 
that will prevent us retaliating or not remains to be seen. 
We are rivals of Germany in commercial enterprise; we 
have had frequent occasion to complain of unfriendly dis- 
criminations against our products, and we are none too sure 
of Germany's purposes in South America, but all the more 
is it important that the interests which the two countries 
have in common should not be lost sight of, but that every 
legitimate opportunity should be availed of to strengthen 
kindly relations. Prince Henry is sure of an effusive wel- 
come, partly because we like to have a good time ourselves, 
but more because we shall be delighted to join with our fel- 
low citizens of German birth in doing honor to the Royal 
House of the Fatherland. Although Germany is ruled under 
a system which does not excite an American's admiration, 
it is a familiar fact throughout our various States that no 
European coming to this country takes more kindly to re- 
publican institutions than a German. The large German ele- 
ment in our population is really a safeguard of the repub- 
lic. Internationally considered, it is a valuable asset in that 
it brings the two nations into closer touch and sympathy 
with each other. Just as there are buffer States between 
great empires, so our German people may be depended upon 
to act the part of a buffer between the United States and 
Germany, should any period of irritation between them arise. 
From every standpoint it is well that Prince Henry will 
be given a right royal American welcome. His mission sig- 
nifies peace and friendship between the two nations, and, 
that being so, it becomes at once our pleasure and our 
duty to give it a greeting which for cordiality, may not be 
misinterpreted anywhere. 



THE DEMOCRATS GETTING TOGETHER. 

It becomes every day clearer that the Republican leaders 
are in a quandary over the Philippine question. They can- 
not go ahead because of insurmountable difficulties. They 
cannot at one and the same time close the Philippine door 
and keep that of China open. If they cannot, we shall have 
to go on governing the islands indefinitely for the benefit of 
British and German commerce. They cannot consistently 
exclude the Chinese from this labor market and let them 
into that of the Philippines, yet unless they do, we cannot 
cultivate the islands or make any profitable use of them. 
Governor Taft says the only hope is in the rising genera- 
tion of Filipinos now under American tutelage. That Is to 
say, we are to wait a whole generation before realizing the 
first fruits of our investment. We have already expended 
$300,000,000 on our foolish purchase and the end is not in 
sight. It is now obvious that more men and money will 
be needed for an indefinite period. In this state of affairs 
it is gratifying to notice that at last a strong congressional 
opposition is getting together. The Democratic Senators 
are recovering their grasp, and developing something like 
the true instinct of rolitical leadership. The minority re- 



port of the Philippines committee is a broad, statesmanlike 
document. It is eminently practical, offering an alternative 
policy which could at once be put into execution, and it goes 
to the very heart of existing difficulties. It is "constructive 
legislation" in the best sense of the phrase, and that is 
something for which the Democrats have not been dis- 
tinguished of late. Three years of dogged fighting have 
led only to misery, instability, and, as General Chaffee 
confess, the making of a whole people sullenly and invet- 
erately hostile. To that condition the minority report ad- 
dresses itself, and in a manner so lucid and weighty as to 
merit the widest possible circulation. We reproduce the 
recommendations entire: 

"(1.) That the United States relinquish all claim to sov- 
ereignty over the Philippines, subject to the provisions here- 
inafter set forth. 

"(2.) That from and after the passage of this act the Phil- 
ippine Islands shall be foreign territory, and all goods en- 
tering the United States therefrom shall be subject to the 
same duties, customs, and imposts as are now or may be 
hereafter prescribed by law for goods entered from other 
foreign countries; provided, that during the temporary oc- 
cupation of the islands all trade between them and the 
United States shall be free. 

"(3.) That the United States shall continue to occupy the 
archipelago until the Filipinos have formed for themselves 
a stable government, and until sufficient guarantees have 
been obtained for the performance of our treaty obligations 
with Spain, and for the safety of those inhabitants who have 
adhered to the United States. 

"(4.) That as soon as these results have been accom- 
plished, it is declared to be the purpose of the United States 
to withdraw from the Philippines, and leave the govern- 
ment, control and sovereignty thereof to the inhabitants, re- 
taining only such military, naval, and coaling stations as 
may be designated by the Government of the United States." 



A HUNTING RIFLE FOR ROOSEVELT. 

It has leaked out that the present which Prince Henry 
brings from the Kaiser to President Roosevelt is nothing 
more or less than a hunting rifle, made to order, and of the 
very latest and finest German manufacture. It is in every 
sense a suitable gift. A strenuous weapon to a strenuous 
man, who looks down the mouths of mountain lions, and 
who, for his very life's sake, dare not fail to carry death 
and destruction with his aim, it is an acknowledgment 
from the War Lord of one great nation to the Commander- 
in-Chief of another, that there is a prowess that makes all 
brave men akin. The Kaiser has evidently read of our 
"Teddy," admires his nerve and fearlessness, and takes 
a very obvious way of suggesting that in matters of personal 
strenuousness they are kindred spirits. The making of the 
gm borders upon the romantic, and savors of the days of 
knight errantry, to which only the pen of a Cervantes 
could do justice. Yet the dailies can find nothing higher, 
better or more appropriate to say than that the acceptance 
of such a gift is suggestive of corruption, and that it is 
contrary to an act of Congress, anyhow. Pshaw! Is it not 
humiliating that the President of the United States should 
be prohibited by law from accepting the gift of a hunting 
rifle which comes to him in a cute spirit of humor, and as 
a fit of purely formal courtesy? Is it not also absurd that 
such a restriction should be so much discussed and tele- 
graphed all over the country as a serious item of news, 
and that it should be spoken of and written about with ap- 
probation? The law in question is ridiculous, because in 
the case of an honest President it would be unnecessary, 
while with a dishonest one it would be wholly ineffectual. 
Besides, it implies that the Amer.can people are capable of 
electing a chief magistrate who may be influenced by for- 
eign complacency. All officers of the Government, from 
President downwards, are liable to impeachment or punish- 
ment, for accepting gifts to influence their official action. 
That is enough. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablet*. All drureists refund tlio money If 
It falls to cure. E. W Grove's siirnature Is on each box. Price -■'> oent* 



The name Is a guaranty of Its purity— Jesse Moore Whiskey 

Is always right 



February 8, 1902. 



6AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



MER.E GOSSIP. 



By Betsy Bird. 

Mr». Chauncey Winslow's luncheon last Friday for thirty 
of her friends was one of the most elaborate affairs of the 
season. Mrs. Wlnslow has without exception the most beau- 
tiful dining room in Sau Francisco, the furniture being of 
oid oak. The guests were seated at three tables. One was 
decorated with green leaves, and everything, even the bon- 
bons, matched the decorations. Another table had pink 
roses for ornaments, and the third yellow narcissus. Mrs 
Wlnslow is one of the few ladies in Sau Francisco who can 
give a luncheon for thirty people without sending to a 
caterer for dishes. Some of the plates used cost twenty- 
five dollars each. Mrs. Winslow is wearing a gown this 
season quite bewildering for its beauty. It came from New 
York, and is of white panne velvet trimmed with real lace. 

While we are on the subject of table services, I cannot 
omit to mention that of the late Mrs. Hager. She spent 
many thousands for beautiful china and silver, and some 
of her plates were worth sixty dollars each. The china and 
silver of the Hagers nas never been divided, and is kept at 
the Hager home. When the Hager girls marry, Mrs. Walter 
Deane, Jr., who does not care for the fatigues of keeping 
up so large a house, is going to have a home of her own.' 
Mrs. Walter Dean, Jr., and Mrs. Walter Hobart, are to my 
mind two of the dearest women in San Francisco, for 
they are always ladies and gracious to everyone. Both of 
them have avoided the fashionable habit of slang and it is 
a pleasure to converse wiui them. 

Mrs. Stirling Postley is looking so well in her smart New 
York clothes that she is causing more of a sensation as 
a young matron than she did even as the beautiful Miss 
Cook. She is somewhat rounder than she used to be, and 
this improves her appearance. Mrs. Postley is of a liter- 
ary, serious turn of mind, and has written poetry. She will 
take a house upon her return from Coronado, and will 
entertain a great deal. Each time I see her carrying her 
big white chiffon opera muff I want to grab it and run. 

It is not every debutante who has a scientist for a 
mother. No one would have thought upon seeing Mrs. 
Zenia Nuttall Saturday presenting her daughter to society 
at a tea that she is the author of several books of science 
that make grey-haired men wonder and admire. Mrs. Nut- 
tall has recently brought out a wonderful book to show that 
the world was modeled upon the number seven, and she 
searched the literatures of all the lands to prove it. One 
clever society man said, after reading it: "Well, Mrs. Nut- 
tail's book has this advantage. No one can prove that it is 
not true, because no one knows anything about it." Mrs. 
Nuttall is a protege of Mrs. Hearst, and I believe the latter 
intends her to have a chair at Berkeley. 

There is considerable doubt about whether ex-Mayor Phe- 
lan will be able to sail with the Walter Martins, for he is 
simply overwhelmed with attentions in Washington. The 
McKennas are old friends and move in the very smartest 
set, for the Supreme Court Justices are received by the old 
Washingtonians everywhere. Then Mrs. Colton and Mrs. 
McLean Martin are warm friends. Mrs. Rixey and the 
Cortelyous, and all the Cabinet people, are returning his 
hospitality. Besides, his friend, Mr. Truxton Beale, who 
knows everyone in Washington, is giving him a dinner, and 
Mrs. McLean, Mr. Beale's sister, who has millions to burn, 
is inviting the very nicest people in Washington to meet 
him. In addition, as a multi-millionaire bachelor, and a 
possible United States Senator, he is finamg Washington 
so gay and cordial that he may remain there a few weeks 
longer. 

Miss Jennie Blair entertained Miss Georgia Hopkins, 
her relatives and friends, at dinner Monday night, and af- 
terwards they all went on to the Greenway dance. Mrs. 
Gus Taylor is starting the fashion here of wearing ear- 
rings, and I adore her big white pearl ones. Her cousin, 
Frances Hopkins, wears the same, and soon others will 
be taking them up. It is not necessary to have holes bored 
in the ears, as they ciasp the base of the ear so tightly 
that it is impossible to lose them. 

Upon Miss Blair will fall much of the entertaining of the 
Oelrichs-Vanderbilt party while here. Miss Blair was one. 



<>f Mrs. Oelrichs' olu friends, and Mrs. Oelrlchs has the vir- 
tue of never forgetting her friends. When she first wont 
m York she could not become accustomed to It, and she 
tntorUUneJ principally Cnlifornlans. Later she accepted 
New York society, and she paid less attention to San Fran- 
ciscans. For this she has been blamed, but when one con- 
siders that these same Callfornians never knew how much 
they loved her until she had a certain position In New York 
she is not to be blanx .1. 

Why Mr. and Mrs. Sanger Pullman have taken a house lu 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, is a mystery to me. and yet they 
have done so according to rumor, and are to occupy it this 
spring. 

Every time Mrs. Will Crocker issues invitations for any 
big thing her family shiver. They always say: "Who is go- 
ing to be ill or die?" Mrs. Crocker's invitations have so 
often been recalled by illness or death in her family that 
little Elsie Sperry said, when her uncle died: "I told you 
so." However, as Mr. Sperry was only her great-uncle, 
she went out just the same as usual. 



In Substitute Feeding 
for infants, physicians agree that cow's milk is the basis 
for all beginnings. What is required, then, is the best 
possible milk product. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed 
Milk is ideal, pure, sterile and guarded against contamina- 
tion. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumes 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
esting winter journey across the continent. 




Laurel Hill Cemetery 

"BEAUTIFUL LAUREL MILL" 

Devotes Its entire revenue to the embellishment of Its grounds. Burials 
are continuing aa heretofore- Plots and Graves for Sale, on Lawn Plan or 
otherwise. Perpetual care of same. Within 20 minutes of Kearny Street. 
Many street car lines pass the gate. 

Tel west es. Bush and Central Ave., San Francisco 
GEORGE GOODMAN 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Schilllnger's Patent) In all its branches. Sidewalk 
and garden walk a specialty. 

Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, San Francisco 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 




Pleasure's 
Wand 



Weolvtnowand butTHtabun's. 

— Tom Jfoorm. < ^ 




"The Play's the thing" — so is the name, to a large extent. 
"In the Palace o£ the King" is an unwieldy name, clumsy in 
speech and thought. Suppose "Hamlet" had been called 
"The Downfall of a Wicked King," or "Cyrano de Bergerac" 
had been burdened with such a title as "Wonderful Adven- 
tures of a Man With a Prodigious Proboscis?" For my part, 
I think In the Palace of the King would have been more 
pleasing under the title of "Dolores" — or how would "John 
and Dolores" do? — or, better still, "Johnny and Dolly?" 

Seriously, though, in the case of the production at the 
Columbia the name doesn't cut much figure. The star so 
overshadows everything that people do not ask each other 
if they have seen In the Palace of the King, but if they have 
seen Miss Viola Allen. They who can answer in the affirma- 
tive are fortunate. Miss Allen is a completely satisfying 
actress. 

In the Palace of the King is dramatized from Mr. Marion 
Crawford's novel of that name by Mr. Lorimer Stoddard. He 
has done a pretty good job. There is an exciting plot, and 
to one who has not read the book there are very many sur- 
prises. The story hinges on the love of Don John of Austria, 
half-brother of Philip II, King of Spain, for Dolores, the 
daughter of Captain Mendoza, a soldier in the service of 
the King, who also loves Dolores, but does not care to wed 
her. The story opens at the time of Don John's return to 
the King's castle, a hero, having conquered the Moors. 
Dolores' father, through his intense loyalty to the king, 
opposes the match between Don John and his daughter. 
The plot is too long to tell in detail. Of course it ends in 
the lovers being uniteu, but they go through enough ad- 
ventures in one evening to keep them in fireside talk for 
the rest of their existence. 

Miss Allen as Dolores is graceful and gracious, sweet and 
lovable, charming in the variety of moods she portrays. 
Comedy and tragedy are equally well done by her. u.er 
utter girlishness in the second scene is rather a surprise 
at first — something unexpected and hard to at once become 
reconciled to. Then one falls under the delicious spell of it 
and cares nothing for what may be coming. Her comedy is 
spontaneous, natural, bubbling. In the scene with Don 
John she is the essence of witching grace — capricious, joy- 
ous, volatile. No serious obstacles have yet appeared in the 
path of their love, and she is an irresponsible, merry gin. 
The course of the play transforms her into a woman, and 
the change in her manner is complete. When she faces 
her father and declares herself, one forgets having laughed 
with her. She invests her speech to the soldiers (in the 
fifth scene) with an overpowering force and dignity. 

Miss Allen has not the finish that makes her seem arti- 
ficial, or the polish that obscures her womanhood. Yet there 
is nothing in her acting that suggests a lack of anything 
to make her a pleasing artist. Her work is convincing, 
natural and intelligent. She is a combination of Annie 
Russell and Mrs. Le Moyne, with the former's girlishness 
and the latter's mature poise — hardly their equal in either 
particular, but surpassing both in versatility. 

There is a good company with Miss Allen. Mr. William 
Paseoe is not great as Don John, but he is pleasing, manly 
and away above mediocrity. Mr. W. E. Bonney is excellent 
as the King. He commands attention all through, and in 
the last scene he evokes unstinted admiration. 

Mr. Walter Hitchcock as the Cardinal is very weak. 
Mr. Arthur Hoyt as the King's crippled jester, Adonis, does 
a fine bit of character work. Adelaide Prince plays the 
Princess of Erboli, the lady villain, acceptably. Adelaide 
Warren as Dolores' blind sister, gives a very pleasing ren- 
dition of her part. 

• • • 

Once upon a time, when the world was young, Mr. Joa- 
quin Miller, the poet, wrote a play, "The Danites," which 
is on at the Alcazar this week. To say that Mr. Miller is a 



better poet than playwright is giving too faint praise to his 
verse. 

The play is laid in the days of '49. It opens up with moun- 
tain scenery and miners. A girl, Nancy Williams (Miss 
Convere) and her little brother Georgie, have been taiien 
in out of the wet by the miners. One of them, Sandy McGee 
(Mr. M. L. Alsop), "a rough man without no book larnin'," 
essays to question her. "Listen," she says, "and I will tell 
you the story of my life." It's a blood-curdling story. Her 
family has incurred the enmity of the Danites, a sort of 
Mormon Maffia. There are originally nine in the family, 
but tne Danites pot them one by one, until at last only Nancy 
and Georgie are left. Even as she finishes her story (Geor- 
gie is out behind the scenery picking flowers) there is a 
shot, and in the pandemonium that follows it is announced 
that the Danites have got Georgie. How fleeting is stage 
life: a super fires a blank cartridge and Georgie is dramati- 
cally dead. 

It is two years before the curtain goes up again. When 
it does, the interior of a saloon, full of miners, is revealed. 
They are talking about the death of Georgie and how his 
sister Nancy fell into a torrent from which no one could 
escape alive. Then they begin to talk of Billy Piper, a 
pretty miner who keeps to himself and is poetical. The 
audience begins to suspect — but wait! There's a school- 
teacher coming, just arrived on the coach, and the festive 
miners prepare to scalp him. To their surprise Hulda Brown 
(Miss Wycherly) steps in. She sails right into that group 
of big, rough brutes of men, as chic and chipper as you 
please, and announces that she is the schoolma'am and a 
widow. She is invited to take a drink, but refuses. She is 
gently led away, and Billy Piper appears upon the scene. 
'me tailor has done his work so well that there is no trouble 
in discerning that Nancy has escaped the torrent, and, 
disguised as a miner to escape the terrible Danites, has 
come back to camp. 

Well, there isn't much doing in the next act. The school- 
ma'am, finding there is no schoolhouse or children in camp, 
settles down among the miners anyway, and has all of them 
in love with her. Sandy wins her, much to the discomfiture 
of Billy, who is madly in love with Sandy. The schoolma'am 
has discovered that Billy is a lady, but promises to keep still 
about it. 

This brings about awful complications in the fourth act, 
in which Sandy and the schoolma'am are a staid married 
couple, parents of a bouncing boy. But Billy keeps hanging 
around their cabin. This is innocent enough in reality, but 
not so to the miners, who don't know the secret. They hint 
to Sandy that Billy is in love with his wife. He scorns their 
insinuations, but shortly after finds Billy and his wife with 
their arms around each other, "dearing" to beat the band. 
Red fire and rockets. 

Things come to a climax in the last act, as in all well- 
regulated plays. The miners have found out about Billy 
and Hulda, and determine to drive the former out of camp. 
They are aided and abetted in this by the Danites, who egg 
them on to violence. But just as they are about to close 
in, Sandy (who, though not in the secret, is easy, and be- 
lieves his wife innocent) announces that these two Danites 
murdered Nancy Williams. 1 had almost forgotten about 
the Danites. During all the years that this complication is 
unraveling itself they are hanging around camp, tiptoeing 
before the footlights once in a while like the Burmese em- 
bassy in "Wang," flashing a dark lantern and muttering 
deep remarks to each other. The miners have never liked 
them very well anyway, and when Sandy makes his an- 
nouncement they take them out and hang them in a jiffy. 

Meanwhile, Billy has been getting ready to die, mooning 
around and telling Mr. and Mrs. Sandy where he wants to 
be buried, and asking them to visit his grave. When the 
lynchers come back with the announcement that the Danites 
are dead, Billy, realizing that he will be lonesome without 
them, lies down and dies. Then Mrs. Sandy tells the secret, 
at which all are very much surprised. 

Mr. Alsop does very well as Sandy McGee, considering the 
inanlnity of most of his lines. Miss Convere is forced to 
be namby-pamby, but she manages to do some effective work. 
Miss Wycherly is a charming schoolma'am, and Marie Howe 
and Georgie Woodthorpe take the parts of Captain Tommle 
and Bunker Hill, two women who do the washing for the 






February 8. 1902. 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEW8 LETTER. 



.*. and wind up by marrying two of them. Th.y both 
Blre clever impersonations. Mr. Frank Bacon as the Judge 
has a part that suits his peculiar comedy turn. M 
Howard Scott and Paul Gerson are excellent Danltes. Mr. 
Carlyle Moore as the barkeeper is just about perfect Con- 
sidering the few good points the play possesses and the 
wearisome drag of it, the Alcazar people make B creditable 
showing. 

• • • 

It has been generally Supposed thut everything in the way 
of trained dogs has been worked to death, but that such is 
not the case is demonstrated at the Orpheum this week. 
Mr. Joseph Reichen's trained dogs, two in number, give a 
wonderful example of what may be done by patience and 
Intelligence. They do some wonderful balancing on llieir 
trainer's hands, and keep the audience in a constant stale 
of surprise. Mr. Reichen throws one o£ the animals into 
the air; it turns a complete somersault, and conns down 
with one front paw upon bis hand, where it balances per- 
fectly. The little animal shows wonderful sagacity. 
• * * 

The recital by Mr. Josef Hofmann Friday afternoon of 
last week caused a rather small audience to assemble at 
the Grand Opera House on that day to hear the concert 
under the leadership of Mr. Paul Steindorff. Those who 
went heard one of the best performances of the season. 
Mr. Steindorff still fails to magnetically influence his men 
to the extent necessary for a perfect production — still their 
work is steadily improving. 

The first number on the programme was Dvorak's "New 
World Symphony," which was for the most part beautifully 
rendered. There are some charming passages in it, and 
though it is not so hign-class as most of the music that has 
been given us by Mr. Steindorff it is very pleasing. 

The "Nutcracker Suite," by Tschaikowsky, was a notable 
performance in many respects and full of variety. The 
national dances were done with spirit and dash, although 
the poorest of the lot, the "Danse Chinoise," elicited the 
most applause on account, probably, of its freakiness — 
something which the public cannot get over liking. Lalo's 
"Rhapsodie Espagnol" closed the programme. W. J. W. 



Mary Norman, the elocutionist and monologist, will re-ap- 
pear at the Orpheum this coming week. The Dempsey & 
Mack company will present "A Man of Chance," a one-act 
farce. The three Merrills are comedy cyclists. Wincher- 
mann's trained bears, direct from Russia, via Australia, 
will perform for the first time in America. Rose and 
Jeannette, the dancers, will return for one week, and Ade- 
lina Roattino, the prima donna soprano, will change her 
selections. The Faust comedy trio, Victor Jerome, Lottie 
Fremont and Harry N. Welch will continue "The Haunted 
Mill," and Joseph Reiehens will appear with his hand bal- 
ancing dogs for the last times. The biograph will complete 
tue programme. 

* * * 

Miss Viola Allen, playing "In the Palace of the King," will 
continue at the Columbia next week. Following Miss Allen, 
beginning Monday night, February 17th, " 'Way Down East" 
will be given. Seats on sale next Thursday. 

* * * 

Hofmann, the pianist, returns here for two extra recitals 
to be rendered at Metropolitan Hall. The first is to take 
place next Wednesday night, February 12th. The second 
extra recital is announced for next Saturday afternoon, 
February 15th. The advance sale of seats for the recitals 
at Metropolitan Hall is now progressing at Sherman, Clay 
& Co.'s store. Seats are $2, $1.50, $1 and 50 cents. The 
programmes include selections from Handel, Beethoven, 
Schubert-Tausig, Chopin, Gluck-St. Saens, Liszt, Bach-d'Al- 
bert, Mozart, Rubinstein and Mendelssohn. 

• * * 

"The Ameer" will continue next week at the Tivoli. The 
Tivoli management is preparing to present "The Serenade," 
given here last by the "Bostonians." 

* * • 

The second symphony of the second series under Leader 
Steindorff, will take place at the Grand Opera House next 
Friday afternoon at 3:15 sharp, the usual time. The pro- 
gramme is as follows: 1. Symphony, B minor (unfinished). 



Schubert; 2. Overture, "The Life for the Ciar," Ollnka; 
renade, S. Jadassohn; 4. Phaeton, Symphonic I 
at Saens. The sale of scats will begin at Sherman. 
Ciay & Co.'s next Tuesday morning at nine o'clock, the 
prices ranging from fifty cents to a dollar and a half. The 
final conceit will take place Friday afternoon, ETebruar) 

28th. 

• • • 

"The Rogue's Comedy" will go on at the Alcazar next 
week. It Is by Mr. Henry Arthur Jones, the English play 
wrlght. Mr. M. L. Alsop will have the leading role. Flor- 
ence Roberts, whose season at the Alcazar begins next 
June, is in the city preparatory to touring the coast under 
the management of Belasco & Thall. 



Travelers always go to Zinltand's when they reach 

San Francisco. The fame of this famous caffi has spread all 
over the world. Its food, wines and service are unexcelled, 
and its music is a delight to the patrons. 

O-.L-,, __ San Franolsoo's Greatest Music Hall. 
rPncUm. O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, February 9. 

Mary Norman; Dempsey and Mack Co; Three Marvelous Merrills; 
Wincherraan's Trained Bears; Rose and Jeannette: Adelina Roattino; 
Victor Jerome, Lottie Fremont and Harry N. Welch; The Blograph. 
and last week of 

REIGHEN'S HAND-BALANGING DOGS 

Reserved seats, 25c; Balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats, 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday • 

fl K , _ T L I Belasco A Th all. Managers. . 

rAlcazar I neaxre. phone Main 254 

"Week beginning Feb. 10th. Henry Arthur Jones' brilliant play, 

THE ROGUE'S GOMEDY 

It will be a Stunning Production. Beautifully Gowned Women. 
Elaborate Scenery, The full strength of the SURPASSING ALCAZAR 
STOCK COMPANY. 

Regular Matinees Saturday and Sunday. Prices, 15o, 25c, 35c, 50c 
and 75c. Seats on sale six days in advance. 



UOTTLOB. MAHX A < O 

LesseeB anu Manager*. 



Columbia Theatre 

■-^T Beginning NEXT 1IOSD.IY, 2nd and LAST WEEK, 

VIOLA ALLEN 

and company, presenting the magnificent romance, 

IN THE PALAGE OF THE KING 

Monday, Feb. 17— "Way Down East." 

T ( , I ' r~\ I— I Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

IVOll UDera MOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Evenings at 8 sharp] Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp I 

" Scoring a Tremendous Hit." 

THE AMEER 

Production Unexcelled, Magnificent Cast. 

Next Opera— The Serenade. 

Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



HOFMANN 

THE GREAT PIANIST 

Two Extra Recitals. Night of Wednesday, Feb. 12. Matinee Satur 
day, Feb. 15, at 

METROPOLITAN HALL 

Seats 82 to 50 cents, at Sherman, Clav & Co.'s. 

Grand Opera Mouse. — SPECIAL 

Friday Afternoon, Feb. 14, at 3:15 sharp. 

SECOND SYMPHONY CONCERT (Second Series) 
under the auspices of the SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY SOCIETY 

Paui. Steindorff, Direotor. 
Magnificent Orchestra. Gidlio Minetti. Coneertmeister. 

Reserved Seats— 81.50, 81.00, 75c and 50o. On sale at Sherman. Clay 
& Co.'s Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock. Last concert Friday. Feb. 28 

After the Theatre 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'8 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering place alter the theatre 
Is over 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 




Library&abk 




All Mr. Charles Warren Stoddard's 
In the Footprints writings are replete with an indefin- 
of the Padres. able charm, and no one who has fallen 
under the spell of his "South Sea 
Idyls" will fail to be interested in whatsoever comes from 
his pen. His latest book, "In the Footprints of the Padres," 
will appeal especially to Californians. It consists of some 
seven or eight papers recording his trip around Cape Horn 
at the age of twelve, his youthful experiences in San Fran- 
cisco in the early fifties, followed by short sketches of the 
Mission Dolores, Rincon Hill, South Park, and Happy Valley, 
reminiscences of Vigilance Committee days, and a mass of 
other "memories." "A Bit of Old China" is an exceedingly 
picturesque description of the Mongolian quarter of our 
city as it was two or three decades ago. Nor has it seen 
many changes since then, for as Mr. Stoddard very truly 
says: "China is not more Chinese than this section of 
our Christian city, nor the heart of Tartary less American." 
To give some idea of Mr. Stoddaru's style, which is both 
graceful and graphic, we quote from his Oriental sketch 
the following paragraphs: 

"After supper we leaned from the high balcony, among 
flowers and lanterns, and looked down upon the street be- 
low; it was midnight, yet the pavements were not deserted, 
and there arose to our ears a murmur as of a myriad hum- 
ming bees shut in clustering hives; close about us were 
housed near twenty thousand souls; shops were open; dis- 
cordant orchestras resounded from the theatres; in a dark 
passage we saw the flames blazing upon the thresholds of 
infamy to expel the evil shades. 

"Away off in the bay in the moonlight, glimmered the 
ribbed sail of a fishing junk, and the air was heavy with an 
indefinable odor which to this hour puzzles me; but it must 
be attributed either to sink or sandal-wood, perchance to 
both. 

" 'It is a little bit of old China, this quarter of ours,' said 
the artist, rising to go. And so it is, saving only a notice- 
able lack of dwarfed trees and pale pagodas and sprays of 
willowy bamboo; of clumsy boats adrift on tideless streams; 
of toy-like tea gardens hanging among artificial rocks, and 
of troops of flat-faced, but complaisant people passing gro- 
tesquely in ridiculous perspective." 

Another chapter is uevoted to the mysterious history of 
Mrs. Yelverton, with whom Mr. Stoddard became well ac- 
quainteu in San Francisco. As will be remembered, the story 
of her marriage was utilized by Wilke Collins in his book, 
"Man and Wife." When it was dramatized an enterprising 
theatrical manager hoped by the offer of a goodly sum of 
money to induce Mrs. Yelverton to go upon the stage, and 
enact the role which might have been her twin. "This 
says Mr. Stoddard, "she indignantly refused to do; that 
would have seemed to her an added injury — an effort to 
make a fortune out of her misfortune." The volume is attrac- 
tively bound. A view of the Golden Gate serves as frontis- 
piece, and there are reproductions of some interesting old 
photographs showing Meigg's Wharf, Telegraph Hill, and 
Lone Mountain as they were in the long ago; also, some 
dainty sketches by Peixotto. Most of these papers were 
written years ago, and are now gathered together in book 
form for the first time. To the literature of pioneer days Mr. 
Stoddard's reminiscences are a valuable addition. 
A. M. Robertson, Publisher, San Francisco. Price, $1.50. 

It is inconceivable to readers of de- 
cent literature how certain books ever 
find publishers who will place them 
before the public. The latest book of 
this sort is "The Letters of Mildred's 
It consists of nine letters from a 
woman who should have known better than to write them, to 
a daughter "in the chorus" who should have been ashamed 
to read them. The letters lack humor or merit of any kind, 



The Letters of 

Mildred's Mother 

to Mildred. 

Mother to Mildred.' 



and if the author has attempted to arrive at the pinnacle 
of unveiled vulgarity he has achieved an unqualified success. 
Such books as the above are certainly not for' the young nor 
any decent minded person. One may well ask: "What sort 
of a woman was Mildred's mother?" 

The J. S. Ogilvie Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.00. 
John A. Hassell, M. E., late 

The Boer Concentration Captain of American Scouts in 
Camps of Bermuda. the Boer army, has recently 
issued a little pamphlet, "The 
Boer Concentration Camps of Bermuda," dealing with the 
condition of the Boer prisoners of war transported from 
South Africa to five small islands situated in close prox- 
imity in the Southern part of Great Sound. According to 
the writer the reconcentrado camps of Cuba were not 
more dreadful, nor Torquemada himself more shrewd and 
inventive than our Anglo-Saxon cousins. Let us not for- 
get, he says "that there are thousands of destitute prisoners 
of war almost within hailing distance of our coast who ap- 
peal to us for protection against the vicissitudes of an in- 
clement winter, who without our prompt relief might dupli- 
cate in our neighborhood the terrible death-rate of the 
South African camps. A supply of clothing and digestible 
food is urgently needed." Any profit, derived from the 
sale of the pamphlet, will be delivered to the Boer Relief 
Fund, 136 Liberty street. New York. 

John A. Hassell, M. E., Publisher, New York. Price, 10c. 

Valentine's day will soon be upon us, and 
Valentines. it is noticeable how varied are the cards 
this year, which have been prepared by the 
booksellers to please the eye of man and maid, and to 
delight the hearts of a lover and his lass. Messrs. Elder 
& Shepard have a series of original valentines which are 
quite a departure from the old lace paper affair, combining, 
as they do, humor with art interest. Their most ambitious 
valentine is "The Fool's Confession." 

"The fool could learn but letters two 
And these, my dear, were I and U." 

The whole is a humorous play upon words and letters, all 
inverse. It comes tied with red ribbon, and rolled in a cylin- 
der, and is something most unique in the line of valentines. 

Elder & Shepard, 238 Post street. 

Edward Everett Hale's well-known story, 

En Son Nom. "In His Name," has been admirably and 
faithfully translated into French by Mme. 
Mary Prince Sauveur, with the authorization of its author. 
"En Son Nom" is a book so simple, so pure and so elevating 
that none better can be placed in the hands of pupils or 
the general reader, who is familiar with elementary French. 
An apt quotation from La Bruyere heads the preface, one 
that it would be well to bear in mind whenever we open a 
new book or recommend it to the reading public. It says: 
"Quand une lecture vous Sieve l'esprit, et qu'elle vous in- 
spire des sentiments nobles et courageux, ne cherchez pas 
une autre regie pour juger de l'ouvrage; il est bon et fait 
de main d'ouvrier." 

William R. Jenkins, Publisher, New York, Price, $1.00. 

Books Received.— Funk & Wagnalls Co.: "The Color of 
His Soul," by Zoe Anderson Norris, price, $1.00. 

Hinds & Noble — "How to Attract and Hold an Audience," 
by J. Berg Esenwein, price, $1.00. 

J. F. Taylor & Co.: "Lachmi Bai: The Jeanne d'Arc of 
India," by Michael White, price, $1.50. 

American Writers' Trust: "Inauguration of President 
Watterson, and Other Nonsense," price, 25 cents. 

William R. Jenkins :"En Son Nom" (in French), by Ed- 
ward Everett Hale, price, $1.00. 

John A. Hassell: "The Boer Concentration Camps of Ber- 
muda," by John A. Hassell, M. E., price 10 cents. 

MARY E. BUCKNALL. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 

Robertson's i26 ^tstr«t 



rebruary 8, 1902. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEW* LETTER. 



11 



@own C) 



own \~ner 

'Xetr tht Cr.cr! '.tfhtt Vie dent art 'Aeu ' 
'Oct thit wit piijt tht dtvtl , jtr. wftflyou ' 




Oh, twiddle a twaddle of Paul Harvey Ford 

Of Dimmers the limit, of flnmmcrs the lord, 

Who came to the West on a satellite plan 

With one Dr. Beeman, a chewing-gum man. 

Full lightly he spake of New York and the Hub. 

Of supper and ball room, of sea side and club. 

And he gave all the chappies an elegant con 

Till he walked with the Smart Set and swam with the Tou. 

But I'm sorry to say 

That there came a dark day 

When someone requested Paul Harvey to pay, 

And a shower of bad bills-heads made matters the worse, 

For that careless young man had forgotten his purse. 

Then there came a detective as heartless as Nero, 
Who showed some Rogues' Gallery prints of our hero, 
Desired in the East for some ninety-nine games 
He'd played under ninety-nine different names. 
And the name of Paul Harvey was suddenly missed 
From the Four Hundred Ones on the Visiting List. 
Now the clubs and hotels his initials emboss 
O'er the dolorous column of Profit and Loss. 

Moral. 

When the Farmer comes not in the Bunco Man's way 
He turns his attention to Mightier Prey. 

School Director and Musical Director ROnconvieri is going 
to investigate! . Sacr-r-amento ! Little Johnnie Raggio was 
not granted the heaven-born privilege of running the Han- 
cock school, and the Principal was so blind as to ignore the 
eminent fitness of the lad to run the school with the co- 
operation of the North Beach hoodlums. In fact, the prin- 
cipal was so old-fashioned in his methods as to lay the boy 
over a chair and paddle him with a triple rattan. The neKt 
morning Superintendent Blanchard was met by the refined 
contingent from North Beach and greeted with salvos of 
rotten eggs, which proves conclusively, according to the 
theory of Musical Director Ronconveiri that Mr. Blanchard 
is unfit to teach school. I am glad that Johnnie Raggio was 
beaten; not, of course, because I think that a vicious little 
North Beach brat ever deserves a thrashing, but because I 
am immensely relieved to think that the strenuous musician, 
Ronconvieri, has at last a chance to try his newly-pledged au- 
thority. 

"Where, O where, has Octavius gone?" Octavius was the 
News Letter's office cat — a beautiful animal, happy in his 
home as he could be. And he has disappeared. The office 
boy tells me that he saw a female with a face that betokened 
disappointed hopes and misplaced zeal hovering around the 
stairs, purring and clucking. I think she was a Felinethrop- 
ist, and that she swiped Octavius. I'll bet that right now 
Octavius is out in the Cattery, compelled to associate with 
the riff-raff cats of the street, brought in there for proper 
food and exercise. And I'll bet Octavius doesn't like it a 
b.,,. Octavius is a blue-blooded cat, particular about his 
associates. His aristocratic tendencies made exercise dis- 
tasteful to him, but what little he needed was cheerfully 
furnished him. We all miss him. Felinethropists of the 
Cattery, bring back our Octavius! 

Aleck Truman is a special policeman with exaggerated 
ideas of the privileges that attach to his exalted office. 
Truman went into the country and shot some ducks. Then, 
despite the fact that this is the closed season, he tried to 
sell them. He was promptly arrested, at which he grew 
extremely indignant, haughtily informing his captor that 
he was a policeman himself. He acknowledged a good 
deal of surprise when the real policeman — as I said, Tru- 
man is only a special — failed to go on his knees and apolo- 
gize. Special Policeman Truman, your thinker has a kink 
in it. 



When I began to read a telegram from Stockton In Which 
detailed the WOee of Dr. 0. W. Evans, pastor of the 
Central M. E. Church In that city, I began to feel sorry for 
him — and It's seldom I sympathize with a preacher. The 
ml gentleman Bet forth in a speech that he still had 
$190 due him on last year's salary, that only one hundred 
and forty-four out of four hundred and seventy-six members 
oi the Church had contributed toward his stipend, and that 
many a day he had walked the streets of Stockton, fighting 
mosquitoes, malaria and hunger, without a nickel in his 
pockets. But a further reading of the dispatch reveals the 
fact that Dr. Evans receives $175 per month, which is $2,100 
per year, and that even with the shortage mentioned he 
drew down $1,910 last year; also, that the three hundred 
and thirty-two delinquent members don't produce because 
they don't like Rev. Evans. (What should it matter to him, 
anyway, how many contribute toward his salary?) Now it 
strikes me that a preacher in Stockton ought to drag along 
pretty well on nearly $2,000 per year. Of course, it's differ- 
ent in San Francisco, where there are so many temptations 
to squander money — but there should be no trouble in Stock- 
ton. 

"All that is necessary to be a successful medium Is to 
know how to catch suckers," is the cheerful assurance which 
Medium Charles B. Brockway handed out to his pupil, ±ienry 
Emery, after the latter had spent several weeks in trying 
to learn the spook business. Now, I admire a candor like 
that. It seems a pity that they should have arrested him 
for admitting that he is doing what every medium, fortune- 
teller and astrologer in the city is doing both wholesale and 
retail. "That's wan way o' gettin' the money," said Mr. 
JJooley of Christian Science; and the same can be most 
truthfully said of spiritualism as a trade. Only a week ago 
the Crier saw a "Catalogue of Spiritual Goods" issued by a 
tiitsburg firm offering a lengthy list of sleight-of-hand de- 
vices at commercial rates. Thank you, Mr. Brockway, for 
giving us your professional assurance that spiritualism con- 
sists in knowing how to catch suckers. 

I hear that "Sir" Henry Pritchard is very angry about 
the blistering exposfe to which he was subjected in last 
week's News Letter. Well, I wouldn't be a bit surprised. To 
have the public find out that one is a swindler, debauchee 
and seducer generally hurts one's business. The facts 
about "Sir" Henry's palmistry parlors are becoming known, 
and decent women who know his reputation Keep away from 
there. Letters to the Chief of Police from fathers and 
husbands reveal plenty of instances of his lecherous methods. 
"Sir" Henry still advertises in the dailies, but I notice that 
he doesn't say anything about having read President Roose- 
velt's hand. The letter from the President that the News 
Letter published last week rather queered tnat pretty little 
story. By the way, what examples as moral censors are the 
dailies that are publishing "Sir" Henry's advertisements af- 
ter hearing the truth about him. 

N-e-x-t! The cops are after you. The raid started Sunday 
on people who insist upon spitting on the sidewalks. Several 
wagon-loads of them were taken to the Bastile, and it cost 
most of them five dollars apiece to get out. I am rather 
inclined to think that the orders to arrest in the future 
every man who spits upon the sidewalk is somewhat of a 
bluff. Such ordinances cannot be made wholly prohibitory, 
but by making a raid once in a while its efficacy is greatly 
strengthened. I have seen even policemen spitting on the 
pavements, and many worthy citizens commit the misde- 
meanor absentmindedly. But an occasional wholesale ar- 
resting orgie such as the police indulged in Sunday goes a 
long way toward abating the nuisance. You don't know 
when the spasm may come, and you don't know but you will 
be next. 

And now the witnesses for Mrs. Reeves-AtkinBon declare 
that there were no strange noises at all heard during the 
day or night at the Sutter street sanitarium. This is the 
strangest case I ever saw. First it was the wail of the 
dying. Then it was Mrs. Guggenheim's noisy parrot. Then 
it was the cat. And now that the witnesses have gone 
through the whole menagerie they declare that there were 
no noises at all. In my humble estimation it is time for the 
witnesses to think again. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 




Before Mr. Truxton Beale, ex-Minister to Persia and 
Greece, went East, he was presented with a handsome dia- 
mond horse-shoe scarfpin by Mr. Tom Williams, the horse- 
owner. The reason for the present is a good story. One 
night Mr. Beale received while at dinner in the Pacific- 
Union club a beautiful flashing diamond pin. It came in 
a box from Shreve's, and Mr. Beale was charmed. Mr. Wil- 
liams' card accompanied the gift. He immediately rushed 
out and purchased something handsome for the horseman. 
Then he met Mr. Williams and thanked him for his gener- 
osity. Mr. Williams explained that he always felt like 
giving diamond horse-shoes to his friends, but on this occa- 
sion had not done so. Then Mr. Beale was embarrassed. 
He recalled that his dinner companions had smiled as he 
opened the box, and he realized that he had been the victim 
of a practical joke. The following day he received ano^er 
box from Shreve's with a diamond horse-shoe pin within. 
This bore Mr. Williams' card, and Mr. Beale was indignant. 
One joke was bearable, but two were impossible. He threw 
the pin on the floor, and then told the jokers what he thought 
of them. They denied the charge, and Mr. Williams hear- 
ing of the matter, went to Mr. Beale and told him he really 
had sent him the pin. Then there was a dinner for the 
jokers and Mr. Williams. 

• • • 

San Diego Elks are greatly excited over an incident of a 
session held by the lodge there a few days ago. The San 
Diego police have taken a hand, and are trying to bring the 
matter into the police courts. The hall of the San Diego 
lodge was crowded a few nights ago, when a shooting affray 
between members A. F. Cornell and Patterson Sprigg oc- 
curred. 

Sprigg and Cornell are prominent in San Diego, and have 
always been intimates. During the early part of the even- 
ing there were rumors of a falling-out between them. 
Finally, Exalted Ruler Hornbeek called on Cornell to speak 
for the "good of the order." Cornell arose and said that he 
would not be able to respond, as he was in no mood for 
talking. Urged by the ruler to unburden his mind, Cornell 
began an arraignment of an unnamed brother. He termed 
him a coward and a blackguard, and said that if the scoun- 
drel's resignation was not offered he would leave the lodge. 
Cornell grew so furious that he had to be held down in his 
seat. 

During the confusion Sprigg arose and said he was the 
man referred to by Cornell. He demanded an investigation. 
Some San Francisco visitors said that they would depart 
and leave the lodge to settle the matter. Suddenly both 
Cornell and Sprigg drew revolvers and fired point blank at 
each other. The lights went out, and twelve shots rang out 
in the darkness. The entire herd fell over itself in the 
gloom. Those who could find their way ran into the street, 
and many rushed to their homes. Others returned with 
blanched faces, trembling at the expected .sight of dead men, 
and at thought of the imminent scandal. Suddenly the hall 
was flooded with light, music was heard, and Cornell and 
Sprigg were seen doing a Cakewalk down the center of the 
hall, roaring with laughter. They were jubilant over the sell 
they had perpetrated on their fellows. The fellows were 
puzzled whether to accept the joke or not. The police who 
heard the shooting were worked up considerably and have 
demanded that Cornell and Sprigg be arrested for disturb- 
ing the peace. However, it is likely that the matter will 
be let drop. 

San Francisco Elks are on the look-out for Cornell and 
Sprigg, and when they visit the lodge here they may ex- 
pect as great a surprise as they gave the San Francisco 
visitors. 

• • * 

Mr. Horace Egbert's reputation as an authority on matters 
pertaining to horse racing is firmly fixed, but the Examiner 



employees will never put faith in his judgment again 
Whereby hangs a melancholy tale. 

Last week, Mr. Egbert's horse, Snowberry, was entered 
to win. He was so absolutely certain of this that he backed 
the animal with a thousand dollars, and began to make 
plans of a tour of the world, as Snowberry was a 15 to 1 shot. 
With his customary generosity he gave the tip to his 
brethren on the Examiner. The brethren decided to take 
advantage of it — so did the sistern down to the telephone 
girl and the office boy, who was delegated to take the coin 
to the track. "Jake" Dressier bet a hundred, and the others 
bet what they could raise. All the money in the Examiner's 
safe went to Emeryville. 

The evening before the race the whole staff rang the 
praises of Mr. Egbert; now all are poor, but none do him 
reverence. The name of Snowberry is frequently and 
potently anathamatized in the local room. 

Immediately after the race, this telegram came to the 
anxious plungers: 

"Unfortunates, the Examiner Staff — Snowberry too ripe. 
She rotted at the half. Betting commissioner Healy leaves 
track on stretcher. EGBERT." 

You may be able to guess what the men said and whai 
the telephone girl would have liked to say. A sulphurous 
smell still lingers around the office, and the looks that the 
racing expert receives from the telephone girl are eloquent. 
She lost a dollar. 

• • • 

The "Undertaker's Horse," so sweetly sung in Kipling's 
numbers, has got the Looker On into trouble, as is set forth 
in the following letter from a San Diego embalmer: 

San Diego, Cal., Feb. 1, 1902. 
San Francisco News Letter, San Francisco, Cal. 

Gentlemen: In your issue of January 11, 1902, you have 
an article purporting to emanate from a San Diego corre- 
spondent, who recently, he says, "told a thing or two about 
Madam Tingley," that is so absolutely without truth that 
its falsity is fascinating. I was the owner of the white 
horses referred to in that article during all of their lives 
spent in this vicinity, and am not, and never have been a 
convert to Theosophy, and did not present this team or 
any other to Mrs. Tingley, nor anybody else. Neither is it 
true that Mrs. Tingley is now driven behind this "dashing 
white team." unastrally or otherwise, for both the horses 
referred to have been dead for more than a year and a half, 
and were both owned by me continuously up to the time of 
their death, and were never used by Mrs. Tingley. Further, 
I have been a constant resident of this city for years, and 
have frequently seen Mrs. Tingly being driven about the 
city, but never in anything that I took to be other than a 
livery carriage, and if she has ever here used a fine "brou- 
gham" or any other private carriage, I have never seen nor 
heard of it. 

I do not know what course Mrs. Tingley will take to cor- 
rect the viciousness of such a false publication, but as to 
myself, I hope you will, out of a sense of fairness and 
common honesty, retract the mis-statements as publicly 
as you have permitted them to become circulated. 

Very truly yours, W. W. WHITSON. 

> • • 

The Examiner has been abusing local society and clubs 
for receiving Mr. Paul Harvey Ford, who seems to have 
gone rather a crooked path on his way to California. 
The facts in connection with Mr. Ford are these, as told 
by a man who knew him in Cornell. He comes from a very 
excellent family in Ithaca, New York, where he was promi- 
nent socially. He was in Cornell for several years, and one 
of the best-known athletes of that university. As a fratern- 
i./ man and athlete he was extremely well known. Young 
Prescott Scott was in Cornell about the same time as Mr. 
Ford, and all the Cornell men here knew him. Consequently 
he was welcomed on the Olympic eleven by Captain Cadwal- 
lader and all of the university athletes, for he has been a 
football coach. Mr. Ford was brought up with the foolish 
idea that he should not work, and he Is reaping the conse- 
quences. It is known that his aunt sent him a check for five 
hundred dollars within a month, and he lost it all at the races 



February 8. 1902. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



ist for three humlrcil more, anil it did 
All Cornell men here know that Knr.l la 

ttemaa by Mrtii mid education, but ha baa a queer ill 
him. 

• • • 

The dallies announce with much eclat trial Mrs. "Jack" 
Gardner. "Boston's society queen," will entertain I 
Henry when lie comes to Boston, and that he will be enter- 
tained at her new Italian villa for an hour. That he will be 
entertained may he taken even more literally than the 
dallies set forth, according to a Boston BOclet; man with 
whom I was talking yesterday. 

According to my informant. Mrs. Gardner occupies rather 
a unique position in Bostou society. She is a confirmed 
lion chaser, and her many doings are regarded good-natur- 
edly by the real society people of the Hub — who, by the 
way, do not seek to have their names paraded before the 
world. They look upon her as good entertainment in a vaude- 
villlan way, and I have no doubt that the German Consul at 
Boston (Herr Reinecke, I believe) had that fact in mind 
when he arranged for Prince Henry's visit to her home. 

• m • 

I just heard a good story on the late Chief of Police Sulli- 
van which illustrates the kind-heartedness of the man who 
was killed by political spite-work. It was after the inter- 
collegiate football game two years ago — the year when 
the roof of the Glass Works tumbled in with its load of 
spectators. At the time of the accident the police deserted 
the football grounds and the place would have been entirely 
without constabulary had not a student official hunted up 
Chief Sullivan, who ordered out an extra force to police 
the grounds. After the game there was the usual gathering 
of light-headed youths at Zinkand's, and among the boys 
was the student official, bubbling over with beery enthu- 
siasm. During the evening, who should enter but Chief 
Sullivan, who was signalled out by the tipsy collegian. 

"G' evenin', Chief," said the boy, bracing himself on his 
pins, and grasping the Chief warmly by the hand. "Chief, 
I want t' thank — you — pershonally — fer — favor — extended — 
thish — aft'noon." 

"All right," said the Chief. "Come to my office to-morrow 
and you can thank me there." 

"No," persisted the youth, with drunken stubbornness. 
"Wansh t' thank you pershonally." 

By this time a crowd had congregated, among these sev- 
eral young fellows considerably the worse for wear. The 
student body official was still thanking the Chief "pershon- 
ally," when the Chief gave an order to a subordinate and 
the polite collegian and three of his company were gently 
persuaded out of the place. A carriage was called, and the 
sleeping quartette was driven quietly down Market street 
to the Palace Hotel, where they were very much surprised 
to find themselves on the following morning. 

Chief Sullivan footed the livery bill. 

• * * 

Mrs. Lovell White, to whom so much credit is due for the 
success of the convention of women's clubs now being held 
in San Francisco, had rather an amusing experience Tues- 
day. 

During the day a twenty-dollar piece was found on the 
floor of the convention hall, and was given to Mrs. White 
in order that she might try to return it to the loser. It 
was wrapped in a scrap of paper, and Mrs. White examined 
the letter carefuay to see if there was anything on it that 
might identify the loser. To her surprise she found that it 
was covered with writing which referred to her, some of the 
comments being complimentary, some decidedly otherwise. 
She announced the finding of the coin, and soon afterward 
a lady came forward and claimed it. 

Mrs. White asked her name, which the lady gave, with the 
further information that she was reporting the convention 
for a Los Angeles paper. 

"Well, I am glad to know who takes such an interest in 
me," said Mrs. White, as she handed her the coin and the 
scrap of paper. The lady reporter glanced at her tell-tale 
notes, turned several colors and incontinently fled. 




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BORDEAUX. 



Fine Clarets 
and Sauternes 



In Cases, Quarts, and Pints 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Sole Aeente. 
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other the 

STUDEBAKER 
vehicle that he 
drives. 

iStudebaKel*, MARKET and TENTH STS. 




Gray Bros. 



Hay ward Bldpr., California and Montgomery 

streets. San Francisco, 

205 New Hi eh Street, Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificial 
stone work. 



R.\lil\V3crt [Brut] 

CHAMPAGNE 

Established in J729 
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HILBERT BROS., 21321s market street 

AGENTS PACIFIC COAST. 
V. W. GASKELL, Special Aeent. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper ft Co., 746 Market street, Ssn Francisco. 

Ambkoian Dispensary. 514 Pine street, above Kearney. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

, (Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 



Phelan Bldg. Tel- Main S387 



San Francisco, Gal. 



14 



8AN FRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



February 8, 1902. 




Four dances were given during tne week. Monday night 
came Mr. Greenway's cotillion, and on Friday evening was 
u*e last meeting of La Jeunesse, at which the patronesses 
received. Wednesday evening Miss Elizabeth Huntington 
gave a dance party in honor of Miss Louise Redington and 
Miss Hazel Noonan of Los Angeles. Thursday evening Mr. 
and .irs. Winthrop Elwyn Lester gave their annual dance, 
with Miss Georgiana Jones, Mr. Lester's cousin, as guest 
of honor. 

The only engagement of importance that was announced 
during the week was that of Miss Marian Eels, daughter of 
Mr. Charles P. Eels, the attorney, and Lieutenant Conrad 
Babcock, son of Mr. and Mrs. general Babcock. Miss Eels 
belongs to the exclusive Ross Valley set. Her brother is 
engaged to marry Miss Coffin, the niece of Mrs. Kittle. 

The marriage of Miss Maud Mullins and Dr. John Rodgers 
Clark took place at Grace Church Wednesday evening at 
eight-thirty. A reception was held later at the residence of 
tne bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Frederick Mullins, 
on Gough street. The bride's maid-of-honor was Miss Leon- 
tine Blakeman, and the bridesmaids were: Miss Ethel Hager, 
Miss Mary Polhemus, Miss Alida Ghirardelli, Miss Grace 
Spreckels, Miss Gertrude Van Wyck, and Miss Charlotte 
Eninwood. Dr. Clark's best man was Dr. C. C. Collins, 
U. S. A., and the ushers were Dr. McBean, U. S. A., Mr. 
Frank Owen, Mr. Knox Maddox, Mr. Ralph Hart, and Mr. 
B. C. Carroll. 

Mrs. Wallace Dean gave a card party at the Palace yester- 
day afternoon. Mrs. Carolan invited a number of the older 
married people to play cards Wednesday evening last. air. 
and Mrs. George Boardman have issued invitations for a 
card party Monday evening next. 

Mrs. John Simpson is giving a tea this (Saturday) after- 
noon at her home on Vallejo street, to introduce her daugh- 
ter, Miss Margaret, the younger sister of Mrs. Bishop Par- 
tridge. The hostess is assisted in receiving by the Misses 
Jennie and Emma McMillan, Miss Gertrude Palmer, Miss 
Conly, Miss Susie Conly, Miss Helen Gibbs, Miss Anita Ber- 
theau, and Miss Jeannette Deal. 

Mrs. Samuel Knight and Miss Olive Holbrook' also are 
giving a tea this afternoon from 5 to 7. They were assisted 
in receiving by Miss Margaret Salisbury, Sophia Pierce and 
Leontine Blakeman. 

Owing to the death of Mr. Frederick Griffith, the Misses 
Allen did not receive Wednesday afternoon. Mrs. John 
Parrott was called south during tne week by the dying condi- 
tion of her daughter, Madam de Guigne. The de Guigne 
girls are debutantes, but they have given up society this 
winter because of their mother's ill-health. 

Monday afternoon Mrs. Jessie Bowie-Dietrich entertained 
twelve friends at luncheon. On the evening of the same day 
Miss Olive Holbrook had a number of friends at dinner. 
Among them were: Miss Lucy King, Miss Sophia Pierce, 
Miss Margaret Salisbury, Miss Leontine Blakeman, Miss 
Bernie Drown, Miss Ethel Cooper, Messrs. Brockway Met- 
calf, Percy King, George Whipple, Mee, Burbank Somers, 
Howard Meeder, and Dennis Searles. 

Mrs. A N. Towne and Mrs. Clinton Worden have departed 
for Santa Barbara. Tuesday they held their only at home. 
Muey were assisted in receiving by Mrs. Florence Pope 
Frank, Mrs. J. A. Frazier, Mrs. H. E. Huntington, Mrs. A. 
S. Tubbs, Mrs. Fletcher Ryer, Mrs. Longstreet, Mrs. Frank 
Johnson, Mrs. Chauncey Winslow, Mrs. Charles J. Bailey, 
and Mrs. Arthur A. Smith. 

Mrs. Henry Oscar Beatty was at home Friday, and will 
receive her friends on the two following Fridays. 

Last Saturday evening Miss Gladys Merrill gave a dinner 
party at her home on Washington street. Afterwards the 
guests attended the chrysanthemum dance. Little Miss 
Bourn, who is not yet out, also gave a small dinner, and 



among her guests were Miss Elsie Sperry, Miss Landers, 
and Miss Helen Dean. 

There were two luncheons Thursday. Mrs. Eugene Lent 
entertained some friends at her home, and Mrs. Rosenstock 
gave a large affair at the Palace. Mrs. Lucie May Hayes of 
Oakland gave a large tea on the same day in honor of Miss 
Elsie Sperry. 

Mrs. Martin returns to town next week, and will give 
several large affairs upon her arrival. Mrs. Oelrichs will 
be the motif. The officers are to give one of their pleasant 
hops at the Presidio Monday evening next from 8.30 until 
11.30. 

Wednesday, Mrs. Harry Nathaniel Gray had a large 
luncheon in the Red Room of the Bohemian Club. Friday 
afternoon Mrs. Alexander Wilson had a euchre party. 

Mrs. Lester Herrick gave a delightful card party Tuesday 
afternoon at 1001 Pine street, in honor of Mrs. Weir, who 
was Miss Whittier. Among those present were: Mrs. Jen- 
kins, Mrs. Ellicott, Mrs. Keeler, Mrs. Chester H. Smith, 
Mrs. J. E. Bermingham, Mrs. L. H. Bryan, Mrs. Elmer 
Stone, Mrs. George Carr, Mrs. J. L. Deahl, Mrs. Llewelling, 
Miss Mary Polhemus, Miss Marion Harrison, Miss Elsa Cook, 
Miss Ives, Miss Dibble, Miss Frances Thompson, Miss Grace 
Thompson and Miss Voorhies. Mrs. A. S. Tubbs gave a 
large luncheon Tuesday. On the same day Mrs. Wor- 
thington Ames gave a tea which was in honor of her sister. 
Miss Edith Preston. Mrs. Ames was assisted in re- 
ceiving by the Misses Spreckels, Mrs. Preston, Mrs. L. 
D. Owens, Miss Tiny Cadwallader, Mrs. McNutt, Miss Ames 
and Mrs. Ben Lathrop. 

The Misses Spreckels will give a large dinner Monday 
next. Mrs. Henriette Zeile gave one of a series of dinners 
last evening, preceding La Jeunesse. 

Mr. Clarence Follis is home from Coronado Beach; Mrs. 
Horace Pillsbury is back in town. Mr. and Mrs. J. Sloatt 
Fasset and children of Elmira, New York, are at the Palace. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Reilly are at the Palace. 

Mrs. McKittrick is in town, but will go to Bakersfield for 
a few weeks, and then return for a long stay. Miss Ethel 
Cooper has come back from Stockton. Miss Gertrude Eels 
will be home from Europe within a few weeks. She will 
come out next year. Miss Nannie Van Wyck is leaving for 
tne East within a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Athearn Folger will give a smart cotillion 
in the parlors of the Palace Monday evening next. On the 
same day Mrs. John W. Phillips will give a large lunch 
party. 

Mrs. Phoebe Hearst gave a reception Thursday afternoon 
at her rooms in the Hearst building. Her niece, Miss Ap- 
person, assisted her in receiving. 

The Alden Club will give a reception from two until six 
on the afternoon of St. Valentine's Day, at 1622 Clay street. 
There will be several instrumental and vocal numbers and 
recitations, and three palmists will be in attendance. Ad- 
mission will be 26 cents. 

Mr. Ira Joseph is out of town on a two weeks' vacation. 

Mr. W. W. Von Tillow was host at a delightfully informal 
dinner served at the Poodle Dog, December 29th, as a fare- 
well bachelor feast. Covers were laid for twenty-one gen- 
tlemen. Pink carnations were the leading note in the 
floral decorations. Those present were: Messrs. W. W. Von 
Tillow, W. J. Von Tillow, L. Hart, W. G. Harder, W. Kuhl, 
J. Dencker, H. Bruenn, M. Kuhl, George Humphry, I. Hum- 
phry, S. E. Selling, J. Selling, P. Parker, B. Kaufner, M. 
M. Cohn, P. Hagan, O. Rosenstein, W. Blank, C. N. Splero, 
M. F. Sullivan and B. Douglas. 

Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 

LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

633 MARKET STREET. 



February 8, 1902. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWt LETTER. 



Thing* arc shaping ItramaelVM Into form for 
<ira» ball on the owning of rVlirunry 1 1th. I 

lenasao » ill be I 
Carnival and Mrs. Cadenasao «iii be Queen oi the Uardl 
Gras. Mr. Alfred J. M< Kinnon, who was Court Ji si 

will fill lbs sumo role this yenr. The Bohemian Club 
voonllats who will sing are as follows: Messrs. Uurhnnk (i. 
Somcrs. Elmer B. Blmmona, Clarence T. Wendell, H. P. Cart 
ton. William P. Nielsen, Charles J. Dlekman, C. 11. Lamber- 
ton and Horace P. Veeder. The fact that gentlemen are not 
allowed to wear masks or costumes puts a good deal of a 
damper on the affair; still society is looking forward to an 
enjoyable time. 

The touch of spring is in the air at Del Monte. The winter 
weather there is always good, but is better than usual this 
season. 

Among the guests at the Occidental Hotel this week are 
Mrs. GooJall, wife of Captain Goodall. Angel Island, Com- 
mander Adams of the Alert, and Mr. and Mrs. William Far- 
rell, Vancouver. 

Travel to San Rafael is constantly increasing, as will be 
seen by the following list of arrivals during the past week at 
Hotel Rafael: Mr. and Mrs. Otto Schoning, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. Huffield, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Marshall, Mr. F. G. Water- 
house, Mrs. E. Card, Mrs. Herbert Law, Mrs. Charles H. 
Wilson, Mrs. A. E. Blake, Mrs. William Plunkett, Mr. Emyln 
Lewys, Miss Mary Carrington, Mr. W,511iam Curby, Mr. Wil- 
liam Kelly, Mr. E. M. ..nson, Mr. Morton L. Cook, and 
son, Mr. Reuben C. Haas, Mr. F. C. Stamford, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. R. Stanford, Mr. M. C. Osborn, Miss Lida O'Brien, Mr. L. 
Fuch, Mr. Wilfried Suaife, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Flint, Mr. 
and Mrs. B. D. Boswell, Mr. and Mrs. W. Woodbury. 

It is a matter of surprise that Madame Nordica was ill 
enough that her managers cancelled her engagement here. 
A singer must be very ill indeed when they will go to such 
lengths. The News Letter announced last week that she was 
a very sick woman, but her managers insisted up to the »ast 
moment that she would appear. But her illness took such a 
serious turn that they saw it was absolutely impossible for 
her to fulfill her contract. 

Madame Nordica is a singer worth hearing, but she is a 
victim to the greed of her managers. She gave concerts 
in the South when hardly able to stand, and they were her 
undoing. The managers overstepped themselves. Had they 
cancelled the less profitable Southern engagements, Nordica 
would have been able to attempt to sing here, where there 
is more money in it. But in trying to grab everything in 
sight they broke her down, and so lost a profitable San 
Francisco season. 

This (Saturday) evening the "Juvenile Fairyland Carni- 
val," a novel entertainment and fair, opens at the Mechanics' 
Pavilion. This will be one of the most unique affairs 
ever held in San Francisco. There will be booths, exhibits, 
juvenile side-shows, band concerts, drills, fancy dances, 
specialties, cake walks, etc. There will be a great allegori- 
cal ballet, "Sunshine Among the Flowers," and the new il- 
lustrated dramatic song, "He Was a Native Son." In addi- 
tion, the Pacific Cat Club's annual cat show will be held 
during the carnival, which continues one week. Bennett's 
Military Band will be in attendance. 

Handel's "Messiah" will be produced on February 13th 
by the Berkeley Oratorio Society of sixty voices at Shat- 
tuck Hall in Berkeley. The Berkeley Orchestral Society ■ 
will furnish the orchestral accompaniment. The soloists 
will be Miss Grace I. Davis, soprano; Mrs. Lena Carroll- 
Nicholson, contralto; Mr. Roy Max Smith, tenor; Mr. S. 
Homer Henley, basso; Miss Maud Hellendorff, pianist, and 
Mr. Clinton R. Morse, conductor. During the past year the 
society has produced "Creation" once and "Elijah" twice. 



The freshest fruits and vegetables may always be 

found at Omey & Goetting's, stalls 33-34-45-46 California 
Market. Everything high-class. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

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I Original I 
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Laden with Sentiment, 
Or Gay with Frivolity. 

No Lace Paper. 
Various Prices Irom SO 
cents to 

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238 POST STBEET. 



(Juvenile Fairyland Garnival 



A MOST NOVEL ENTERTAIN- 
MENT AND FAIR 

opens this Saturday Nlerht at 



MECHANICS' PAVILION 

Continues for one Week (Sunday Excepted.) Doors open 1 to 11 
p- m. BoothB, Exhibits, Juvenile Side Shows, Band Concerts, Drills, 
Fancy Dances, Specialties, Cake Walks, etc. All for young and old. 

The Great Allegorical Ballet Production: "Sunshine Among the 
Flowers." First production of the musical dramatic song-, with illus- 
trations, " He Was a Native Son." 

Bennett's Military Band. Pacific Cat Club's Annual Cat Show. Don't 
miss it. Admission, 25c; children, 10c. 




RAGING! 

EVERY WEEK DAY, RAIN OR SHINE 



NEW CALIFORNIA JOCKEY CLUB. 



OAKLAND RACE TRACK. 

Races start at 2:15 p. m. sharp. 

Ferryboats leave San Francisco at 12 m. and 12:30, 1. 1:30. 2:30 and 3 p. m„ 
connecting with trains stopping at the entrance to the track. Buy your 
ferry, tickets to Shell Mound. Last two oars on train reserved for ladles 
and their escortB, No smoklne. All trains via Oakland Mole connect with 
San Pablo-avenue electric cars at Seventh and Broadway, Oakland. Also 
all trains via Alameda Mole connect with San Pablo-avenue eleotrio cars at 
Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. These electric cars co direct to the 
track